Everton Independent Research Data

 

TOM JONES TO PLAY ON SATURDAY
April 1, 1941. The Evening Express
By Pilot.
Tommy Jones, Everton’s Welsh international centre-half has been selected to play for the Blues against Southport at Haig-Avenue on Saturday in the Liverpool Senior Cup. Jones was injured in the match against Manchester City ten days ago, and it was feared he had fractured an ankle. During the week-end, however, he was examined by a specialists, who diagnosed a severe strain. Tommy say he is ready to play on Saturday. He was to have reported for R.A.F training today, but his calling-up has been postponed for a fortnight in action some more before he finally goes into the Service. Everton will be without Billy Cook and Joe Mercer, who will be playing in the international game at Blackpool, and Ted Sagar has left the district. So two of Everton’s youngsters come into the side. Lovett, the Shrewsbury boy, will be in goal –he has done well on his first team appearances this season –and the local lad, Finnis, will be at right half. It will be the second first team appearance of Finnis. He played at Bury at left half. He is a stalwart of the “A” team. Jack Jones will be at right back, and George Jackson continues at centre-forward. Everton; Lovett; Jones (Jack), Greenhalgh; Finnis, Jones (Tom), Watson; Bentham, Catterick, Jackson, Stevenson, Lyon.
Everton “A” team will entertain Burscough Vics in a George Mahon Cupt0e at Goodison Park, and preserve with Cheers at centre-half. This lad did well when returning to the team recently. Everton “A”; Johnson; Ireland, Dugdale; Sharrett, Cheers, Atkins; Williams, Lindeman, Powell, Owen, Bailey.
• Mercer younger brother enters the soccer arena and his career will be watched with interest, he is a left half-back, had spells with Grange United, is now with Port Sunlight Olympic, a Belington League club.

EVERTON AND LANCS CUP-TIE.
April 4, 1941, The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log
Everton without a match on Saturday April 12, are hoping to arrange with Burnley to play their Lancashire Senior Cup tie at Goodison Park on that day. This will be the second “leg” of the tie for the right of entry into the semi-final in which the winners oppose Blackpool. Everton gained a lead of 3-2 at Turf Moor. Burnley are already contacted to oppose Bolton Wanderers in a North Regional game at Turf Moor on April 12 but Secretary Mr. Theo Kelly of Everton has been in touch with Mr. Fred Hargreaves, secretary of Lancashire County F.A. to see if the county authorities can arrange for the Burnley-Bolton game to be deferred.
Finnis Gets His Chance.
Finnis, the young local boy and stalwart of Everton’s “A” team, gets his chance as Centre-half in the senior side tomorrow, when Everton go to Southport in the Liverpool County Senior Cup. Tommy Jones, the Welsh international having sent word that he is not fit. Bentham goes to right half, allowing Bo Bell to be at inside-right for his first game this season, Jack Jones will be at right back, and Lovett in goal. Hodgkiss, a Southport pre-war regular, hopes to make his season’s debut at left back and W. Dobson, the local amateur will be in goal. Southport (from):- W. Dobson; Little, Lowe, Hodgkiss; Bradford, Harrison, Newcomb; Grainger (D), Johnson, Curran, Finch, Harker, Howard. Everton:- Lovett; Jones (jack), Greenhalgh; Bentham, Finnis, Watson; Catterick, Bell, Jackson, Stevenson, Lyon.
Everton “A” play Burscough Vics tomorrow, at Goodison Park

EVERTON VISIT SOUTHPORT
April 4, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
Ranger’s Notes
Everton, a much depleted, Everton, visit Southport in the Liverpool Senior Cup tournament and although the Seasiders will put up a determined struggle Everton should win through. The last time they met Everton sauntered to a convincing victory, but since then have not won a match. On the other hand, Southport showed improved from when beating Bolton Wanderers last week. In recent weeks Everton have been guilty of missing simple chances. This fault was responsible for their k.o in the League Cup. Tommy Jones is still unable to play so Finnis goes to centre half, Bentham right half, Bunny Bell outside right. Southport (from):- W. Dobson; Little, Lowe, Hodgkiss; Bradford, Harrison, Newcomb; Grainger (D), Johnson, Curran, Finch, Harker, Howard. Everton:- Lovett; Jones (jack), Greenhalgh; Bentham, Finnis, Watson; Catterick, Bell, Jackson, Stevenson, Lyon.

HEADED IN A CORNER KICK
April 5, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
Catterick’s Goal for Everton.
At Southport
By Stork.
Everton:- Lovett, goal; Jackson and Greenhalgh (captain), backs; Jones (JE), Finnis, and Watson, half-backs; Bentham, Catterick, Bell, Stevenson, and Lyon, forwards. Southport:- Dobson, goal; Little and Lowe, backs; Bradford, Harrison and Newcombe, half-backs; Owen, Kitchen, Curran, Finch, and Howard, forwards. Referee Mr. A.V. Smith, of Liverpool. Everton are trying to arrange a fixture against Manchester United at Goodison on Saturday next. There was only a small attendance at the semi-final tie of the Liverpool Senior Cup, at Haig Avenue, today. Both sides were below strength. In fact it was not until almost the last minute that Southport know the composition of their side. Everton had a goal lead in three minutes, a corner being the starting point of Cattrick’s goal. When Bentham dropped his flag kick into the goalmouth. Southport’s young amateur goalkeeper was all at sea as to how to deal with Catterick’s header. He made a frantic effort to make contact, but was yards out of judgement. Catterick was almost through again in the next minute, but was unable to get a full-blooded drive at the ball. Southport replied with some good passing movements, but so far they had failed to call upon Goalkeeper Lovett. It was plain to be seen that Everton were the superior side and Dobson made a fumbling sort of save and then showed that he knew something about goalkeeping when he cut out a Bentham shot. He repeated this a few minutes later when the outside right was clean through to what appeared to be a certain goal. I think there was a streak of luck about this save. Curran was brought down just outside the penalty area, and taking the kick himself slashed the ball over the bar. At the seventeenth minute Everton went further ahead. Stevenson after three shots at goal, the first two of which were cannoned out, finally landed the ball in the net, followed by a strong protest from the Southport side that Stevenson was offside. A linesman was in favour, but the referee though otherwise. The Southport forwards, while showing skill in their manipulation of the ball, rarely called upon Lovett, who, however, had to make a hasty punch away from Curran. Young Lyon should have made the score 3-0 but hooked his shot, the ball passing wide. Lovett, in pulling a ball down from under the crossbar, lost possession, but before Kitchen could take the opportunity Lovett had the ball pushed from off his toe. Little fisted the ball out of the Southport net from the penalty, Lyon scored.

EVERTON IN LOCAL FINAL
April 7, 1941. The Liverpool Daily Post
Southport 3, Everton 5
Southport Lose at Home.
By Stork.
Everton won their way to the final of the Liverpool Senior Cup when they defeated Southport 5-2 in the penultimate stage at Haig Avenue. The result also counts in the League table. Catterick scored for Everton in three and Stevenson at seventeen minutes. Southport struggled on until Little fisted the ball out of the net and gave away a penalty. J. Lyon netted. Bell headed a neat goal from Lyon’s centre. Southport made a rally and scored two goals in two minutes. Curran’s opening goal was a result of a flick and Finch picked up a clearance by Lovett and cracked the ball to the back of the net. Within a minute a round of passing by Bell, Bentham and Catterick ended with the latter nodding what looked a simple goal, whereas it was a spectacular point.
Frayed Tempers.
Some feeling crept into the game, and there were several displays of fisticuffs, players of both sides being guilty and being spoke to by the referee. Curran was brought down in the penalty area, but Lovett made a brilliant save. Close to the end Finch centred, Lovett tried to sweep the ball over the bar, but instead of it –rising high –it dropped back towards the net. Lovett dashed back and tried to punch it clear without success. So the game ended on a thrilling note. Southport had put up a fighting finish, but in the main Everton were much the better side, and had not Southport young goalkeeper, Dobson made some fine saves Everton’s victory would have been larger? Finnis, in place of Tom Jones, performed in a manner which suggest better things to come. There was more life about Everton’s attack than a week ago, Catterick being more like, and Bentham and Stevenson were more like themselves than in recent games. Bell, who made the first appearance for Everton this season, kept the line moving smoothly. Of the Southport side I liked none better than the veteran Newcomb. Curran is a prodigious worker and Owen middle the ball enticingly, but there was no great finish to the line. Attendance 1,000 Receipts £48. Everton:- Lovett, goal; Jackson and Greenhalgh (captain), backs; Jones (JE), Finnis, and Watson, half-backs; Bentham, Catterick, Bell, Stevenson, and Lyon, forwards. Southport:- Dobson, goal; Little and Lowe, backs; Bradford, Harrison and Newcombe, half-backs; Owen, Kitchen, Curran, Finch, and Howard, forwards. Referee Mr. A.V. Smith, of Liverpool.
• Mercer and Cook played for The British Army against the R.A.F at Blackpool and gained a 3-1 victory.

EVERTON IN FINAL.
April 7, 1941. The Evening Express.
By Watcher.
Everton are in the final of the Liverpool Senior cup. They completed a “nap hand” of victories over Southport this season by a 5-3 win at Haig-avenue. But with a little more forcefulness in attack the seasiders might not have lost. Down 4-0 at the interval they fought back splendidly against a shaky defence. Lovett the Everton goalkeeper, brilliantly saved behind a penalty in the closing stages. Everton’s more direct methods in attack were the deciding factor, and the 18-year-old Dobson in the home goal repeatedly made brilliant full length saves, especially in the first half. Catterick was the danger man and headed two lovely goals. Bell, who kept the line going well, also netted with a smart header. Stevenson and Lyon (penalty) –a grand middle winger –got the other goals. Watson was the big man in defence with Finnis shaping creditally at centre-half. In goal Lovett did well. For Southport, Curran and Finch (2) netted. The amateurs, Owens and Howard were the best forwards, with Little and Bradford stars in defence.

SOUTHPORT’S EFFORT
April 7, 1941. The Liverpool Echo.
By Stork.
Everton did not help their goal average in any great extent by the Liverpool Senior Cup-tie victory over Southport even through they had the satisfaction of winning their way to the final. Don’t forget they held a four goal lead at the interval and seemed well set for a big victory. But Southport in three short minutes ripped down this big lead by two goals and made the game look more remarkable from this point of view. They were back in the game with a possible chance but a fifth goal in another minute left them lagging again. They will fought on and gained a penalty kick, which Lovett saved brilliantly and then near the end obtained a third goal, so that Everton’s promised big win did not materialism. It was an interesting match, with Southport making it doubly so by their determined effort towards the close.

INTERNATIONALS BACK
April 8, 1941. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log
Three of Everton’s internationals –Billy Cook, Joe Mercer, and Tommy Jones –return to the team to oppose Manchester United in the North Regional match at Goodison Park on Saturday. Cook and Mercer –return from the victorious British Army team to replace Jackson and Bentham at right back, and right-half respectively, and Jones, who has now recovered from the ankle injury-received at Maine-road, comes back for Finnis. Bentham reverts to outside right, and Bob Bell will make his first appearance at Goodison Park this season. He leads the attack. Everton; Lovett; Cook, Greenhalgh; Mercer, Jones (Tom), Watson; Bentham, Catterick, Bell, Stevenson, Lyon.
• Lawton will played for The Football league against All-British X1 at Anfield on April 19, Cook, T.G. Jones and Stevenson will play for the British X1.

UNBEATEN RECORD.
April 10, 1941. The Evening Express.
Pilot Log
Everton have a record to preserve against Manchester United on Saturday. It will be the fifth time they have not this season and so far the United have not beaten the Blues. The Blues will have Tommy Jones, Joe Mercer, and Willie Cook back on duty. Everton’s best attendance this season was for the Manchester City cup-tie, but that might be beaten on Monday when Blackpool make their first visit to the ground this season, Blackpool, at Anfield recently, demonstrated that they are one of the finest combinations in the game at the moment. Blackpool have been sweeping all before them, and recently recorded “double” over Liverpool and Manchester United, but if Everton again have to help of their internationals I think the Champions will win. Everton (v. Manchester United, 3.p.m); Lovett; Cook, Greenhalgh; Mercer, Jones (Tom), Watson; Bentham, Catterick, Bell, Stevenson, Lyon.

EVERTON’S STAR ATTRACTIONS
April 10, 1941. The Liverpool Echo.
Ranger’s Notes.
Everton followers have two grand games for their entertainment this week-end. Manchester United being at Goodison on Saturday and Blackpool on Monday. For Saturday’s game Everton are back to practically championship strength in defence, while the need for improvement in attack has led to the introduction of “Bunny” Bell at centre forward. Last time United were at Goodison in the League Cup, it took the home side all their time to get on top by the odd goal, even with Lawton in the front line. The Mancunians are a well-balanced side with a swift-moving and effective attack, and all the prospects point to another grand exhibition. Everton; Lovett; Cook, Greenhalgh; Mercer, Jones (TG), Watson; Bentham, Catterick, Stevenson, Lyon. United will be minus Rowley, and so far haven’t been able to fill his place. Probable team:- Breedon; Roughton; Warner; Porter, Whalley, Bryant, Smith, A.N. Other, Carey, Mitton, Aston.

EARLY GOAL AT GOODISON
April 12, 1941. The Evening Express.
United Start The Scoring
By Pilot.
Manchester Utd, had to borrow Wyles, the Everton player, to fill the outside right position against Everton at Goodison Park today. Tommy Lawton, the Blues’ international centre forward, will play against Blackpool at Goodison Park on Monday. He is home to leave. Everton:- Lovett, goal; Cook (captain) and Greenhalgh, backs; Mercer, Jones (Tom), and Watson, half-backs; Bentham, Catterick, Bell, Lyon, and Jackson, forwards. Manchester United:- Carey (J), goal; Carey (T), and Roughton, backs; Warner, Porter, and Whalley, half-backs; Wyles (Everton), Smith, Rowley, Aston and Mitten, forwards. Referee; Mr. W.H. Evans (Liverpool). Wyles quickly forced a corner for the United and he placed this fast and low. Lovett dived across and fisted the ball away, but was injured when he fell. He was able to resume. Smith had a good chance of giving United the lead, but he banged the ball high and wide. Porter shone with some good defensive work for the United, breaking up all Everton’s attempts at close combination work. The United took the lead in eight minutes through Rowley. Aston and Smith got Wyles away, and Wyles passed into the in-running Rowley. Lovett came out to intercept, but Rowley got there first and just managed to push the ball into the net. Everton almost equalised in the next minute when Jackson cut inwards just inside the Penalty area, and let go a right foot shot which passed inches wide of the far post. The Everton forwards showed little promise of breaking down the United’s well-ranged defence until Mercer and Billy Cook started to throw their weight into attack. This had the effect of stirring the Blues to action –and Bell contributed an excellent run which brought a corner. From this Carey saved from Lyon.
Narrow Escape.
Rowley should have made it two when he slipped around Jones, but Lovett went full length to save. The United’s forwards were more direct in their work, but after Carey (J) had pushed away am awkward centre from Jackson. Mitten cut in and placed low across the Everton goal, but there was no one up to accept the chance. Mercer strove valiantly to get his forwards away in rhythmic manner, but the United defenders and Rowton in particular, were exceptionally quick with their intervention. Bell allowed the ball to run past him to Catterick, who, however, could not get in his shot. The United were making quicker and better use of the ball than the Blues, who were inclined to hold it too close. The United continued the more effective combination and their defence was exceptionally good. Lyon took over after diligent work by Mercer, but failed to hit the ball truly and it passed outside. Everton at last began to exert pressure, but the United defence stood firm and by accurate covering kept shooting chances down to a minimum. Mercer began an excellent movement, in which he got a quick return pass from Lyon, but Carey (J.) had come out, and he just managed to flick the ball away as it was passing over his shoulder.

UNITED TAKE EARLY GOAL.
April 12, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
Fast Forwards at Goodison
Lawton’s ‘Date’
By Stork.
Everton:- Lovett, goal; Cook (captain) and Greenhalgh, backs; Mercer, Jones (Tom), and Watson, half-backs; Bentham, Catterick, Bell, Lyon, and Jackson, forwards. Manchester United:- Carey (J), goal; Carey (T), and Roughton, backs; Warner, Porter, and Whalley, half-backs; Wyles (Everton), Smith, Rowley, Aston and Mitten, forwards. Referee; Mr. W.H. Evans (Liverpool). Tom Lawton will be home on leave over the week-end, and will play for Everton against Blackpool at Goodison Park on Monday. Early in Everton’s game with Manchester United at Goodison Park today, Lovett was injured, and had to receive attention. In a smart piece of defensive work, T. Carey risked dribbling in front of his own goal, but was so confident in himself that he got away with it. Smith was given a grand chance to draw first blood, but was well off the mark with his shot. Manchester, playing fast progressive football, took a goal within eight minutes through Rowley, the Everton defences getting somewhat tied up in endeavouring to check the United forwards. Everton almost equalised when Jackson shot only inches outside the upright. Bell tried to rush his way through and found the United defence a stiff proposition. Everton forwards thus far had been well taken care of by the Manchester rearguard, but there were opportunities for the taking. United, still sticking to their wide-open game, severely tested the Everton defence without however, giving Lovett any great worries. The football was interesting if only because of the way it fluctured.

A LAST MINUTE GOAL
April 14, 1941. The Liverpool Daily Post
Everton 1, Manchester United 2
Everton Lose to Manchester
By Stork.
Manchester United had some compensation for their cup defeat by Everton when at Goodison Park on Saturday, they defeated Everton 2-1, the last goal coming in the final minute just as a drawn game seemed certain. The United were the much more progressive side; faster to the ball and into the tackle and employing a more open game, which got then to grips with the Everton defence in the shortest possible time. Everton seemed slow in comparison and made work for themselves instead of “making the ball do the work.” The Everton forward line is suffering from the want of a marksman. Had there been one of any real account they must have won, for there were innumerable opportunities for goal scoring but no one forward shone in the matter of shooting. The United started their goal scoring after eight-minutes, and by a strange turn of fortune it was an Everton player who made the goal possible. Wyles loaned to the United, providing the centre which made T.G. Jones falter and let in Rowley, who squeezed the ball past Lovett. Lovett was perhaps suffering from an injury sustained in the first minute for he was late going down to the ball. At this point of the game the United were playing the better football. They flung the ball from wing to wing at a fast pace, and often had the Everton defence running around in circles. Nevertheless Everton prevented any further score until the fleeting minutes of the game when Jones again erred. He ran forward to head away a harmless looking long ball down the middle. He did not make true contact, the ball slithering off his head behind him to Rowley, who rounded Lovett, and shot into the empty net. But Everton had reduced the United’s lead prior to this through Catterick just before the interval. Everton kept the United on the defensive and W. Carey the United goalkeeper, had a little luck in getting in the way of drives by Mercer and Bell. But don’t let us forget the mighty saves of Lovett from point-blank range shots by Wyles, Smith, and Rowley. Everton:- Lovett, goal; Cook (captain) and Greenhalgh, backs; Mercer, Jones (Tom), and Watson, half-backs; Bentham, Catterick, Bell, Lyon, and Jackson, forwards. Manchester United:- Carey (J), goal; Carey (T), and Roughton, backs; Warner, Porter, and Whalley, half-backs; Wyles (Everton), Smith, Rowley, Aston and Mitten, forwards. Referee; Mr. W.H. Evans (Liverpool).

PERFECT UNDERSTANDING.
April 14, 1941. Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log
The feature of Everton’s game with Manchester United, which brought the United their first win in five attempts this season against the Blues was the perfect understanding existing between Joe Mercer and Billy Cook. It was the acme of perfection. With the Everton attacking firing on only one cylinder, as it were. Mercer throw everything he had –and that was plenty –into attack. He went far afield in that effort to get the attack working smoothly and effectively and did it with complete confidence because of the perfect understanding he had with Cook behind him. It was a lesson in position tactics. Whenever Mercer moved up Cook quietly stepped in to close the gap and hold the United left wing in a tight grip. Nothing in this exciting game compared with this “close harmony” work of the two internationals. Everton had chances enough to win, but they missed Lawton and Stevenson. George Jackson, at outside-left this time –his seventh position of the season –was as effective as any forward. The United were always quicker to possession and in development, despite last minute team shuffles. Cecil Wyles served them well –too well from Everton’s standpoint –at outside right, and young Aston the former “Mujac” took the eye. Rowley whom the United have converted into a centre-forward with marked success, took both goals, and Catterick scored Everton’s point. A word of praise or young Lovett the Blues goalkeeper. His fielding of the ball was excellent, Watson and Greenhalgh were consistently good, and apart from a couple of mistakes Jones dominated the centre of the field. The 4,234 spectators, who paid £210 must have been well satisfied with the game, which improved with time.
• Ted Sagar, Everton’s goalkeeper, springs into the news. He plays for the Irish League against the League of Ireland today, yet another honour to add to his long list. He takes the place of Breen of Manchester United.

EVERTON TAKE EARLY LEAD.
April 14, 1941. The Evening Express
Lawton’s Goal Against Blackpool
By Pilot.
Tommy Jones, Everton’s Welsh international centre half, was not fit enough to play against Blackpool at Goodison Park today, and it is highly improbable that he will turn out in the international match at Anfield on Saturday. Mercer took over the centre-half position in an Everton team and Jackson was brought in at left half. Bentham at right half, Watson at inside left, and Bell at outside right. Everton:- Lovett, goal; Cook (captain) and Greenhalgh, backs; Bentham, Mercer and Jackson, half-back; Bell, Catterick, Lawton, and Lyon, forward. Blackpool:- Strong, goal; Pope, and Hughes, backs; Russell, Whittaker, and Johnston, half-backs; Johnston, Buchan, Twigg, Jones, and Burbanks, forwards. Referee; Mr. H, Hartles, (Runcorn). About 7,000 spectators saw Lawton celebrate his return to the Blues with a sinuous run before being crowded out while he afterwards side-headed the ball when facing a dual challenge and Catterick was able to go on and place across the face of the goal. Jackson shot yards wide before Burbanks surprised Cook and retrieving a ball which looked like running dead. The ball was swing right to Johnson, whose his centre was curling into the net when Lovatt managed to push it away with one hand. Everton quickly retaliated and Catterick just failed to reach Lawton’s headed pass. Jackson stole the limelight with some timely interventions being Lyon forced a corner on the left and from this Bell had an obstructed for another corner.
Strong Fists Away.
Strong fisted away from the head of Lawton and Lovett shone when he came out to make a perfect catch off Johnson’s centre. This was good interesting football, with the Blackpool forward play often a source of sheer delight. Trig got the ball into the net, but seconds after the whistle had sounded for offside. Lawton surprised the opposition by moving across field and then letting go a right foot shot which passed by the upright. Everton took the lead at 20 minutes through Lawton, and it was the first real scoring chance the day. Lawton made no mistake receiving a quick through pass from Catterick, who had made ground repaidly, Lawton went on to place into the far corner of the net with the left foot. Lovett failed to clear a good centre by Burbanks and Tragg headed in. The ball was passing into the net when Greenhalgh headed away. Johnson made a quick return, and as Jones went down to head through Mercer was through with the winning clearance. Catterick fouled as he was going through on his own, but Lawton’s penalty line free kick crashed against a barrier of players. The Everton defence received innumerable calls but responding brilliantly, the strength of the tackling being a feature, Lawton leadership too was a source of delight. Cook went well afield to open up the way for Catterick and from his centre Strong just managed to push aside Lawton’s header. Bell placed over the top and it was really a good game between two well equipped sides. Lovett saved at point blank range from Trigg, who got the rebound but placed outside.

LAWTON GOAL FOR EVERTON
April 14, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
Blackpool Raids Repulsed
Lovett’s Escapes
By Stork.
Everton:- Lovett, goal; Cook (captain) and Greenhalgh, backs; Bentham, Mercer and Jackson, half-back; Bell, Catterick, Lawton, and Lyon, forward. Blackpool:- Strong, goal; Pope, and Hughes, backs; Russell, Whittaker, and Johnston, half-backs; Johnston, Buchan, Twigg, Jones, and Burbanks, forwards. Referee; Mr. H, Hartles, (Runcorn). Both teams showed several changes. T.E. Jones found that his ankle had turned bad again so was unable to play at centre half, the position being handled over to Mercer. A new position was found for George Jackson at left half. I understand that Jones is highly improbable for the representative game at Anfield next week. He joins the R.A.F, tomorrow, but it is the ankle injury which is likely to mark him absent. There was a fair attendance and the crowd saw Lawton make a shot in the first minute and open the way a second or two late for Catterick, whose shot, however, went wide. After Mercer had cut out a dangerous looking Blackpool advance, Johnson wasted a grand opportunity by allowing the ball to go out of play after his co-forwards had worked a nice opening for him. Lawton’s heading had been a feature this half, and he gave Lyon and Catterick further opportunities to break through the Blackpool defence. So far Burbanks had got little change out of Cook whereas Russell caused a flutter in the Everton camp when he dropped the ball on to the Everton crossbar, and Lovett in an effort to sweep it, misjudged the flight of the ball, missing it completely. Fortunately for him the ball swung away from Blackpool players waiting its arrival.
Lawton’s Leader.
In twenty minutes Everton had taken the lead. The goal followed a rather persistent Blackpool attack, the clearance coming from Bentham, who slipped the ball nicely through the middle to Catterick, who, in turn pushed it between the two Blackpool backs, Lawton dashed through and although angled, put his hot rights away from the Blackpool goalkeeper. The Everton goal had a narrow escape when Wilson Jones put the ball into the goalmouth, Lovett having to run out, and it seemed any odds on a goal, but Greenhalgh dropped back and headed clear. Catterick was inclined to over dribble, and this no doubt robbed him of goal, for Lawton had made a great opening for him. So far, Blackpool had been well tackled by the Everton defence.

LAWTON FINE SHOOTING
April 15, 1941. The Liverpool Daily Post
Everton 2, Blackpool 2
Everton Draw With Blackpool
By Stork.
Everton and Blackpool provided an entertaining game at Goodison Park, yesterday. The result was a draw, two goals apiece. The Everton followers considered they deserved a victory for they did most of the pressing in the second half. But one must overlook the fact that Blackpool had what they considered a good goal disallowed, while to counter-balance that there was the great shot by Lawton which grazed the crossbar. Blackpool exploited the open game, whereas Everton as usual, replied on close passing methods. Everton should have gone ahead very early in the game, for after Lawton had early in the game, for after Lawton had showed his great shooting power with a shot that missed its mark, he gave Catterick a chance of a lifetime, almost putting the ball on a plate to him, but Catterick failed to make use of it. Blackpool were the more keen to shoot and just after Lawton had scored in twenty minutes through fine collaboration by Bentham and Catterick, Jones almost equalised and would have done so had not Greenhalgh dropped back into goal and headed the ball from under the bar. Near the interval, Trigg was unfortunate when he banged the ball against Lovett’s body, collected the rebound then hooked the ball outside but at this point Blackpool played at forty three minutes it came. Trig scoring after Mercer had failed to hold up Johnson. In the second half so much enthusiasm came into play that several Blackpool players came under the ban of the referee. At fifty-five minutes Everton regained the lead, a pass by Lawton enabling Catterick to beat goalkeeper strong from close range. But Blackpool had not finished and Johnson shot hard and true into the Everton goal. The ball was kept out by the joint aid of Lovett and Greenhalgh, but went to Trigg who shot it back into the net. Blackpool’s disallowed goal came later. The referee considered that Lovett had been fouled before Trigg put the ball into the net. Had Lawton been supported strongly Everton would have won this match without any great difficulty. Everton:- Lovett, goal; Cook (captain) and Greenhalgh, backs; Bentham, Mercer and Jackson, half-back; Bell, Catterick, Lawton, and Lyon, forward. Blackpool:- Strong, goal; Pope, and Hughes, backs; Russell, Whittaker, and Johnston, half-backs; Johnston, Buchan, Twigg, Jones, and Burbanks, forwards. Referee; Mr. H, Hartles, (Runcorn).

FIERCE BATTLE.
April 15, 1941. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log
The Everton-Blackpool game produced one of the fiercest struggles I have seen this season. It was cut and thrust the whole 90 minutes and the 6,634 spectators, who paid more than £350, made sure they contributed to the general excitement. It was a fine afternoon’s sport, in which a much-shuffled Everton cam count themselves unfortunate not to win. How Blackpool survived during the last half an hour is a matter for wonder. Blackpool had to thank the ex-Kingstonian amateur Whittaker, Russell, Johnston and Hughes for holding out n Everton flung every man into attack –Cook, Greenhalgh, Mercer and all. The only man who was kept to defence was Lovatt in goal. It is a fact that both Cook and Greenhalgh, the full backs were up there shooting. There was little to chosen between the sides. Everton lacked the speedy development of Blackpool, who exploited the crossfield pass to such perfection that their wingers, Johnson and Burbanks were times and again out on their own. Everton’s defence was splendid, with Cook easily the best man on the field. Mercer was grand at centre-half, and Greenhalgh was perfect in invention and in his use of the ball. I liked the diligence of Bentham, and in attack there was nothing to approach the leadership of Tom Lawton. What a difference he makes to the line. Lawton gave Everton the lead, and after Trigg, the former Birmingham full back had equalised, Catterick accepted a peach of a Lawton opening to place the Blues in front again. It was Trigg who levelled the scores, and then Buchan had a goal disallowed for an infringement. It was 100 per cent action, and the one blot was the abundance of fouls.

EVERTON’S SHORTCOMINGS
April 15, 1941. The Liverpool Echo.
Ranger’s Notes.
Football results still defy the laws of logic and reason, just as ever they did. After drawing against the strong Blackpool side. Everton repeated Liverpool’s performance against Blackpool; drawing two each at Goodison in a game which was full of feeling if not finesse. A draw was the right result, for there was not a great deal between the two, in spite of Everton’s long spell of pressure in the second half. Lawton introduced much needed vigour into the home side’s attack, and with better backing from his forward colleagues might have pulled off a victory. In addition to some powerful shooting he piled his men with plenty of grand passes, but advantage was not taken of them. Catterick was the best through lameness slowed him down late on. Bell was a disappointment. Lovett was not as reliable as I have seen him, and it was a good job Cook, Greenhalgh and Mercer were up to their best standard. Everton will have to do better than this if they are to make a bid for the championship.

EVERTON’S FOURTEEN
April 16, 1941. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log
Everton have chosen 14 players to make the journey to Chesterfield on Saturday in the North regional match. The attack is not yet decided on. Maurice Lindley, now of the R.A.F will make his first appearance of the season. He has been playing with Bournemouth, but will be on leave and so appear at right half. Joe Mercer continues as deputy for Tommy Jones who reported for R.A.F duty yesterday, bit who will be home again on Friday. Jones, however, will not be able to play in the Anfield international owing to his ankle injury. That is definite. Harry Lindeman, the 19-year-old inside right from the “A” team may make his first team debut. Lindeman has been with the Blues since the formation of the “B” team in 1938. He is shortly joining the R.A.F. Everton (from); Lovett; Jackson, Greenhalgh; Lindley, Mercer, Watson; Jones (Jack), Bentham, Catterick, Bell, Lyon, Wyles, Simmons, H. Lindeman.
Everton “A” appear at Goodison Park against Rootes in the final match of the George Mahon Cup series at 3.15. Everton:- “A”:- Johnson; Ireland, Dugdale; Sherrett, Cheers, Atkins; Davies, Williams, Powell, Owen, Bailey. Cliff Britton, the Everton half-back who is now a Company Sergeant-Major in the Army, has been selected to play right half for England against Wales at Nottingham on April 26.

EVERTON’S EIGHT FORWARDS.
April 16, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
Ranger’s Notes
Everton, away to Chesterfield on Saturday have Jackson in place of Cook (playing at Anfield), and Lindley at right half. Forwards will be chosen from eight probables, among whom appears Lindeman a 19-year-old “A” teamer who has been showing good form of late. Team:- Everton (from); Lovett; Jackson, Greenhalgh; Lindley, Mercer, Watson; Jones (Jack), Bentham, Catterick, Bell, Lyon, Wyles, Simmons, H. Lindeman.

LONGEST JOURNEY
April 18, 1941. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log
Everton undertake their longest journey of the season tomorrow when they go to Chesterfield for the return North regional game. When the teams met at Goodison Park recently Chesterfield won by the only goal. The Blues have a chance of winning the North regional competition, but it is going to take a big effort if they are to overhaul Preston North End, the new leaders. Everton (from); - Lovett; Jackson, Greenhalgh; Lindley, Mercer, Watson; Jones (Jack), Bentham, J.Powell, Bell, Lyons, Wyles, Simmons, H. Lindeman.

EVERTON’S HOPE
April 18, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
Ranger’s Notes.
Everton who suffered a surprise defeat by Chesterfield at Goodison a fortnight ago, will week to reverse that decision when they pay a return visit to Chesterfield. Team from; Lovett; Jackson, Greenhalgh; Lindley, Mercer, Watson; Jones (Jack), Bentham, J.Powell, Bell, Lyons, Wyles, Simmons, H. Lindeman.

CHESTERFIELD V EVERTON
April 19, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
By Stork.
Chesterfield:- Middleton, goal; Milburn and Kidd, backs; Hartley, Bringle and Sutherland, half-backs; Hunt, Broom, Milligan, Jones and Lyman, forwards. Everton:- Lovett, goal; Jackson and Greenhalgh (captain), half-backs; Lindley, Mercer and Watson, half-backs; Wyles, Verton, Powell, Lyons and Jones (JE), forwards. Referee: Mr. J. Flanagan of Sheffield. Everton had an old score to wipe out at Chesterfield, who had scored a surprise victory at Goodison Park. Lindley made his first appearance of the season. Chesterfield were strongly represented. The home side almost took a goal in the first minute, Brown, the Aston Villa player, providing Milligan with a great chance, but he shot a yard wide. He tried again a minute or two later but was again off the mark. A slip by Jackson opened the way for Hunt who, however, failed to collect the ball. Chesterfield’s football was good, and they claimed a penalty which was obviously a case of ball-to-hand. So far Everton’s attack had been held up rather easily. Everton’s first shot came from Jones, who hit the side netting just after Hunt had made an oblique shot which did not carry enough power. Lyman put a lot more behind his drive, and Lovett had to be content to pat the ball down, and then complete his clearance. Hunt offered another glorious opening to Thomas, but he shot over. Chesterfield kept the ball moving with wide passes, the forwards getting good support from the half-backs. Middleton’s first handling case was from a centre by Wyles. The first fifteen minutes belonged to Chesterfield, and the Everton defence had to do some hard work. The speed of Chesterfield, was one of the features of their success. They did not hold the ball but passed, it along first time to a better-placed colleagues. Milligan scored for Chesterfield after 22 minutes.

EVERTON BELOW FORM.
April 21, 1941. The Liverpool Daily Post
Chesterfield 4, Everton 1
Chesterfield Win again.
By Stork.
Everton’s bid to wipe out Chesterfield’s Goodison Park victory a week previously failed, for the Derbyshire team won an even more convincing victory than in the first instance, and deserved it, for they were the better side. With the slightest bit of luck they would have improved on their 4-1 successes. Everton’s play was poor. Even admitting that there was a fair sprinkling of youth in the side, one could not get away from the fact that Everton are in for a thin time unless more experience and weight is brought into the attack. Never at any point, did their forward line promise to be troublesome to the Chesterfield defence, which easily held the Everton attack at bay. The experiment of playing the “A” team centre forward was anything but a success. He was never in the game with a chance, and was obviously not ready for such a test.
Forward Changes.
Many forward changes were made during the progress of the game, but not until Wyles was transferred to the centre forward berth did Everton reduce Chesterfield’s four goals lead, Wyles took his goal well, but that, with the exception of a header by Lyon, brilliantly saved by Middleton was the only time the Chesterfield defence had need to be anxious. Chesterfield have a good side. They scored four goals (Middleton 2, Hunt and Lyman) and should have had another, and would have done had it not been for some goalkeeping by Lovett. Milligan one of the most vigorous centre-forwards in the game, actually failed from the penalty spot, but he gave the Everton defence a worrying time by his Dodds-like rushes down the middle, but it was Broome the Aston Villa inside forward and Jones formerly South Liverpool, who made the Chesterfield forward line such a success. Both had the ball long enough to draw the defence and then despatched it with a rare accuracy to wingmen who were fleet of foot and sure with the centres. Everton had no forward with any punch, so the game became a duel between Everton’s defence and Chesterfield’s attack. Chesterfield:- Middleton, goal; Milburn and Kidd, backs; Hartley, Bringle and Sutherland, half-backs; Hunt, Broom, Milligan, Jones and Lyman, forwards. Everton:- Lovett, goal; Jackson and Greenhalgh (captain), half-backs; Lindley, Mercer and Watson, half-backs; Wyles, Verton, Powell, Lyons and Jones (JE), forwards. Referee: Mr. J. Flanagan of Sheffield.
• Lawton scored a hat-trick Football League and Stevenson for the All British X1 The Football league winning 9-7 at Anfield, Cook also playing for the British X1

EXPERIEMENT TOLD
April 21, 1941. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Logs.
The greater experience of Chesterfield was the deciding factor in their 4-1 defeat of Everton. Strengthened by the inclusion of Lyman (Tottenham) and Broome (Aston Villa), they possessed better understanding than Everton’s young team. Everton opened promisingly enough and had it not been for the brilliance of Middleton in the Chesterfield goal. Powell and Wyles must have been among the scorers. Later the Blues were worn down by a powerful combination. The duels between Mercer and Milligan constituted a feature of the game.

EVERTON’S WEAKNESSES
April 21, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
By Stork.
Everton’s forward problem increases. Since the departure of Lawton, Stevenson and Boyes the attack has been Everton’s one big worry. Jackie Lyon filled Boyes’s place with credit, but Lawton’s position is going to be a headache, for there is no one on their books who can fill such important boots. The forward line which went to Chesterfield was probably the most ineffective to ever don an Everton jersey, and never had a chance of scoring a victory for there was neither the ability nor the weight necessary to break down a defence of any quality. From the word “go” Everton were on the defensive. How could it be otherwise with an attack which was mastered without any great effort, and had Chesterfield scored more than four goals they would have been settled to them. They missed a penalty, failed to score several “sitters” and Lovett saved many good shots. The game ultimately resulted in a battle between Everton’s defence and Chesterfield’s forwards –aye, sometimes the full back and half backs came up to deliver a shot –and the forwards won.

TWO GOALS A MATCH
April 22, 1941. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log
Jack Powell, the Everton “A” team leader has all the promise of making a good player and the very fact that he had a run with the seniors will do him a lot-of-good. Powell found himself crowned out as leader of the attack and did much better when he was moved to outside-left. He had more room in which to operate and more time in which to act. Everton can afford to be patient with this lad, for he has only just turned 16. He is the son of Mr. Powell, the chairman of Witton Albion, and he seems to be a star of the future. He has enjoyed tremendous success with the Blues “A” team; in fact he has bagged 22 goals in nine games. That gives him an average of more than two goals a game. Of course, in one game he secured nine goals out of 10.

EVERTON PLAYER CAPPED.
April 24, 1941. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log
Torry Gillick and Jimmy Caskie the Everton wingers, now playing with Rangers and St. Mirren respectively, have been selected to play for Scotland against England in the international match at Hampton Park, Glasgow on May 3. Both have been honoured before.

CENTURY BID
April 25, 1941. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Pilot.
New Brighton will make a big effort to reach their century of League goals this season when they face Everton at Rake-lane tomorrow in the North Regional games. The Rakes have scored 97 goals in League games this season –more than any other club North or South. What is more a win for the Rakers will gave them a real chance of gaining the distinction of finishing higher in the league chart than any of the Merseyside teams. Everton have struck a bad match, and, in fact, their Liverpool Cup win at Southport is the only victory they can claim for some weeks. The Rakers will field the forward line, which has been scoring all the goals, but the defence is not yet decided on. It is possible that Tommy Jones, the Blues Welsh international centre half, will be able to play. He has made a good recovery from his ankle injury. He is included in the 14 players from whom Everton will make the final selection. Curiously enough, the Rakers goalkeeper will be Burnett, who is on loan to them from Everton. Everton (from); Lovett; Cook, Greenhalgh; Mercer, Jones (Tom), Watson; Finnis, Bentham, Catterick, Lyon, Lindeman, Wyles, Jackson.

EVERTON AT RAKE LANE.
April 25, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
Ranger’s Notes.
Everton, too, will have to put their best foot forward to bring home a victory from New Brighton. With the departure of Lawton all the sting has gone out of the attack, and though the defence, even minus Tommy Jones, is good enough to keep the goals against down to reasonable proporations, the absence of them on the credit side, on a goal average computation may soon result in a big slide down the League ladder. Already Everton have dropped to sixth position; and have a lot of leeway to make up if their championship hopes are not to lade altogether. Everton include T.G. Jones provisionally, in the hope his ankle will be fit in time, so Wale’s loss may be Everton’s game. Teams from:- Everton:- Lovett; Cook, Greenhalgh; Mercer, Jones (T), Watson, Finnis; Bentham, Lindaman, Catterick, Stevenson, Lyon, Wyles, Jackson. New Brighton; Burnett; A.N. Other, Lowe; Dooley, Gregson, Hill; Chedgzoy, Waring, Frost, Malam, Hanson.

PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALLERS
April 26, 1941. The Evening Express.
Present Policy Should Stand.
The clubs of the Football League at the last annual meeting turned down a suggestion of the Management Committee that professionalism should be suspended this season. Only 16 clubs voted for amateurism and 26 against. I do not think the Management Committee will bring the point up again when the clubs meet for their annual meeting in a few week’s time. As a matter of fact I do not think it is necessary. The point is that the clubs themselves are gradually moving towards the inclusion of amateurs in their sides. It is being done for a twofold reason. In the first place they save finance, and secondly by playing amateurs they are discovering stars of the future and giving them the experience which is necessary. Our Merseyside clubs have, for the most part, decided to encourage the young amateurs, who must constitute the basis of team-building when normal times return.

EVERTON AT RAKE-LANE
April 26, 1941. The Evening Express.
Blues’ Better Method
By Watcher.
New Brighton introduced two amateurs –E. Banks, Halsall, and H. Ashurst, from Burscough –to their sides against Everton at Rake-lane today. New Brighton:- Burnett (Everton), goal; E. Banks, and Lowe, backs; H. Ashurst, Gregson, and Hill, half-backs; Chedgzoy, Waring, Frost, Malam, Hanson (captain) , forwards. Everton:- Lovett, goal; Cook (captain) and Greenhalgh, backs; Bentham, Jones and Watson, half-backs; Wyles, Mercer, Catterick, Lindemam, and Lyon, forwards. Referee;- H. Hartles (Runcorn). Hanson won the toss for New Brighton, who were playing up the slope, and Mercer, in the strange position of inside-right, started a movement which led to the first Everton attack. Progress was made by Wykes but the ball was put over the bar. When the next raid was made, this time by Lyon, the delay in getting the ball across gave Banks time to intervene. The Rakers’ first attack found Greenhalgh ready for Waring and the former New Brighton full-back won the duel. Both Everton wings took part in a good movement which ended in Catterick heading just wide. The most difficult save Burnett had to make so far, however, was from his own centre-half, Gregson who kicked the wrong way in an attempt to divert a centre by Lyon. Little had been seen in these first few minutes of the Rakers’ attack, which needed only three goals to achieve 100 for the season, but there was one move which led to a corner and some activity in front of the Everton goal, but the Blues finally got away and resumed the attack. They were playing more constructively and with better method than the Rakers. A Hanson pass to Waring looked dangerous at one time, but as soon as Waring received there was a rush of Everton defenders and Lovett eventually cleared. Catterick scored for Everton in 15 minutes.

NEW BRIGHTON V EVERTON
April 26, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
By Stork.
New Brighton:- Burnett (Everton), goal; E. Banks, and Lowe, backs; H. Ashurst, Gregson, and Hill, half-backs; Chedgzoy, Waring, Frost, Malam, Hanson (captain) , forwards. Everton:- Lovett, goal; Cook (captain) and Greenhalgh, backs; Bentham, Jones and Watson, half-backs; Wyles, Mercer, Catterick, Lindemam, and Lyon, forwards. Referee;- H. Hartles (Runcorn). Against New Brighton, at Rake Lane, today, Everton brought Mercer into the forward line, which also included Lindeman of the “A” team. T.E. Jones recovered from his injured ankle, occupied his regular position. Everton progressed by sound football tactics in which Lindeman showed much promises. The first goal incident was a header by Catterick, after Lindeman and Lyon and worked out a nice position for the Everton centre forward. So far the New Brighton attack with the galaxy of stars, had failed to find a loophole in Everton’s defence, whereas Mercer, by some judicious passing, had opened the way on several occasions for possible shots at goal. Burnett made one good save from his own centre half, who had passed back rather rapidly in an Everton advance. Everton scored in 15 minutes. A glorious dribble by Lyon along the goalline brought, it his final pass to Catterick leaving the Everton centre forward with a simple task.

FOUR GOALS FOR EVERTON
April 28, 1941. The Liverpool Daily Post
New Brighton 0, Everton 4
New Brighton Attack Fails.
By Stork.
Everton, without being a brilliant side, were much too big a handiful for New Brighton, at Rake Lane, and were ready winners by four goals to nothing. The New Brighton forward line, which has been the backbone of the team throughout the season, scoring liberally against several of the best clubs in the section, could do nothing against the Everton defence, which handled it so completely that the Everton goalkeeper had a comparatively easy afternoon’s work. There must come a time when even an attack which contains such men as Waring. Hanson and others must yield to superior strength and when that is the case at New Brighton the Rakers defence is not what I oughts to be. On Saturday they could notwithstand the powerful drives of the Everton forwards, so that they were unable to render any help to their own attack. The business was purely defensive it was not enough. Everton showed how easy it was to frame attacks against an uncertain defence. Let me take the first goal of the day. It was started by a youngster named Lyon, who dribbled the ball right along the goalline beating three men in turn, and then slipped the ball on to the penalty spot where Catterick did the needful. It was a great bit of cheek, but just went to prove the equality of New Brighton’s defence. Three other goals were scored in the second half by Mercer, Wyles, and Lyons, and there would have been others had it not been for Burnett the Rakers goalkeeper, who is by right an Everton player. New Brighton had their chances; never will Frost have an easier one than when he got the better of Jones, ran round Lovett and was left with a gaping goal to shoot into but delayed his effort all too long for Greenhalgh tackled him successfully. Chedzgoy did hit the woodwork but New Brighton’s goal efforts were all too seldom and too weak. Lindeman, the 18 years old Everton “A” team player, showed a glimpse of good-class football, and his link-up with Lyon could be said to be successful. He had only one fault, he was a little tender, but as he grows this fault will no doubt leave him. New Brighton:- Burnett (Everton), goal; E. Banks, and Lowe, backs; H. Ashurst, Gregson, and Hill, half-backs; Chedgzoy, Waring, Frost, Malam, Hanson (captain) , forwards. Everton:- Lovett, goal; Cook (captain) and Greenhalgh, backs; Bentham, Jones and Watson, half-backs; Wyles, Mercer, Catterick, Lindemam, and Lyon, forwards. Referee;- H. Hartles (Runcorn).
• Britton played for England against Wales at Nottingham, England winning 4-1.

EVERTON’S WIN
April 28, 1941. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log
Everton winning 4-0 at New Brighton smashed the Rakers’ unbeaten home record and had the distinction of preventing the League’s most prolific goal-getters from scoring on their own ground. None contributed more towards this achievement than Jones outstanding at centre-half, and Greenhalgh, who played well against his own club. Everton’s scoring was started after fifteen minutes by Catterick. Further goals followed in the second half from Wyles, Mercer (quite at home in his unaccumosted position as inside right) and Lyons.

RAKERS’ FORWARDS CHECKED
April 28, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
By Stork.
The pride of New Brighton, the Rakers’ forward line, claimed by some to be the best attack in the Northern Section –it has certainly carried the club’s flag pretty high this season –was badly jammed by Everton on Saturday. Its failure to function in its customary style was due to two things, the Everton defence and the inability of their half backs to render any constructional aid. Frost and company could not be expected to frame attacks and help in defence at the same time, but that is what they had to do against Everton, and it was too much for them. Everton, without being brilliant, were undeniably the better craftsmen. They had more constructional ability than their adversaries, and many many more shots. Only twice did the Rakers produce any real trouble for Lovett –a shot from Frost and then an unforgivable miss by the same player after he had lured the Everton ‘keeper from his lair.

EVERTON’A CUP TEAM.
April 30, 1941. The Evening Express
Pilot’s Log
Everton resume activities in the Lancashire Cup on Saturday, when they oppose Burnley in the second leg of the second round tie. The Blues hold a goal lead, having won 3-2 at Turf Moor some time ago. The winners will go forward to face Blackpool in the semi-final on May 10 for the right to face Manchester United in the final on May 17. Everton will be without Joe Mercer, who will be helping England against Scotland in the Hampden Park international but Tommy Jones, now fully recovered from his ankle injury, will be at centre-half. Stan Bentham goes to right half for Mercer and Sid Simmons appears at inside right as partner to Wyles. Alex Stevenson has received permission to play and his inclusion will mean a lot of difference to the attack. Everton:- Lovett; Cook, Greenhalgh; Bentham, Jones (Tom), Watson; Wyles, Simmons, Catterick, Stevenson, Lyon.
Everton “A” go to Runcorn to oppose M.S. Randle in a Wavertree Cup-tie with the following team. Johnson; Ireland, Dugdale; Sherratt, Cheers, Atkins; Sumner, Williams, Powell, Owen, Bailey.

EVERTON BACK TO CUP FARE
April 30, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
Rangers’ Notes
Everton resume Cup warfare this week-end, when they meet Burnley in the second leg of the second round Lancashire Senior Cup-tie. The first of the two games was played at Turf Moor at the end of January. Everton winning 3-2 so they start at Goodison a goal up, a lead which if maintained will see then through to the semi-final fight against Blackpool, the winners of which, will meet Manchester United in the final. A couple of months ago this would have seemed a comparatively easy passenger for Everton, but today the position has changed, and against Burnley’s young and bustling side the Blues will have to go all out to keep in front. Teams: Everton:- Lovett; Cook, Greenhalgh; Bentham, Jones (Tom), Watson; Wyles, Simmons, Catterick, Stevenson, Lyon.
Everton “A” go to Runcorn to oppose M.S. Randle in a Wavertree Cup-tie with the following team. Johnson; Ireland, Dugdale; Sherratt, Cheers, Atkins; Sumner, Williams, Powell, Owen, Bailey.

 

April 1941