Everton Independent Research Data

 

EVERTON MAKE GALLANT FLIGHT
February 1, 1913. The Evening Express
By The Critic
Everton live to fight another day and I fancy they will make no mistake on Wednesday, I extend congratulations to Everton on making so good a flight against odds, and I am sure enthusiasts will relish the opportunity of witnessing the replay on Wednesday when the kick-off is timed for 2.45. Those who fancied Everton had a walk over at Brighton would have changed their mind when they saw the sturdy trustful way the home team opened the game and though Everton no doubt would have won had they remained at full strength the “Blues” under the circumstances which are by this time well known did extremely well and I am sure everybody concerned were well satisfied with a draw. True Everton had their chances in the first half and the inside forwards failed to drive home their shots with their usual vigour but the ground was very slippery and the wet ball skidded about in disconcerting fashion. I have seen Browell take chances with greater smartness than he did in the opening half on Saturday and he missed one or two good openings but one must allow that the home backs were very and they are not novices by any means.

Bradshaw's Misfortune
I though the “Blues” were just beginning to settle down when Bradshaw unfortunately overreached himself and tore the muscles of his thigh. He retired but returned in a few minutes. Bradshaw was greatly upset at not being able to assist his colleagues and though he struggled gamely he found that he could be of no assistance and he retired for good just before the in interval. It must be mentioned that Bradshaw was injured in the first ten minutes or so and thus the Blues were handicapped almost from the first especially as Grenyer was also injured. Still they held the upper hand in the first half and but for weak finishing they must have enjoyed a lead. Still if Everton missed so did Brighton and Simpson just before the interval allowed the chance of the match to slip away. He received the ball to the right of the goal in a very favourable position but he could only shoot over the bar.

A Rare Struggle
It was in the second half however that the real struggle was witnessed. Everton had their backs to the wall and with ten men one of whom limped very badly, they played on gamely against a determined side. Several times it looked a box of cigars to a cigarette paper on Brighton scoring, but they were wild, and their affords near goal for the most part were ill timed. But Everton set their teeth and played so strongly that they kept the Brightonians at hay till the finish. Even with their weakened resource the Blues made several dangerous raids. Beare being the main attacker and once George almost won the game with a shot which travelled at a terrific pace and which was touched over the bar by Whiting. Had the winger kept the ball a bit lower Whiting would never have seen it. The whistle came as a welcome relief.

The Players
I have nothing but praise for the Everton defence. I have never seen Caldwell play so well. He was very confidence from the start and the dealing with shot never caused the least anxiety. One or two of his saves were really fine. Macconnachie was the best back on the field, and he was ably seconded by Stevenson whilst the halves worked very hard during a trying time. Wareing was the outstanding figure but Val Harris was not far behind and Grenyer despite his injuries –he was knocked out threes –stuck to his task in heroic fashion. Near the end he dashed in though limping, and twice by desperate efforts he cleared with big kicks. The inside forwards left something to be desired, but the wing men did exceptionally well, avidison was very much in the picture. I have not seen him play a better game. He centred promptly and in addition tested the keeper pretty often in the first half. Beare, too, was at his best, and his centres deserved a better fate. Browell was not seen to advantage but Jefferis combined with Beare exceedingly well, I can tell you that Brighton will make a good show on Wednesday. They have a fine half-back line and a good defence. Whiting saved some fine shots and Leeming to still a general Booth and McGhie are very good. The forwards lacked finish, and Longstaff did not play up no expectations. They will be a good game on Wednesday and I may say that tickets may be obtained at Messrs Rushworth and Dreaper's Basnett street and Islington.

February 1, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool
Both Liverpool's clubs commenced the journey south late yesterday, all the players being reported fit and well, and the respective teams remaining unchanged from last week. Brighton Hove Albion have been defeated only once on their own ground this season. But Everton players have every confidence of being able to follow the example of Southampton, Liverpool and Middlesbrough in winning Cup-ties at the southern health resort.

Blues at Brighton
All's well in the Everton camp and although, it is realise, that a big task awaits them at Hove, there is a quiet feeling of confidence in the ability of the Blues, Brighton hold a big advantage in playing on their own ground, and as they are bound to strain every effort in order to improve their financial resources which on appearance in the third round would ensure, they are likely to press Everton hard. Sourthern League football, it is said is not far removed in point of quality from the First league standard, and Brighton people believe in the ability of their team to give Everton a good game, and probably win. At the same time Everton at their best are a clever side, and allowing for the disadvantage of playing on strange ground they ought not to be beaten. The Brighton halves are strong, and if the Goodison forwards get the measure of the middle line they ought to win. As I have previously indicated in the case of a draw at both Hove and Plumstead the clubs will toss for the right to play on Wednesday. Of course if there should be but one drawn game I presume Wednesday is certain to be the date of the replay. However, I hope to be able to record a double victory, which would be so much better than “undecided” - or anything else.

The teams.
The Everton team is as fresh as the most exacting desire, and the side will turn out as follows: - Caldwell; Stevenson and MaConnachie; Harris, Wareing, and Grenyer; Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, and Davidson. Brighton and Hove: - Whiting; Spencer and Leeming; Booth, McGhee, and Higham; Longstaff, Simpson, Miller, Webb, and Needham. Quite a few enthusiasts are making the journey south and for the convenience of Everton and Liverpool club followers Messrs C.W. Bullock and Co., 22, Lime Street will be open from 10 to 11-30 tonight for the sale of tickets.

EVERTON
February 1 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool.
“Blues” at Brighton.
Visitors' Bad Luck.
Players Injured & Penalty Kick Denied.
No Goals in Desperate Game.
By the Critic.
The weather was fine when the Everton players arrived at the southern resort this morning. They had travelled to London on Friday evening, accompanied by Directors Whitford, Kirkwood, Clayton, Coffey, Allman and Wade. The run to Brighton was made in good time, and the players were all reported fit. In the event of a draw the game will be replayed at Goodison Park on Wednesday. Quite a goodly number of Everton supporters were present at the match. At 12.30 the weather had turned showery, and there was a stiff breeze blowing. The teams were: - Brighton: - Whiting, goal, Spencer, and Leeming (captain), backs, Booth, McGhie, and Higham, half-backs, Longstaff, Simpson, Miller, Webb, and Middleton, forwards. Everton: - Caldwell, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (captain), backs, Harris, Wareing, and Grenyer, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, and Davidson, forwards. Referee E.W.Child.

The weather turned out very unfavourable, a drizzling rain falling, but the ground was in fair conditions, and there would be about 12,000 spectators present at the start.
Brighton's Early Raid.
Everton won the toss. Brighton made the first move, and Wareing slipped in endeavouring to get the ball away, but Stevenson cleared, and Everton obtained a footing in the home half, but no damage was done, and the home team made a raid which looked dangerous, especially when MaConnachie's kick cannoned off Millar close in, but Caldwell was at hand, and he kicked down the field. From a throw in Browell put over the bar. Millar dashed down the centre, and MaConnachie with a timely tackle stopped the rush. The proceedings then opened fast, and each end was visited in turn. The greasy ball required a deal of controlling. The first shot of note came from Webb of Brighton, who, was only a couple of feet wide with a grand drive, and immediately afterwards from a beautiful pass from Bradshaw, Browell looked like going through, but he was spoiled at the last moment. Brighton were playing typical Cup-tie football, and Longstaff dashed down the wing to send in.

A Terrific Shot.
Which Caldwell kicked out, McGhie fired in again however, and this time Caldwell saved cleverly near the post. Everton met with misfortune when Bradshaw retired injured. The inside left apparently strained the muscle of his leg, and though he returned after a few minutes' absence he limped badly, and were undoubtedly handicapped. However, they were holding their own, and one centre from Davidson was luckily cleared. Browell was afforded a fine opportunity from a pass from Bradshaw, but the Everton centre

Missed His Kick
As he attempted to take the ball on the drop. The home right wing Simpson and Longstaff were playing well, and they occasioned considerable trouble to the Everton defence. It was a ding-dong struggle. Davidson once called on Whiting, but the keeper saved cleverly at the foot of the post. The Everton forwards had not up to now been able to overcome the sturdy half-back line opposed to them, but despite his injury, Bradshaw rendered useful service. Everton attacked with vigour, and there were one or two exciting incidents in the Brighton goal, but Whiting was proving a capable custodian, and he foiled the Evertonian efforts to get through. He was particularly smart in picking up a ground shot from Davidson. On the whole the Blues enjoyed the bulk of the pressure during the first half hour, but the Brighton defence stood out well, Leeming and Spencer offering an effective resistance. Beare ran down the wing but he spoiled his chance by kicking too far forward. The

Ground Cut Up Badly
And the players found difficulty in keeping their feet. There was no denying which was the cleverest side, Everton holding the advantage in point of skill, and some nice play was witnessed on occasions. Whiting was kept fully employed, and he was called on by Beare with a very fine shot. Wareing and Grenyer next tried to get through. Brighton for some time did not make any impression on Everton defence, the left wing failing badly on one occasion. The rain was now pouring down, and the conditions were very dismal. Grenyer sustained an injury to his ankle and he retired. This was further bad luck for Everton. He soon returned, however. The visitors made a strenuous appeal for a penalty against a Brighton player for holding Bradhsaw, but the referee did not see the incident, and after an appeal to the linesman the ruling official decided in Brighton's favour. It was a palpable offence. Just before the interval Browell missed a good chance from Beare's centre, and Simpson shot over the bar. Bradshaw again retired before the interval.

Half-time Everton 0 Brighton & Hove 0
Everton had undoubtedly the better of the first half, but the home defence prevailed I learned during the interval that Bradshaw had torn the muscles of his thigh rather badly and he had continued to play under difficulties. Grenyer too, was limping, and the Blues were thus a tremendous disadvantage. Under the circumstances they had done remarkably well.

Four Forwards.
Bradshaw was unable to resume, and Everton were thus left with ten men to contest the second half. The Blues played four forwards, with Grenyer still in his place. Brighton were the first to make an incursion, but Middleton put behind. Coming again, however, McGhie sent in a low shot, which Caldwell cleared. The Everton keeper further distinguished himself by a really smart save from Longstaff , with several opponents around him. Everton were being badly assailed, and when Miller had a chance he shot wide. From a neat pass by Jefferis, Beare raced to the other end and forced a corner off Leeming, but this was cleared. Brighton were playing very strongly, and Higham was next to put by the post. The Blues were feeling the absence of Bradshaw very keenly, but the visiting half-backs allowed little scope. Wareing especially proving a thorn in the homesters' side. A free kick against Grenyer was safely got away by Harris, and Beare ran down the wing, forcing Leeming to kick back to Whiting. Brighton were soon back again, and Miller sent in a low shot which Caldwell caught and cleared. Everton improved, and from a centre by Beare, Whiting punched out. Harris drove in hard, but the shot lacked direction. At the other end Simpson shot

Right Across the Goal.
When an excellent chance presented, itself, Beare again changed the venue, and after tricking Higham, and Leeming he centred finely, and Davidson caught the ball near the post and placed just over the bar. It was a fine effort on the part of Beare, Brighton's finishing left a lot to be desired, otherwise they might have gained the lead. The Everton ten contested the issue strongly, and Beare was to the fore. His pass went to Jefferis, but the inside right could do no better than shoot over from a difficult position. Brighton forced two successive corners, and from the second of these Grenyer cleared with a big kick. Final result Brighton 0 Everton 0. The replay will take place at Goodison Park next Wednesday.

BRIGHTON HOVE ALBION 0 EVERTON 0
February 3 1913. The Liverpool Courier.
EVERTON'S UPHILL STRUGGLE.
BLUES FORCE A DRAW WITH TEN MEN.
The game at the Goldstone-road Ground. Hove, proved a very strenuous one under most miserable conditions. During the greater part of the contest rain fell, and the ground although well covered with grass, was rendered very slippery. Despite this drawback, however, the pace was fast, and the bout was waged on typical cup-tie lines, both sides exerting themselves to the utmost, and a draw gave a correct idea of the run of the play. When it is said that for the greater part of the game Everton were minus the services of Bradshaw, and that Grenyer sustained an injury to his leg which handicapped him considerably, it will be seen that Everton were fighting against odds, and in forcing a replay at Goodison Park on Wednesday they accomplished a meritorious performance. Throughout the second half they laboured on with ten men against a sturdy, determined team which required a lot of shaking off; but the backs stuck to their guns in rare style, and succeeded in keeping their charge intact, although it must be said that the home forwards did not make the most of their opportunities. The strongest part of the Brighton team was the defence, the halves being very good indeed and with four forwards, it may be imagined how difficult it was for Everton to make headway. Still, the Blues made several dangerous raids on the right, and more than once a goal seemed likely. Beare was very prominent with flashes down the wing and accurate centres which, with Bradshaw fit and well in his place must been turned to account. Indeed, once Beare nearly won the game in the closing stages, as he drove in a fine ball, which Whiting just succeeded in tipping over the ball.

MISFORTUNES NEVER COME SINGLY.
The Blues were undoubtedly unfortunate in having two of their players injured, whilst it was also hard luck that the ruling official failed to notice an infringement of the rules in the Brighton penalty area. It certainly appeared that Everton were entitled to a penalty kick, but despite a very confident appeal by nearly the whole of the Everton team the referee, after consulting the linesmen, decided against the visitors. This occurred in the first half, when Everton had the better of the exchanges. With the front line handicapped however, they were unable to force home the advantage. Browell had his chance in the initial portion, but it was not one of the centre forward's best days. The forwards on both sides found it extremely difficult to control the ball as it skidded on occasion in most disconcerting fashion. The defenders judged the pace and flight much better, and they carried off the honours of the day.

A PLUCKY DISPLAY.
To Everton much credit is due for their untiring efforts and for their determined and plucky display against the frowns of Dame Fortune. Brighton played well up to a point, but was quite evident that the forwards were not as effective as the half-backs. Simpson and Longstaff did some useful work, but they did not play up to expectations. Macconnachie played one of his best games and during the steady pressure in the second half rendered excellent services. He had a capable partner in Stevenson, who was very sure in his kicking while Caldwell has rarely kept goal with so much confidence. He had some ticklish shots, to save, even though they came from long range, and he never occasioned the least anxiety. One save from Longstaff in the second portion of the game was a really fine effort. It was a high ball driven in with great force, and Caldwell had to first stop the ball and follow up, whilst surrounded by opponents, in order to effect a clearance.

STEADY HALF-BACK PLAY.
The halves were steady, with Wareing, perhaps, the most effective. Harris, as usual, was in the thick of the fray, and Grenyer, who was injured no fewer than three times, worked heroically under difficulties. Once he dashed in during a Brighton raid near the finish to clear a dangerous situation with a big kick. Beare and Davidson were the best forwards, the wingmen putting in some very fine centres. Beare, ably fed by Harris and Jefferis made many praiseworthy efforts in the second half, and Davidson has rarely played better than he did on this occasion, particularly during the brief period that he had the services of Bradshaw. Brighton are a good team, possessing a fine defence, and they will make a bold bid in the replay on Wednesday. Whiting in goal made some capital saves, and Leeming's generalship came in very useful. The halves were all good, McGhie and Booth being particularly effective. There were 14,000 spectators present, and the receipts amounted to £775. Teams : - Brighton: - Whiting, goal, Spencer, and Leeming (captain), backs, Booth, McGhie, and Higham, half-backs, Longstaff, Simpson, Miller, Webb, and Middleton, forwards. Everton: - Caldwell, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (Captain), backs, Harris, Wareing, and Grenyer, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, and Davidson, forwards. Referee E.W.Child.

EVERTON RESERVES 2 LIVERPOOL RESERVES 2
February 3, 1913. The Liverpool Courier.
CENTRAL LEAGUE (Game 25)
Fully 20,000 spectators assembled at Goodison Park to witness the reserves teams of Everton and Liverpool do battle for points. The game resulted in a draw of two goals each, a fair indication of the run of the play. It was a good hard fight for point, and until the last, kick of the game the issue was full of possibilities. Everton opened with several spirited attacks, in which Smith played a prominent part, and within seven minutes from the start Simms defeated Scott from close quarters. Everton had the best of matters for some time, but Scott and his backs managed to thwart all their best endeavours. Eventually play veered round in Liverpool's favour, and after twenty minutes' play Welfare equalised the scores. After the interval end to endplay was the order, but after twenty minutes Tosswill placed Liverpool ahead with a fine oblique drive. There was an abundance of exciting situations in the concluding stages, and eventually Brannick equalised. The best part of the home side was the defence, for the forwards lacked combination and steadiness, Smith being the only noticeable man in the line. On the Liverpoo side Welfare played a very fine game, and he was well backed up by Purcell, who played a clever and effective game at centre-half. Everton: - Hodge, goal, Holbem, and Page, backs, A. Browell (Captain), Fleetwood, and Simpson, half-backs, Smith, Brannick, Simms, Johnson, and Steven, forwards.

EVERTON MAKE GALLANT FLIGHT
February 3, 1913, Evening Express, Liverpool
By the Critic.
Everton live to fight another day and I fancy they will make no mistake on Wednesday. I extend congratulations to Everton on making so good a fight against odds, and I am sure enthusiasts will relish the opportunity of witnessing the replay on Wednesday when the kick-off is timed for 2-45 these who fancied Everton had a walk over, a Brighton would have changed their tune when they was the sturdy, trustful way the home team opened the game, and though Everton no doubt would have won had they remained at full strength, the “Blues” under the circumstances, which are by this time well known, did extremely well, and I am sure everybody concerned were well satisfied with a draw. True Everton had their chances in the first half and the inside forwards failed to drive home their shots with heir usual vigour, but the ground was very slippery and the wet ball skidded about in disconcerting fashion. I have seen Browell take chances with greater smartness than he did in the opening half on Saturday, and he missed one or two good openings, but one must allow that the home backs, were very keen and they are not novices by any means.

Bradshaw's Misfortune.
I thought the “Blues” were just beginning to settle down when Bradshaw unfortunately overreached himself and tore the muscles of his thigh. He retired, but returned in a few minutes. Bradshaw was greatly upset at not being able to assist his colleagues, and though he struggled gamely he found that he could be of no assistance and he retired for good just before the interval. It must be mentioned that Bradshaw was injured in the first ten minutes or so and thus the Blues were handicapped almost from the first, especially as Grenyer was also injured. Still they held the upper hand in the first half and but for weak finishing they must have enjoyed a lead. Still, if Everton missed so did Brighton, and Simpson just before the interval allowed the chance of the match to sip away. He received the ball to the right of the goal in a very favourable position but he could shoot over the bar.

A Rare Struggle.
It was in the second half, however, that the real struggle was witnessed. Everton had their backs to the wall, and with ten men, one of whom limped very badly they played on gamely against a determined side. Several times it looked a box of cigars to a cigarette paper on Brighton scoring, but they were wild, and their efforts near goal for the most part were ill timed. But Everton set their teeth and played so strongly that they kept the Birmingham at bay till the finish. Even with their weekend resources the Blues made several dangerous raids, Beare being the main attacked, and once George almost won the game with a shot which travelled at a terrific pace and which was touched over the bar, by Whitting. Had the winger kept the ball a bit lower Whiting would never have seen it. The whistle came as a welcome relief.

The Players.
I have nothing but praise for the Everton defence. I have never seen Caldwell play so well. He was very confident from the start and his dealing with shots never caused the least anxiety. One or two of his saves were really fine. MaConnachie was the best back on the field, and he was ably seconded by Stevenson, whilst the halves worked very hard during a trying time. Wareing was the outstanding figure, but Val Harris was not far behind and Grenyer despite his injuries –he was knocked out three times. –Stuck to his task in heroic fashion. Near the end he dashed in though limping, and twice by desperate efforts he cleared with big kick. The inside forwards left something to be desired, but the wingmen did exceptionally well. Davidson was very much in the picture. I have not seen him play a better game. He centred promptly, and in addition tested the keeper pretty often in the first half. Beare, too, was at his best, and his centres deserved a better fate. Browell was not seen to advantage but Jefferis combined with Beare exceedingly well. I can tell you that Brighton will make a good show on Wednesday. They have a fine half-back line and a good defence, Whitting saved some fine shots and Leeming is stiff a general. Booth and McGhie are very good. The forwards lacked finish, and Longstaff did not play up to expectations. There will be a good game on Wednesday, and I may say that tickets may be obtained at Messrs, Rushworth and Dreapers, Basnett-Street and Islington.

EVERTON PROBABLE CHANGES
February 4, 1913. The Evening Express, Liverpool
By the Critic
At Goodison Park Everton and Brighton meet once more in order to settle their differences and having witnessed the struggle at Brighton I can assure intending spectators that it will be a good hard game well worth seeing. As Wednesday is the half-day holiday in the city attendance is bound to reach very large dimensions, but Goodison Park is such a spacious enclosure that all who desire to see the match will be able to gain admission. The gates will be opened at 1.15 and the kick-off I timed for 2.45 in order to allow for extra time in necessary.

Makepeace and Gourlay Probable Starters
There is likely to be a very stern struggle for the honour of appearing in the third round, and though Everton ought to win, I quite expect those sturdy half-backs Booth, McGhie and Higham to play a very prominent part of the game. Still the turf at the Park ought to be in better condition than that at Hove and the players will be able to judge the ball much better than was the case on Saturday. Unfortunately Everton will not be at full strength. I anticipated that neither Bradshaw nor Grenyer would be able to play as the injuries sustained were rather painful, and are such as to require rest. The trainer though he would be able to get Grenyer fit, but it is thought advisable not to risk a breakdown and I am informed that Makepeace will reappear. Harry certainly looks very well and he says he is feeling quite ready for duty. His injured ankle has recovered its former strength and I should say that the noted left-half will do well against the sprightly Longstaff. It was obvious that Frank Bradshaw would he unfit, and I learn that Gourlay is the likely candidate for the inside-left berth. Gourlay is a worker, who ought to be suited by the cup-tie style of play. The forwards must needs finish much better than they did at Brighton if they intend to win, as Whiting is still a good goalkeeper, who is capable of saving shots from all quarters, but he seems to be more at home with the high ball. Joe Leeming is naturally not so fast as he once was, but he uses rare judgment in tackling and placing himself. Beare easily beat him for possession when it came to a run for the ball, and the winger ought to do well tomorrow. Longstaff and Simpson are the most dangerous wing pair, and they will require a deal of watching. Simpson as a good shot, and Longstaff is very speedily. He directors choose the team this evening. Brighton will make changes as the outside left. Middleton and the centre forward, Miller failed to do themselves justice on Saturday.
If Everton win tomorrow they will have to travel to either Bristol or Norwich in the next round. The Southern Leagues clubs do not play off heir tie until Thursday, but I hope Everton enthusiasts will not have lost interest in the tie by that time.

EVERTON PROBABLE CHANGES.
February 4, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool.
By the Critic.
The Replay.
At Goodison Park Everton and Brighton once more meet in order to settle their differences and having witnessed the struggle at Brighton. I can assure intending spectators that it will be a good hard game, well worth seeing. As Wednesday is the half-day holiday in the city the attendance is bound to reach very large dimensions, but Goodison Park's such a spacious enclosure that all who desire to see the match will be able to gain admission. The gates will be opened at 1.15, and the kick off kick off is timed for 2-45 in order to allow for extra time if necessary.

Makepeace and Gourlay Probable Starters.
There is likely to be a very stern struggle for the honour of appearing in the third round, and though Everton ought to win, I quite expect those sturdy half-backs Booth McGhie and Higham to play a very prominent part in the game. Still the turf at the Park ought to be in better condition than that at Hove, and the players will be able to judge the ball much better than was the case on Saturday. Unfortunately Everton will not be at full strength. I anticipated that neither Bradshaw nor Grenyer would be able to play as the injuries sustained were rather painful and are such as to requite rest. The trainers though he would be able to get Grenyer fit, nut its though advisable not to risk a breakdown, and I am informed that Makepeace will reappear. Harry certainly looks very well, and he says he is feeling quite ready for duty. His injured ankle has recovered its former strength, and I should say that the noted left-half will do well against the sprigthing Longstaff. It was obviously that Frank Bradshaw would be unfit, and I learn that Gourlay is the likely candidate for the inside-left berth. Gourlay is a worker, who ought to be suited by the Cup-tie style of play. The forwards must needs finish much better than they did at Brighton if they intend to win, as Whiting is still a good goalkeeper, who is capable of saving shots from all quarters, but he seems to be more at home with the high ball. Joe Leeming is naturally not so fast as he once was, but he uses rare judgement in tackling and placing himself. Beare easily beat him for possession, when it came to a run of the ball, and the winger ought to do well tomorrow. Longstaff and Simpson are the most dangerous wing pair, and they will require a deal of watching, Simpson is a good shot, and Longstaff is very speedy. The directors choose the team this evening. Brighton will make changes, as the outside left Middleton and the centre forward Miller failed to do themselves justice on Saturday.

EVERTON V. BRIGHTON
February 5 1913. Evening Express Liverpool.
A Dour Struggle.
Jefferis Scorers for the Blues.
For the replay Cup-tie at Goodison park, this afternoon there were changes in both teams: -The disablement of Bradshaw and Grenyer led to Makepeace after his long absence, re-appearing at left half back, while Gourlay took the place of Bradshaw at inside left. The Brighton directors were not at all satisfied with the play of Miller and Middleton on Saturday, and in their place Needham returned to the centre-forward position and Goodwin to the out-side left berth, making the team the same as defeated Portsmouth in the first round. The teams were: - Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson and Macconnachie (captain), backs, Harris, Wareing, and Makepeace halfbacks, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Gourlay, and Davidson, forwards. Brighton and Hove: - Whiting, goal, Leeming (captain), and Spencer, backs, Higham, McGhie, and Booth, half-backs, Goodwin, Webb, Needham, Simpson and Longstaff, forwards. Referee Mr. Garner (Barnsley).

25,000 Spectators.
The weather was fine ands the ground good condition when the game started before well over 25,000 spectators. The Southerners were the first away, the ball being swung out to Goodwin, and in endeavouring to meet the latter's centre Needham was pulled up for offside. A raid by the Everton left wing was smartly repulsed, and then came some exciting work, in which Browell made a valiant attempt to rush in from a centre by Gourlay. Beare next dropped the ball on the wrong side eof the post. Spencer then prevented Davidson from centreing at the expense of a corner. The place kick was well taken, Leeming getting the ball away with a timely header. Then Beare was given an opportunity of showing his paces, but he kicked too far forward. Receiving from the right Davidson found himself marked so he passed to Makepeace, the latter's shot being intercepted by McGhie as the expense of another corner. This ended in an exciting scrimmage in front of the Brighton goal, in which Davidson almost succeeded in rushing a goal.

Easy Chance Missed.
The Brighton forwards than had a brief spell of attacking, and Webb was given possession right in front of the home goal. He was too late, however, Makepeace dispossessing him in the nick of time. In the next few minutes' play the Brighton forwards provided some real thrills. In the first place Goodwin cleverly worked his way round MaConnachie and centred accurately, Caldwell having to throw himself across the goal to prevent Needham from scoring. The visitors came again. Stevenson charged a dangerous shot down, but this only brought temporary relief and for a few seconds the home goal was in imminent danger. The Everton forwards next attacked strongly, but were finding it no easy matter to overcome the Brighton defence.

A Determined Rush.
By Browell and Gourlay ended in Whiting having to spring into the air to save. From a header Browell did get the ball through the net a minute or two later, but the whistle had previously blown for offside. In one of his clearances Whiting had wrenched his left shoulder, and although he remained at his post of duty, the injury seemed to be giving him great pain. One could not help but admire the determined play of the Brighton halves, and backs. The worrying tactics of their halves certainly upset the calculations of the home forwards, in most of their attempts at combined play. The reintroduction of Needham as leader of the Brighton attacks was an effective change, the Brighton front line as a whole showing greater dash than on Saturday. Stevenson on one occasion found himself in a tight corner, and he had perforce to concede a corner Gourlay got in one grand shot, which

Whiting Saved Brilliantly.
The ball was smartly returned, one of the backs getting the ball away before Browell came rushing up Davidson next forged ahead and he sent a splendid pass down to Browell, but before the home centre could shoot McGhie had nipped in and saved at the expense of a corner. The Needham dashed away to the other end, and he got past Stevenson, only to sheer the ball over the bar. The game was being fought in great earnestness and the fact that so far no goals had been forthcoming was largely a tribute to the soundness of the respective defences. Caldwell had not been overburdened with work, but had had a number of hot shots to stop Everton goals had a

Very Narrow Escape
Five minutes before the interval, Caldwell having to throw himself full length to keep out a swift drive from Longstaff. Beare capped one fine run with a glorious shot, but Whiting refused to be beaten.

Half-time Everton 0 Brighton 0
In the early stages of the second half the Brighton forwards had quite as much of the attacking as the homesters, and on one occasion Needham placed just over the bar. A clever bout of passing amongst the home forwards led to Jefferis getting in a storming shot. Whiting, however, saved smartly. Both sides were now

Fighting Desperately Hard.
To score but the backs were unyielding. Neat work between Beare and Jefferis led to the ball being placed in front, but Browell was just too late to get the ball away with his head. Then followed some brisk work by the Brighton forwards. Needham made a valiant attempt to get through on his own, but failed, and a minute later Goodwin brought Caldwell to his knees with lighting shot. At the other end Leeming was just in time to prevent Browell shooting from close range. Another raid by the visitors ended in Longstaff dashing past MaConnachie. He centred accurately but Needham failed in his attempt to get the ball through. Both goalkeepers were now being kept busy and Whiting had two difficult shots to stop one from Wareing and another from Beare. The Everton players although working hard, were shaping anything but well.

Beare's Hard Luck.
Following one attack by the home rightwing player Gourlay was given possession only to shot wide. In the last few minutes play the Brighton goal had a remarkable escape. Whiting had saved from Davidson, and only partially cleared when Beare rushed up only to fail to rush the ball through. Score after ninety minutes :- Everton 0 Brighton 0.
Extra time was played and Jefferis scored for Everton after five minutes from a pass by Gourlay. Extra time being played.

EVERTON 1 BRIGHTON HOVE ALBION 0
February 6, 1913. The Liverpool Daily Post and Mercury.
Fa Cup Round Two Replay.
EVERTON'S HARD WIN
BRIGHTON BEATEN IN EXTRA TIME.
Why League supporters should underrate Southern talent is rather difficult to explain, unless the great difference in style influence First League crowds. Brighton have taught Everton's supporters that gameness and stamia may hold skill and intelligence at bay, for Everton have only scored once in two strenuous games extending over 210 minutes. Prejudice will have its way,. Too, for on top of Saturday's grim display some of the critcics opined Everton would have an easy task in the replay yesterday at Goodison Park. The very reverse happened, for the Brighton contingent gave Everton a gruelling game, and showed qualities, which appealed to the sympathic appreciation of the home crowd. The visitors knew their game, and set to work in the most businesslike way to run the Blues off their feet. There was no artistic dribbling and pretty finesse, simply because the irrepressible Southern made the pace a cracker and pusted Everton without mercy. Although hard and strenuous, the game as to quality was distinctly commonplace, and both sides distinguished themselves by sadly mixing up the few chances they had of scoring. Everton's attack was woefully weak and inept, for Browell was even loss a force than on Saturday, and was effectually smothered by McGhie. Gourlay was not a success as Davidson's partner, while the left winger was erractic, though his best work was really clever. Even Beare did not come off against such a dour pair as Leeming and Higham, who harassed Jefferis and his speedy partner rushlessly. Browell's want of experience in Cup warfare was a serious handicap. The glory of Brighton and Hove is their custodian and their half-back line. Whiting was defeated, but he was a prime favourite with the home crowd right to the finish, and well merited their generous appreciation. In attack the visitors proved crude, and in the forward department their true weakness lies. Caldwell had little to do, but several of his clearances were clumsy and laboured. Brighton's halves were a great at breaking up combination and feeding their forwards, but their own terrific pace reacted, and bothered the goals area menceuvres sadly. There were times when Brighton's heroic rushes quite upset the home defence, and just a little cool combination might have given the doughty visitors the lead. But their own impetuosity proved fatal, while their marksmanship was wild and erractic and otttimes of ridiculous range. Longstaff was the star artiste in a mediocre line, but for the most part he flattered but to deceiver. Both Wareing and McGhie were splendid in tackling and tactics. Neither goal had been pierced at the termination of the second half, and so the game was proceeded with for an extra half hour. Everton, however, had a golden opportunity of winning in the last minute, when an involved and subtle movement between Davidson, Browell, and Gourlay completely outwitted the Hove defenders, and left Whiting at Beare's mercy, but, to the crowd's dismay the forward stumbled over the ball instead of shooing. Extra time brought Everton luck, and they made a bold effort at once to redeem their fortunes. During a well sustained attack Browell got possession at the angle of the penalty area, and Jefferis receiving turned a most difficult chance to account with a remarkable screw shot, which just proved too much for the redoubtable Whiting. Thus did Everton receive their due reward after 200 minutes of stenuous strife, and thereby give Brighton the “happy dispatch” out of the Cup competition, vanquished by 1 goal to nil. The teams were: - Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson and Macconnachie (Captain), backs, Harris, Wareing, and Makepeace half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Gourlay, and Davidson, forwards. Brighton and Hove: - Whiting, goal, Leeming, and Spencer, backs, Higham, McGhie, and Booth, half-backs, Goodwin, Webb, Needham, Simpson and Longstaff, forwards. Referee Mr. Garner (Barnsley).

The gate receipts amounted approximately to £906, the attendance being placed at 35,000.

A SHOCK FOR EVERTON
February 6 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool.
Brighton gave Everton a rare shock as may be gathered from the fact that two hours play was necessary before the Seasiders were compelled to admit defeat. Although beaten the Southerners were by no means disgraced, and they have the satisfaction of knowing that they ran the noted Goodison brigade to a goal. Had they taken full advantage of their openings, however, they would not have lost, and indeed, on the general run of the play they were rather unfortunate in being “knocked out.” A sturdy resourceful side, Brighton played typical cup-tie football, and earned his high praise from the local enthusiasts who cheered them in most impartial manner. One likes to see visiting teams encouraged, and Liverpool enthusiasts are to be congratulated on their sporting spirit. It is not the same at many grounds I have visited.

A Strenuous Game.
It was a strenuous game from the beginning and Brighton were apparently bent on preventing Everton, if possible, from following their usual style of play. To a great extent they succeeded, and Everton gave their friends many frights during the course of the game. The “Blues” were strangely ineffective, there being a hesitancy about their methods which did not look well for the success of the side. The backs were frequently at sea, and it was a good thing that the front line did not reach the high standard of the half-backs. The home team were by no means at their best, and even Wareing who is usually so strong in his kicking and placing, was at times all at sea, and the hesitating nature of the returns was quite foreign to what we are accustomed to expect from Everton. Harry Makepeace started extremely well, and there were indications that he had attained his most sparkling form, but at the game advanced he fell away. Probably MaConnachie and Makepeace, by reason of their not playing together recently, did not have the same understanding. At any fate the pair frequently made blunders. On further acquaintance the noted pair ought to resume their former brilliance. As indicated Wareing was not the half-back we know him to be, and I though Harris was the best of the trio. Caldwell did all that was asked of him. McConnachie and Stevenson gave a mixed display. On occasions the pair were good, but at times they were lacking in their kicking and placing. It was not a good day for the Everton backs.

Moderate Forward Play.
I thought the Everton forwards would have done better had more attention been paid to the right wing. Beare had very little to do, and he missed a great chance when he fell near the finish. Jefferis was the best of a moderate line, and it was fitting that to him the credit of scoring the goal should have gone. Browell was not prominent. He was too well looked after to be of service, and Gourlay and Davidson after putting in some fine touches at the outset, later fell away to nothing. I understand that Gourlay is suffering from an injured ankle. When Everton tried to play the short passing game their opponents would not let them, and trying the swinging game, the “Blues” could not get into their stride. However, the main point is they won, and we now await the decision of the Bristol-Norwich tie.

Busting Half-Backs.
The Brighton half-backs were decidedly the best part of the team. Booth, who is on reserve for the first of the internationals, played a really dashing game, and frequently earned applause. Booth is a sturdy player, who possesses skill and judgement, and among the crowd one could hear remarks to the effect that Everton ought to secure him. What price though? Higham and McGhie were also to the fore in breaking up combination, whilst Leeming, who assisted Bury in a Cup tie on the same ground sixteen years ago, displayed much judgement. Whiting saved at least two very fine shots, one from Gourlay and another from Jefferis, and altogether he was most able between the sticks his big kicking being greatly admired. Brighton have the satisfaction of sharing in a sum amounting to nearly £1,000 so that with the £775 taken at Brighton the clubs have done very well out of the tie.

The “Derby” Match.
Several of the Everton players complained of injury after the match, and it is unlikely that the “Blues” team to meet Liverpool will be chosen until noon on Saturday. Bradshaw may not able to play for some weeks, and there is talk of a New Left wing. Perhaps Stevens will be introduced. Whatever the side there will be a great crowd to see the local “Derby” which under all circumstances is always interesting, but the present junction, with the teams in the third round of the Cup, the game is doubly interesting.

BRIGHTON & HOVE ALBION v. EVERTON.
Sussex Agricultural Express - Friday 07 February 1913
The game between the Albion and Everton attracted quite 14,000 people to the Goldstone Ground, Hove, on Saturday. Rain fell almost incessantly during the first half, and the ground was in a sodden condition. Three members of the visiting team, Caldwell, Jefferies, and Bradshaw, have appeared in Southern League matches on the Goldstone Ground previously, the players having done service for Reading, Southampton, and Northampton respectively. Everton won the toss, but Brighton were the first to attack. Bradshaw had to leave the field early in this half, whilst Brighton were very dashing. Everton did most of the pressing. Their combination was more powerful and the defence was very safe. Maconnachie, the left back, played -very sound game, but the forwards did not send in any difficult shots. A clear case of handling by Spencer in the penalty area was ignored by the referee. Bradshaw was still absent when the second half commenced, and Brighton had more of the play, but the visitors' defence continued to be very difficult to pass, whilst the mid-field play on each side was very good. Considering the difficulties rendered by the state of the ground, it was surprising that there was few good shots at goal. The game was full interest to the last minute, but the defences on each side were superior to the attacks. Middleton, at outside left, from the Albion Reserves team, had a stiff ordeal, and the lett wing was the weaker part in the Albion team. Teams Brighton & Hove Albion.—Whiting; Spencer,! Leeming ; Booth, McGhie, Higham ; Longstaff, Simp-1 son, Miller, Webb, Middleton. Everton. Caldwell; Stevenson, Maconnachie ; Harris, Wareing, Grenyer; Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, Davidson.

HOUSTON SIGNS FOR EVERTON
Dundee Courier - Friday 07 February 1913
The question as to which club Houston, the Irish International outside right, who has been playing with I.infield, would assist was settled yesterday when he signed on for Everton a professional. Everton had signed him an amateur, but he could not play for them until twelve months had elapsed after his leaving the army. This period has now expired, and may turn out for Everton on Saturday.

EVERTON PLAYERS JOINS WARRINGTON RUGBY.
February 7, 1913. The Liverpool Courier.
The Warrington Football Club Committee have secured the signature, as an amateur of J. Cannon Bardsley, the ex-Everton player. Prior to joining Everton, he assisted Rossendale and Northen Nomads in his new sphere. Bardsley will have another ex-Everton comrade in C.H. Berry, who was for several seasons the recognised goalkeeper for the combination team, and has returned to the Northern Union Club, which he formly assisted.

C. Berry Everton record: - 1908-09 2 League apps,
1911-12 1 League apps, total 3 League matches, conceded 6 League goals.
J.C. Bardsley Everton record: - 1909-10 1 league app.

THE DERBY
(Blues won 2-1 last season)
February 8, 1913. Evening Express Liverpool.
Everton Entertain Liverpool.
A Great Battle.
Blues Worsted on Their Own Pitch.
Parkinson the Hero
Scores the Only Two Goals of the Match.
Reds' Fine Win.
By Cosmo
Something like 45,000 spectators witnessed the match at Goodison Park this afternoon between the two Liverpool teams. Apart from the almost ideal conditions prevailing –springlike weather with occasional outbursts of glorious sunshine –the game was made all the more attractive by reason of the fact that Everton tried their new Irish player, Houston as leader of the attack. Browell was moved to inside left in place of Bradshaw, who was injured a week ago. The only change from Wednesday's Cup tie team was the appearance of Holbem at right full-back in place of Stevenson at right fullback, Fleetwood doing duty in place of Wareing. Liverpool, on the other hand, were at full strength.

The Teams. Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Holbem, and Macconnachie (captain) backs, Harris, Fleetwood, and Makepeace, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Houston, Browell, and Davidson, forwards. Liverpool: - Campbell, goal, Longsworth, and Crawford, backs, Lowe, Peake and Ferguson, half-backs, Goddard (captain), Melcalfe, Parkinson, Miller, and Lacey, forwards. Referee. Mr. H. A. Taylor.

Enthusiasm was at usual at a high pitch, and the colours of the respective clubs were freely worm by their ardent followers. Half-an-hour before the time for commencement all the open spaces were filled and mounted police were on the ground preventing in the nature of crushing at the various entrances.

Liverpool Lively.
The game opened with some dashing play by the Liverpool men. Parkinson after receiving from Peake, placed to Metclafe, who in turn sent out to Goddard, the latter rushing in and striking the far side post with a grand shot. It was a narrow escape for the Blues and the Reds were loudly cheered. Campbell had to save a long shot from Harris, and then Parkinson galloped away to the other end. He passed back to Miller, but the latter's shot was intercepted by Holbem. The ball was quickly taken to the Liverpool quarters, and receiving from Browell. Davidson, got in a dangerous short-range shot which Campbell kept out smartly. Everton were forcing matters right in front of the Liverpool goal, when Harris drove in strongly, his shot being charged down by one of the backs.

A Smart Pace.
Despite the heavy going ground, a smart pace had been set up right from the start, and all the players were as keen as mustard. A rush to the Everton end ended in Caldwell having to spring into the air to clear a dangerous centre from Goddard. Goddard was again prominent, and from a another of his fine centres Melcalf should have scored, but he shot was sadly lacking in force. Liverpool came again in determined fashion. Fleetwood doing effective work with his head when in a tight corner. Parkinson next got clean past Holbem, but he made a poor attempt to get the better of MaConnachie, who eventually got the ball away with his head. Then Houston came into the picture. He cleverly tricked Crawford and dashed ahead, finally placing to Beare. The latter's centre, however, brought nothing tangible. A free kick was given against Liverpool in a dangerous position, only for Harris to place aimlessly behind. The vast crowd was being provided with

Exhilarating Football
And they were not slow to show appreciation on one occasion Houton came in for a storm of cheering. He cleverly worked his way round Crawford only to come grit against the sturdy Ferguson.

Crowd Displeased.
The referee was not pleasing the crowd with his versions of the offside rule, and he had to put up with considerable booing but did not seen to mind. Fleetwood dispossessed Miller when the player had visions of finding the net. In the next Liverpool attack Ferguson tried a long shot the ball grazing the crossbar. A clever bout of passing was next seen between the Everton inside forward only for Longsworth to tip in and clear his lines. A slight stoppage followed through Everton Ferguson being disabled. Goddard was making tracks for the Everton goal when MaConnachie stopped his career, when a second or two later Caldwell had to field a swift shot from Melcalf . Then came another stoppage through Fleetwood receiving the full force of the ball in the body. Both sets of halves were displaying worrying tactics, and so far neither of the keepers had been overburdened with work. Crawford fouled Beare rather harshly, and he was loudly booed.

Reds Draw Boood.
The game had been in progress twenty-five minutes when Parkinson drew first blood for the Reds. A capital pass from Goddard gave Parky his opportunity. He dashed clean between the backs and scored with a low shot, which completely beat Caldwell. It was a dashing bit of play, and the Reds were loudly cheered. Houston next netted the ball with a header, but unfortunately the point did not count, the referee's whistle having previously blown for offside. The Everton forwards were now playing with great dash, and from a well-placed corner kick by Davidson. Campbell had to rush out and clear. Crawford was allowing the vigour of the game to upset his temper, and once or twice he was guilty of over robust tactics. Campbell next had to save a hot shot from Beare, and immediately following Goddard got in a clever sprint, Melcalf placing just wide.

A Duel.
Beare and Crawford were next engaged in an interesting duel, the Everton forward coming out on top and getting in a capital centre. The Reds returned to the attack, and Parkinson was given possession in a good position, but his shot was distinctly feeble. Then Liverpool gained a corner kick and from a pass by Peake, Goddard placed over the bar with a header. At times there was a fair amount of feeling amongst the players, one or two unpleasant incidents escaped the notice of the referee. The first half had produced some capital football, and there had been little to chosen between the teams on the general run of the play. Houston the new Everton player, had done several smart things, but he had not been given much latitude, Peake keening a watchful eye on him. Just before half-time he got in a likely header, which Campbell kept out smartly.

Half-time Everton 0 Liverpool 1.
Second Half.
Liverpool opened the second half with a sprinted raid on the Blues' goal and after Holbem had been beaten Harris was only just in time to prevent Miller going through. The Everton forwards soon found their proper stride. Beare dashed away and his accurate centre was badly missed by Jefferis. In the next Everton attack Houston made a valiant attempt to get through, but his final shot was diverted wide of the goal. Parkinson was tripped by Fleetwood, but the incident escaped the notice of the referee. Another onslaught by Everton saw Jefferis swing over to Davidson, who headed over the bar before being brought down by Longsworth. Houston had not been given many openings, but he was given one glorious opportunity, which he failed to make use of. Harris placed the ball right in front of him, and Houston, with only

The Keeper to Beat.
Shot wide of the target. Campbell made a splendid save from Beare, while a few seconds later Browell was loudly cheered for a thirty yards' pot shot, which, hit the crossbar. Houston rushed up, but he had the misfortune to handle the ball before placing into the net.

Stoppages.
Neither side relaxed efforts, and Miller in one lively rush was injured, and the game had to be stopped for a few moments. There was another stoppage soon afterwards through Miller and Harris banging their heads together much to each other's discomfort. Miller at this stage took the outside left berth, and Lacey went to the inside position. Goddard next beat Makepeace right in the goal area, but instead of banging the ball into the net he foolishly passed back Caldwell rushing out and saving.

Liverpool's Second Goal.
There was great excitement over Liverpool's second goal, which came twenty minutes from the end. Parkinson got possession on the half-way line, and he was almost on a level with the Everton backs. He dashed clear in front of him and scored with a strong shot. It was a great effort, and the crowd cheered and waved their hats. This further success put new life into the Liverpool players, and in the next few minutes the Everton goal had several narrow escapes. Caldwell kept out likely shots from Metcalf and Lacey, and Parkinson, after individual efforts succeeded in getting the better of MaConnachie, only to finally place wide. Another dangerous attack was led by Parkinson, who placed to Metcalf who with only the keeper to beat shot wide. Liverpool continued to force matters, and Metcalf made a valiant attempt to rush, the ball through, but failed. One breakaway by the Evrton forwards saw Houston dashing for goal, only to be smartly pulled up by Crawford. Liverpool continued to harrass the Everton defence.

Final result Everton 0 Liverpool 2. Goal-scorers. Liverpool Parkinson (2)
Caustic Comments.
By Rover.
The weather suggests the above headlines. Everything and everybody is wreather in smiles and Mr. Cuff, with his notorious business acument, has again made excellent arrangements for housing the big crowd. And the playing pitch –all spie and span –reflects every credit upon those who were responsible for its recovery after the churning experience of Wednesday last. Topics of the moments will the Anfielders reproduce the brilliant form they exhibited at Woolwich? And will the Blues have recovered sufficiently after their mid-week grueling? Bonhomie and cheery optimistism appears to be the stock in trade of the patient partisans of the respective clubs. The Everton directors have been racking their cerebral pulp all week. They finally decided on their side last night, and as the “Express had it” Houston was to lead the van. There they come, and what a reception! Does one good to hear such applause. And what tense excitement when Liverpool got down and Goddard flashed the ball against the upright. Nearest thing in the world. The Reds' early form was promising enough, but breaking away. Davidson's shot struck Campbell, and thus fortune was levelled up. Footwork was clever and effective on both sides of the best to be had. The “specs” were consequently having a good time.” Who said Goddard was a back number? His work just was brilliant Mac did not relish Park's hausting. Near thing. Howls. But the “ref” saw his mistake and made the only amends he could. But it was rough on Parky. Verdict after fifteen minutes. A very good game and not much between them. Houston has been fitting in all right, but has not displayed anything of a starting nature up to now. The Irish International, however, looked like running through a moment later, after he defeated Longsworth, but he had to reckon with Ferguson, who displayed splendid judgement in falling back. Twenty minutes gone, and there was every indication of the early excellence of the play being sustained by both sides. Thrills again. Lacey skimmed the bar from a corner kick.

Mac In Difficulties.
“Mac” in difficulties again, but –any port in a storm. However, Metcalf came near “doing it” from the throw in. Browell, who had cottoned on to this new position with much success, was often in the picture. Some of his passes were par excellence, and interlarded with the ordinary were clever overhead touches that Davidson fully relished. A short conversation by the “ref” and Crawford to the accompaniment of yelis. Come, Crawford, quite unnecessary. Half an hour and the exact dos synchronized with a goal to Liverpool. Goddard opened the movement and put to Parky, who from almost half-way went past the backs and beat Caldwell with a low shot. Talk about lungs. Why, those of the Anfielders' supporters must surely have been leather lined. And the other fellows, too, were in evidence a couple of minutes later, but unluckily for them Houston's header past Campbell was annulled to offside. Beare away again, and this time Crawford showed that he can play the legitimate game. Pity he had hitherto lost himself. Liverpool forwards were still the more business like side. Both Lacey and Goddard were near the mark. Well played, Ferguson! Clever indeed. “Parky” prominent just now –but in the offside business. Half-time with Liverpool one up, and none of the spectators could honestly begrudge them their success. Everton's half-back play had not been up to the mark. But the Blues were the more fancy, and Houston's distribution quite a feature. The ex-Linfield player, however, missed a chance of a lifetime by lifting wide of the mark. Beare had a glorious opening and failed similarly while Houston handled the ball after Browell had shot against the crossbar, and his netting of the ball was promptly disallowed. People who desired and better football than was being served must be gluttons. The one bright particular star among many was Arthur Goddard. Oh, what a chance. No one up to take Goddard's pass, and only a yard or two from goal. Another outburst, and a second goal for Liverpool. And it was of a brilliant order too, Parky was again the hero, after sprinting over half the field. Only one team in it just now, but it was over-eagerness that prevented Lacey from putting on a third. Parky again –great excitement –but made a mistake this time in not parting to Goddard, and the chance was lost.

EVERTON RES V. CREWE ALEX
February 8, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool.
Played at Crewe. Everton turned out with a strong team, which included A. Browell. Immediately from the start Simms forced an unproductive corner for Everton. Milward showed up sell for Crewe, and the services of Hodge were quickly requisitioned, be affecting a good clearance the visitors' line were cleared. Hawkins took up the play for Crewe and another rally by the home forwards resulted in Hodge once more being hard pressed Simpson cleared and with some good passing on the part of Smith, the ball was sent direct to the Crewe goal, where Box cleared. A long shot by Browell just failed to reach the mark after Box had fallen full length to clear. Immediately afterwards Milward missed a great opportunity to score with the Everton goal at his mercy. Play was still interesting. Hodge saved cleverly from Newman and the Everton goal afterwards was severely threatened, but the sturdy of Simpson and Hodge resulted in keeping the home forwards at bay, a long shot by Kay went sailing over the bar. Eveningly the ball was placed to Browell, was in turn passed to Uren who caused Box to kick away. Another smart bit of work y Hawking was responsible for play being transferred so the other end, where Hodge was equally all emergencies. Just before the interval the Everton players claimed for a penalty, but the appeal was not allowed. Half-tome no score.

EVERTON 0 LIVERPOOL 2
February 10, 1013. The Liverpool Mercury.
LIVERPOOL'S GREAT VICTORY.
HOUSTON'S DEBUT.
It is not indulging in exaggeration to suggest that Liverpool have found their feet to such an extent that at present they are entitled to be classed as the equal of any football organisation in the county. A week ago at Woolwich they smote the gunners hip and thign, and last Saturday a crowd of 45,000 witnessed the team's undoubtedly superiority over the neighbours at Goodison Park. That the Anfielders would secure full points was generally anticipated, seeing that they were at full strength as opposed to enforced changes in their opponents ranks. The defection of such stalwarts as Bradshaw, Wareing, Grenyer, and Stevenson would of course discount to some extent the prospects of the home club's success. Yet those who represented the club were all tried experts, and much was expected from them. Then there was the introduction of the ex-Linfield and Irish International Houston but the changes did not exercise a wholesome effect and no partisan could possibly on Saturday have degrudged Liverpool their success, it is remarkable, but none the less true, that in the history of League encounters between the two great local organisations Liverpool fare better at Goodison than at their own headquarters. In seven visits they have only twice met with defeat, while on the contrary, Everton have generally found their old home a happy hunting ground for points.

CONTRAST IN METHODS.
At all points of the game were the Anfielders the superior side, and nowhere more so than in the complete understanding that existed between the forwards and half-backs lines. There was a wholesome blending of methods that suggested a well-thought –out plan of campaign, and the quality of the footwork in these departments was one of the outstanding features of the game. Of hesitancy there was none, and the trustful movements of the quintet had an undercurrent of superiority that was eventually bound to assert itself. Though somewhat belated, it came in no uncertain fashion during the second portion of the game, when the daft footwork of the forwards completely bewilded the Everton defenders, and the wonder was that the score was not materially increased. Opposed to this, Everton's attack was ragged and rarely convincing, and they failed to fully extend their opponents. Those pretty and effective triangular movements between the halves and forwards, often frequent feature in Everton's programme, were entirely lacked, and the efforts of the van were thus cramped and reduced to a very ordinary level.

THE RESDPECTIVE DEFENCE.
As in the Cup-tie, the Liverpool half-back play left little room for adverse criticism, and under the circumstances those in front had every opportunity of displaying their ability. Not so on the Everton side, for there was a very poor appreciation shown of the requirements of the forwards, and not for many weeks has the half-back line been so feebly represented. This is a new experience for Everton, but the lapse is but temporary and we shall probably see much better work in coming games, when the line is at full strength. In defensive play, too Liverpool claimed a big pull, and it would not have surprised even the most casual, observer had the record against the home side been doubled.

INCIDENTS OF PLAY.
The two goals, one in each half, twenty-five minutes after the start and the resumption, were scored by Parkinson, who in his time has played many a prominent part in these inter-club games. His success, however, in this engagement has probably never been surpassed by reason of the cleverness he displayed in order to accomplish his object. On each occasion he had to sprint almost half the field, and a most brilliant individual effort that brought about the second goal could scarcely be imagined. While Fleetwood's attentions were directed to another quarter the ball was deftly placed to the Liverpool centre, who rounding Holbem and brushing past Macconnachie, left Caldwell helpless. The cleverness of the movements was vociferously applauded, and some time elsaped ere the enthusiasm died down. The goal in the first half was also well engineered, and in this case it was Goddard who set Parkinson on his successful mission. The Everton forwards were not idle; indeed, one brilliant shot from Browell rebounded from the crossbar, while many a dashing run by Houston kept the Liverpool backs well employed. The new recruits once got the ball into the net, but he was adjudged offside still the forwards as a whole failed to retain possession and rarely looked like overhauling their opponents.

THE VICTORS.
Coming to the players and dealing first with the victors every player on the side is to be complimented upon the whole heartedness of their efforts, and the grit and persistency that they showed in carrying out a studied plan of campaign. Mention has been side of Parkinson. Goddard has never rendered his club better service, and in conjunction with Metcalf indulged in much dexterous and adroit footwork, so much so as to quite unhinge the opposing defence, while Lacey and Miller completed a line that created genuine admiration. The success of the forwards was of course, greatly due to the untiring zeal, and all-round efficiency of the half-backs. Ferguson got through a tremendence amount of good work. Peake and Lowe were rare short of pressure. Longsworth and Crawford set up a great defence.

THE VANQUISHED.
On the Everton side great interest was naturally centred upon Houston. He was under a disadvantage seeing that he was not in the position, which has made him famous but there could be no mistaking the fact that he is an exceptionally capable footballer, and will prove an invaluable member to his new club. He makes up for lack of physique by real cleverness in taking a ball without losing his speed, and by a ready perception of the nearest route to goal. One could imagine his speedy flashes along the wing and centre to the liking of a resourceful pivot, and when matters become normal again at Goodison there may be anticipated a big advance in the direction of more virile forward play. Browell at inside left, did uncommonly well, but none of the other forwards did anything out of the ordinary. This was probably due to weak support from the halves, of whom only Harris rendered useful assistance. Fleetwood was overwhelmed, and Makepeace is not yet able to stand the strain of a stern engagement. The lapses of the rearguard proved fatal. They did not maintain that stubborn attitude that is necessary to check an energetic set of forwards, and in this respect Holbem especially had a poor inception of the duties of a full back. Under the circumstances Macconnachie did fairly well, and Caldwell had little chance of keeping down the score. Teams: - Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Holbem, and Macconnachie (captain) backs, Harris, Fleetwood, and Makepeace, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Houston, Browell, and Davidson, forwards. Liverpool: - Campbell, goal, Longsworth, and Crawford, backs, Lowe, Peake and Ferguson, half-backs, Goddard (captain), Melcalfe, Parkinson, Miller, and Lacey, forwards. Referee Mr. H. A. Talor.

CREWE ALEXANDRA RESERVES 1 EVERTON RESERVES 0
February 10, 1913. The Liverpool Courier.
CENTRAL LEAGUE
Everton Reserves suffered a further reverse at Crewe, where the Alexandra prevailed by the only goal of the match, which was scored by Hawkins from a corner soon after the resumption. The teams were fairly evenly balanced.

REDS VICTORY
February 10, 1013. Evening Express Liverpool.
• First column is guest work, start from second column.
At the present rate of progress the Anfield club ought to gain a good place in the league chart. All round the team is sound, and on Saturday they were a their best smart footwork combined with a real understanding between the halves and forwards, forming a very “live” machine, which worked with great smoothness. Campbell did what little he had to do in his usual smart style, whilst the backs compared more than favourably with those of Everton. Longworth and Crawford were far more reliable than the Everton pair, and I was sorry to see the latter lose himself early on, but he settled down to play a fair game afterwards.

Strong Half-Backs.
The main strength of the team was the half back line. They dominated the position, and Everton never really got going against the substantial stop-block. Lowe played his best game of the season, and with Ferguson and Peake playing up to their usual high standard it may be imagined what a hard task faced the Blues. The trio were in touch with the forwards throughout, and to this the winners largely owed their success. The front line was very much alive the crisp subtle passes and spirited dashes being good to watch, and I am sure no one desires to see the better goals than those obtained by Parkinson.

Parky's Dash.
The Liverpool centre has frequently turned the tide in these games, and I fancy he takes particular pleasure in doing well on these occasions. He played one of his best games on Saturday, his passing and general distribution of the play being really smart, whilst his fine individual efforts crowned a good day's work. “Parky” demonstrated that he is by no means done with yet, and his speed is still a factor to be reckoned with Stevenson was not there to compete with him, and he beat Holbem and MaConnachie with case, and the latter were so “tired up” near the end that Liverpool ought to have won by at least double the score. The finishing perhaps due to over anxiety, was lacking, and Everton were let down lightly. Parkinson had a great day. Metcalf was a crafty as ever, his well-timed passed being most noticeable, whilst Goddard was in a sprightly mood, and the right wing was very aggressive, Miller was hurt, and this had one effect of his play, but Lacey did well. The Anfielders have every reason to be satisfied with their position.

Browell and Houston.
Now, what of Everton? In the first place it must be remembered that it was an experimental forward line, and that the defence was weakened. Caldwell could not be blamed. MaConnachie did all that he possibly could, but Holbem, after opening well, fell of considerably, and he was never able to complete with Parkinson for speed. Holbem adopted offside tactics with considerable success in the first half, but on the whole Stevenson was greatly missed. Fleetwood was deficient in placing whilst Makepeace has not yet settled down to his old style of play. Harris was the best half-back. Of the forwards I thought Browell played a really good game in his new position of inside left. His passing to Davidson was very neat indeed, and his shot, which struck the crossbar, deserved a better fate. Browell could often be trusted with the inside left berth was safety. Houston made a good impression, even though he was operating in the unaccustomed position of centre forwards. He showed one or two neat movements despite the fact that he was well watched by Peake, and I fancy his abilities will be brought to the front when he appears on the extreme right. When he headed the ball into the net in the first half Houston fairly flung himself at the ball and diverted it into the net in fine style. It was a really splendid effort, which deserved a better reward than an offside decision. There was no question about him handling the ball when he placed into the net a second time. Houston is a footballer, and if I mistake not he will make his mark in English League football. Jefferis played well, but the winger Beare was not so prominent usual. Ferguson keeping a watchful eye on, both him and Jefferis. When the conditions reach the normal again Everton should advance with the addition of the valuable services of a play like Houston.

BRISTOL ROVERS' VICTORY
February 11, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool. So Everton are to go to Bristol. I am sure the officials connected with the Goodison club will be glad to know they have not to visit Norwich, as it was felt that the small ground there –it is just over the minimum measurement –would greatly hamper the movements of the “Blues.” The enclosure at Bristol, I understand, is full size. The Rovers are a good side, and occupy a similar position in the Southern League to that occupied by Everton in the First League, so that it ought to be a good game. It is quite evident that the Rovers are Cup fighters to be respected, and Everton must play at the top of their form if they are to win. Palmer, the outside left, appears to have been the outstanding figure in the game yesterday. He was certainly the cleverest forward on the field. He initiated the movement, which led up the all-important goal scored by the amateur Shervey. Palmer has the slow, easy going style of the player who has complete confidence in his own ability. He invited the Norwich defenders to rush at him, and these defenders were never so sure of being beaten as when they rushed. Palmer was the most clever forward on the field, and it was he who made the attack of the Rovers appear so much better than that of Norwich, whose centre-forward was much too slow to be anything like exceptional ability. In fact, the slowness of the Norwich players was the chief handicap of the side, for it seldom that one of the loser's managed to beat a Bristol man in a race for the ball. Wolstenholme, the Old Everton player, was the best man on the Norwich side.

EVERTON CHANGES FOR BOLTON MATCH.
February 13, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool
By the Critic.
Some difficulties presented themselves, when the Everton directors sat to select the team to represent the Blues at Bolton on Saturday next in view of the fact that Harris and Houston were not available, and several alterations from the side, which lost to Liverpool, were rendered necessary. It is good to know that Wareing and Grenyer have recovered from their injuries, and will be able to take the field in their accustomed positions. The team chosen is as follows: - Caldwell; Stevenson, and MaConnachie; Fleetwood, Wareing, and Grenyer; Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Gault, and Uren.

Fleetwood as Wing Half.
It will be seen that a new departure has been made in playing Fleetwood at right half-back. The ex-Rochdale youth has usually figured at centre half or in the forward line, but evidently the directors prefer to leave the centre-half berth to Wareing. Fleetwood will have plenty to do to fill the shoes of Val Harris, and as he will be opposed by that fine winger Vizard he will be thoroughly tested. Grenyer has recovered from the injury sustained at Brighton, and his inclusion will undoubtedly strengthened the line.

Gault and Uren on the Left.
It will also be noticed that a new left wing compared with that which has been doing duty of late, has been introduced. Uren has been absent from the League team for some time, and his introduction, with Gault as a partner may improve the line. Gault is a good little player, who deserved to be encouraged. He has done well with the League team when fit, and he may show to advantage against the Trotters on Saturday. The Bolton team will, of Course, lack the services of Smith, the clever inside right, who will be assisting England in Ireland. Since they were beaten by Tottenham on the 1 st of January; the “Blues” have won four matches and drawn one, and it is to be hoped the defeat by Liverpool last Saturday is not to be the beginning of another series of defeats. The Trotters are a good side, and they beat Everton at Goodison Park in October, so that the “Blues” have a debt to pay, and I fancy they will make a bold bid on this occasion. The kick-off is timed for three o'clock, and the team leave Exchange Station at 1.10. The Reserve team to do duty at Goodison Park on Saturday against the Wanderers Reserve is; Hodge; Page and Simpson; Parker, Browell, and Gourlay; Smith, Brannick, Simms, Johnson, and Wright.
• Stevens, the outside left, who has been on trial at Everton, has suffered bereavement in the death of his wife.
The Bristol Cup tie.
The Bristol Rovers Club have decided to charge one shilling admission to the Cup-tie with Everton. Admission to the enclosures will be sixpence extra. It is intended to issue 10,000 tickets at one shilling for admission to the ground, and they will be obtainable at several places in the city shortly to be published. The privilege these tickets will carry will be that of entering the ground at half-past one on the day at the match, whereas non-ticket holders who enter by the turnstiles will have to wait another quarter of an hour. We have already received protests (says a Bristol paper) against the price of admission being raised for the match, but grumble will do well to remember what other clubs do in like circumstances, whilst it should also be borne in mind that when the Rovers are drawn away their supporters who wish to see them play have to pay several extrashings for that privilege for railway tickets, and food –and they appear to do so cheerfully. Moreover, when the club was doing badly last September and early October the grumblers stayed away from Eastville because they felt they were not getting value for their money. Now that they have the privilege of seeing a First League club at Eastville and a club well up the League ladder, too, they should not object to paying a fair price for that privilege. For the Everton Cup-tie at Bristol Messrs Bullock and Co in conjunction with the Great Western Railway are making their usual comprehensive arrangements. On Saturday morning at 7-45 a non-stop corridor dining car train will be run due at Bristol 12-20 p.m. The return arrangements are: - Leave Bristol 6-30. Passengers will be in Liverpool about 11 o'clock in time for the electric car.

BLUES AT BOLTON.
February 14, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool
Everton, who have suffered a great, deal in the matter of injuries, journey to Burnden Park to meet the Trotters of Bolton. The Blues will lack the services of Houston, Bradshaw, Harris, and Davidson; such, notable absentees must certainly jeopardize their chance, but I see no earthly reason why we cannot hope to at least share the spoils, for the team at the disposal of the Everton directors ought to give a good account of themselves. The full team will be: - Caldwell; Stevenson, MaConnachie; Fleetwood, Wareing and Grenyer; Beare, Jefferos, Browell, Gault and Uren.
The Wanderers will be without their clever inside left, Smith, but otherwise they are not badly, off, as the latter are the goods on their own ground, it will be interesting to know the result, for which, buy the “Express.”
Sports Pie.
• The Liverpool Schools boys' team having been granted by the Everton directors the use of their ground for the 22 nd .

EVERTON
(Last season Everton won, 2-1)
February 15, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool
“Blues” Visit Bolton.
Drawn Game.
Series of Exciting Incidents, But no Score.
Owing to internationals calls and injuries to players, neither Everton nor Bolton were able to field a full side. Everton were, perhaps, the hardest hit. The meeting of the old rivals was invested with more than ordinary interest, and there was a big attendances. The sides turned out as follows: - Bolton Wanderers: - Edmondson, goal, Baverstock, and Feebury, backs, Gimblett, Rowley, and Whiteside, half-backs, Stokes, Jones, Bentley, Weir and Vizard, forwards. Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (captain), backs, Fleetwood, Wareing, and Grenyer, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Gault, and Uren, forwards. Referee Mr. A. Pellone Oldham

There would be about 20,000 spectators present when Bentley opened the proceedings against a slight wind. In the first minute Vizard put in a rasping centre, but it went to the head of Wareing who slung the ball across to the right only to find it travel out of play. The movement was repeated shortly afterwards, and this time the Evertonians put the ball to the left, where

Gault and Uren
Made progress until Baverstock came to the rescue. During the next few minutes Everton's prospects were of the brightest, but they were undoubtedly up against a hard proposition with the home defenders, who granted little or no quarter. A cross-shot from Uren found Browell offside, and from a further return Baverstock was in the wars as the result of a collision with the Everton left winger. Some few minutes elapsed before the Bolton defender was fit again, and on play being resumed Vizard was the centerpiece of a deadly attack upon the Everton goal. For a few seconds matters were ominous indeed, but finally Stevenson came to the rescue and from a further return by the Wanderers, Wareing deftly averaged danger by a dexterous touch to MaConnachie, who set his left wing going in fine style. Narrowingly in Gault put the ball forward to Browell, and it resolved itself into a race for possession between

Browell and the Keeper
The latter was just in time to clear with a flying kick, and in a trice play was at the other end, where Feebury just missed the mark from a free kick. Up to now Fleetwood had been experiencing anything but a successful time with the home left pair, but Stevenson's anticipation was generally correct, and Caldwell was well covered. A capital sprint by Uren was the next item, and a strong appeal for a penalty against Baverstock passed unheeded. The Blues just now were responsible for some

Clever Footwork,
But they found the Bolton last line of defence a brilliant obstacle to surpass. Then the home players raised the hopes of their supporters as they swept down in irresistible fashion on the Everton defence, MaConnachie was eventually beaten, and Stokes put in a shot that Caldwell saved on his knees. Then an opening was thus made for Jones, who, however, shot wildly over the bar. This was a narrow squeak for Everton, and they signalised the escape by indulging in an advance upon the home goal. The final touch was left to Jefferis, who, however, was much at fault, when from an easy position he

Shot High Over the Bar.
The referee was in the way of a likely shot from Gault, following which Fleetwood showed much resource in coping with thee raids of the Bolton left wing. However, the Wanderers forwards gradually became more aggressive, and Caldwell distinguished himself by clearing clever shots in quick succession from Stokes and Jones. Then Bentley missed a rare chance of taking the lead by miskicking. For some time the Wanderers put the Everton defenders through their facings. There was a better understanding amongst the Bolton forwards than the existing in the Blues line where Browell was not so far a success. A

Talking to Beare
Was necessary. Eventually play ran Everton was again, but the forwards could not get in a telling shot. A weird movement by Vizard next unhinged the Everton defence, but Wareing managed to nip in, in time to avert disaster. Uren under the circumstances could do nothing else and it was unfortunate that his final touch to Beare went astray. Gault and Uren were very prominent, and the inside man created an opening for Browell, which was not accepted.

Half-time Bolton 0 Everton 0
The equality of the play generally in the first half came somewhat below expectation. If anything the Wanderers were the more likely side to open the score, but they lost their chances. The Everton forwards play was not well distributed and this probably was the result of the close attention of the home halves. On resuming the Blues went off at a great pace, and a great pace, and as in the first half most progress was made on the left wing.

The Second Half.
Uren's centre was very accurately anticipated by Baverstock and Edmondson's charge was rarely in danger. Vizard changed the venue with a smart sprint and middle well to Bentley, who however, was wide with his final shot. Then came some clever tackling by Wareing who topped his effort by putting nicely to Gault and the latter sent in a fine shot, which Baverstock managed intercept. The Wanderers swept down in most threatening style, and would probably have opened the score, had three not been a misunderstanding between Stokes and Jones, each of whom failed to take Bentley's pass when Caldwell
Was undefended. The home forwards continued their aggressive tactics, but hereabouts MaConnachie and his confreres were giving nothing away. Grenyer had a very warm task in controlling the home right wing, but he came through successfully and placing Uren in position an opening was made for Jefferis, who, however, lifted the ball over the bar with his final kick. Play for a lengthily period was most scrappy and there was

Not an Outstanding Feature.
Though there were occasionally bursts during which Caldwell defended ably. On one occasion Browell miskicked when close in. The situation continued to be a case of the respective defences prevailing ever somewhat disjointed efforts by the forwards, and a score rarely seemed likely materrialise. Near the close Bentley wrenched his side, and left the file.
Final Score Bolton 0 Everton 0.

TOM JONES
Dundee Courier - Saturday 15 February 1913
Tom Jones (ex-Prescot, Everton, Birmingham and Southport) has joined Barrow.

EVERTON MAKE OFFER TO BARNSLEY
Dundee Courier - Saturday 15 February 1913
To Transfer " Dicky" Downs,
But Second Leaguers Refuse to Part.
(BY LYNX.)
Everton F.C. are club which must have lot of money. Following the announcement that they have offered Bristol Rovers munificent inducements transfer the venue of the Cup tie from the West to Liverpool, the news reaches me that the Goodison Park Club had renewed their! efforts secure the services of Dicky Downs, Barnsley's great back: Again, however, they have been repulsed, and told that they could do with their £2000— the transfer fee offered —whatever they were inclined do, except buy Downs or any Barnsley player. Doubtless Everton were renew overtures to the Yorkshire men; the fact that the latter are now out the Cup ties, but Barnsley are holding on firmly. to what they have got. are now declaring that Downs not the only pebble on the beach, and have turned their attentions to other quarters. They are determined to strengthen their team, and very soon the announcement of an important capture the Liverpool club may be made. Barnsley have changed their policy in most thorough fashion, for not so long ago it seemed to be their destiny to supply the First League clubs with players, but as they havo made quite a lot, of money in the last two seasons the fact ensures independence of fees. They have made it known that they will not part with any one of their players, matter who the applicant may be or what may be offered.
BRISTOL ROVERS REFUSE BIG OFFER TO TRANSFER CUP TIE GROUND.
A representative of the Everton Football Club yesterday afternoon had an interview with the management of the Bristol Rovers, and made an offer for the Association Cup tie between the two clubs February 22 to bo played Goodison Park, Liverpool, instead Bristol. This was declined, as was also offer made by Everton to take the whole of the grand stand seats at each, The Rovers had already agreed on 4s, and they allowed Everton a third of the seats at that price.

EVERTON RES V. BOLTON RES
February 15, 1913. Evening Express.
The meeting of these teams took place at Goodison park this afternoon, the teams turning out as follows: - Everton Reserves: - Hodge; Page and Simpson; Parker Browell, and Gourlay; Smith, Brannick, Simms, Johnson and Wright. Bolton: - Tyldesley; Stott and Slater; Bolton, Bullough and Thomas; Holt, Egerton, Hughes, Hogan, and Coward. Owing to the counter attraction at Anfield road there was only a moderate attendance present when Simms started for Everton, who, had the worst of the opening exchanges. Early on Holt got possession and carried play down up when Gourlay nipped in, and play was returned to the other end. Coward and on the visitors left tried to get away with avail, and when Johnson sent over the bar, while a little later a corner was forced, but this was easily cleared. After Browell had stopped a dangerous rush, Everton got down and Simms passed to smith who centred finely but Stott came to the rescue, while a moment or two later the goal had another narrow escape. So far matters were fairly even. Eventually Coward got away for Bolton, and tested Hodge with a nice shot, which was nicely cleared. A foul against the Blues immediately in front of goal looked promising but the ball was easily cleared, and then Cowell had another try at goal, but sent over. At the other end a corner was forced and after a warm tussle in the goalmouth play returned to the centre. The visitors next participated in a nice passing bout, but Hughes when nicely placed, sent the ball wide of the mark. Simmons several times tried to get away, but failed to beat the visitors defence, and then Johnson sent over the bar, while later Simmos from Brannick's pass had hard lines with a fine shot, which just missed by inches. The Blues were now having all the play warm attack being kept up on the visitors goal. Tyldesley in quick succession having to save the shots from Wright and Gourlay. Nearing the interval, the visitors forwards broke away and a goal look certain when Egerton threw away a fine chance. At the other end Smith shot wide, and then, from a fine pass by smith, Simms opened the score for Everton with a grand shot. Half-time Everton 1 Bolton 0.

BOLTON WANDERERS 0 EVERTON 0
February 17, 1913. The Liverpool Courier.
HONOURS EVEN AT BOLTON.
TWO MODERATE SIDES.
A division of points, as the restart of a goalless draw at Burnden Park, very well fitted the occasion. A game more devoid of feature can scarcely be imagined, and the crowd, numbering over twenty thousand, must have left the ground unimpressed with the fact that they had spent a very unprofitable afternoon. There was scarcely a period during the whole of the ninety minutes of play, that enthusiasm was at all sustained, and when it is stated that the Bolton custodian had not a shot to negotiate of any pretention, an idea can be formed of the utter ineffectiveness of the Everton forwards. The greater portion of the proceeding, resolve itself into a test of strength between the respective defensive, and in this direction there was little or nothing to choose between them. The display given by both sets of forwards could scarcely come under the category of second rare. There was little method in their movements, an inability to turn to useful advantage the support rendered to them by their half-backs, and with it a complete absence of that finishing power that one expects even from players with very ordinary credentials.

FEEBLE FORWARDS.
Defections on both sides owing to International calls and other causes could surely not account for the very moderate display that was served up, and such exhibitions are scarcely calcatuled to chance the popularity of the sport. So far as Everton were concerned, they were like an army without a leader. The pivot of attack was never in touch with those on either side of him, and thus it was a case of vain effort against fortune so far as the wing players were concerned. Once the ball was middled it was lost, and the ground had to be recovered with an expenditure of energy that ought not to have been at all necessary. Uren and Gault were occasionally prominent, as also was Beare, but the unfortunate feature of the whole proceedings was that not a single shot was sent in at the keeper that caused him any uneasiness. On the Bolton side Bentley was little better removed in point of efficiency than Browell, still he at times provided opportunities for his comrades to display their ability, and the Everton keeper had several anxious moments. The appearance of Fleetwood as right half back was followed with considerable interest, opposed as he was to be resourceful an exponent as Vizard. He was well beaten in the early stages, but he eventually had the measure of his man, and for the greater portion of the game kept the Welsh International well under control. Wearing and Grenyer made a welcome reappearance, and sustained their reputation, and while the work of Macconnachie and Stevenson, the latter especially, left little indeed to be desired, a tribute must be paid to Caldwell by reason of the cleverness he displayed in anticipating and clearing several dangerous attacks from both wings. On the Bolton side Edmondson's position was quite a sinecure, and while Feebury was rarely short of resource, Baverstock ran Stevenson close for honours of back play. Rowley was a very capable centre half, and Grimblett was mainly responsible for much of the good work accomplished by the veteran Stokes. Vizard was always dangerous when in possession, but he was none too well supported, and most of his returns were well anticipated by Wareing. As indicated, the game rarely rose above the level of mediocrity, and under the circumstances none could cavil at a division of the points between two very moderate sides. Teams: - Bolton Wanderers: - Edmondson, goal, Baverstock, and Feebury, backs, Gimblett, Rowley, and Whiteside, half-backs, Stokes, Jones, Bentley, Weir. and Vizard, forwards. Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (Captain), backs, Fleetwood, Wareing, and Grenyer, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Gault, and Uren, forwards. Referee Mr. A. Pellone.

EVERTON RESERVES 1 BOLTON WANDERERS RESERVES 0
February 17, 1913. The Liverpool Courier.
CENTRAL LEAGUE
Owing to the counter-attraction at Anfield road there was only a moderate attendance at Goodison Park to witness the Everton and Bolton wanderers Reserves match. Play opened even, but eventually the Blues livened up, and from Smith's pass Simms scored. The second half was strenuously contested, and although both goals were subjected to some warm attacks, Everton had rather the better of the exchanges, but owing to the fine defence on both sides nothing further was scored. Teams: - Everton: - Hodge, goal, Page, and Simpson, backs, Parkers, A. Browell, and Gourlay (Captain), half-backs, Smith, Brannick, Simms, Johnson and Wright, forwards. Bolton Wanderers: - Tyldersley, goal, Stott, and Slater, backs, Bolton, Bullough, and Thomas, half-backs, Holt, Ereton, Hughes, Higan, and Coward, forwards.

A DIFFERENT STORY
February 17, 1913. Evening express, Liverpool
Quite a different story has to be related of the doings at Burnden Park, where a division of points well fitted an uninteresting game. During the whole of the ninety minutes of play, says “Rovers” there was scarcely a period that enthusiasms was at all sustained, and when it is stated that the Bolton custodian had not a shot to negotiate of any pretension, an idea can be formed of the utter ineffectiveness of the Everton forwards. The greater portion of the proceeding resolved itself into a test of strength between the respective defences and in this direction there was little or nothing to chose between them. The display given by both sets of forwards could scarcely come under the category of second rate. So far as Everton were concerned, they were like an army without a leader. The pivot of attack was never in touch with those on either side of him, and thus it was a case of vain effort against fortune so far as the wing players were concerned. Once the ball as middles; it was lost, and the ground had to be recovered with an expenditure of energy that ought not to have been at all necessary. Uren and Gault were occasionally prominent, as also was Beare, but the unfortunate feature of the whole proceedings was that not a single shot was sent in at the keeper that caused him any uneasiness. Wareing and Grenyer made a welcome reappearance, and sustained their reputations, and while the work of MaConnachie and Stevenson, the latter especially, left little indeed to be desired, a tribute must be paid to Caldwell by reason of the cleverness he displayed in anticipating and clearing several dangerous attacks from both wings.

Excursion to Bristol.
The London and Northwestern Railway Co intend running cheap excursions to Bristol on Friday night for the Bristol Rovers v Everton match in the third round of the English Cup tie. One train will travel via Crewe and Shrewsbury and another via Birmingham and the Midland railway. Passengers will return on Saturday at 7 or 7.40 or on Monday.

EVERTON'S PROBLEM
February 19, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool
By the Critic.
The Everton players leave Lime-street Station for their journey to Bristol at 2-40 on Friday afternoon, but as yet it is difficult to say what the team will be. The directors held their usual weekly meeting last evening, but no definite decision was arrived at in regard to the constitution of the eleven. There are sure to be changes from the side, which drew at Bolton, and Harris will, no doubt displace Fleetwood in the intermediate line. The enforced absence of Bradshaw set up a tricklists problem for the dash and resource which this player infuses into the attack is an important factor in any match, more particularly in a cup game against a side adopting the robust style of the Rovers. The problem is where to play Houston to the best advantage of the line as a whole. The Irish international is a most versatile player, but he is certainly better in other capacities than that as pivot, whereas Browell is seen to better advantage as leader than at inside left. Should it be decided to play Houston on the wing, Beare will probably be drafted across to the extreme left, but truth to tell, the Everton directors have a difficult problem to solve in arranging the front line.

Enthusiasm at Bristol.
There is extraordinary enthusiasm at Bristol over the visit of Everton to the Rovers' ground. A correspondent says that the whole of the stand could have been sold at 5s. The ordinary shilling tickets, permitting the holders to get into the ground earlier than those who pay at the turnstiles are selling like hot cakes and crush-barriers will be provided. The supporters of the club have completely reviewed the position, and have recognised that with the overdraft of some hundreds still at the bank the management did the wise thing for the future benefit of the club in raising the prices. Special trainer will be run, from Liverpool. A number of tickets have been purchased for Mr. Charles Bullock's Saturday morning “diner” on the Great western and special facilities are also being offered in connection with the specials to be run by the L. and NW Railways Co.

BRISTOL ROVERS AT FULL STRENGTH.
February 21 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool
Everton will find no lack of enthusiasm at Bristol, for not since the city reached the final stage in 1909 has so much interest been aroused in a Cup-tie as the one tomorrow. The Rovers will be at full. Everton should prove capable of winning outright. Although they have not eighteen Southern clubs in fourteen years have never before been opposed by Bristol Rovers. The latter have a slightly better record than Brighton, with whom Everton drew on the home ground, but on that occasion it must be remembered that Everton were shorthanded right from the start. Then again the Rovers have never beaten a First division team except Notts County. It is now almost certain that Nevins, who was absent from the Bristol team last Saturday will reappear at centre half in place of Walker, who is not eligible. The Rovers therefore, will be to all intents and purpose at full strength.

Fourteen Everton players.
The Everton team will not be chosen until just before the match, and fourteen players made the journey south this afternoon. These are: - Caldwell; Stevenson, MaConnachie Gourlay, Harris, Wareing, Grenyer, Jefferis, Houston, Beare, Fleetwood, T. Browell, Bradshaw, and Davidson. It will be noticed that Makepeace and Uren are not included in the list, but there are hopes that Bradshaw will be sufficiently recovered to take his usual place in the forward line. Through the clubs are in different Leagues, their records for the season will be interesting reading. They are:-

Ply Won Lost Drn For Agst Pts
Everton 27 12 11 4 33 37 28
Bristol Rovers 26 10 11 5 41 40 25

EVERTON V BRISTOL ROVERS.
February 22, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool
Great Win by the Blues.
West Countrymen Routed by 4-0
Everton got two goals in the first five minutes through Fleetwood and Jefferis. A third was scored by Harris inside 20 minutes. Throughout the first half they were vastly superior to the Rovers. A fourth goal was notched by Everton towards the close of the second half.
For their Cup-tie with the Rovers the Everton players made the journey to Bristol yesterday, and fixed up their quarters on the exhilarating Clifton Downs. The knotty problems of selecting the forward line was not definitely solved until three quarters of an hour from the kick off. Earlier in the morning it had been decided to leave out Browell for Fleetwood, play Bradshaw inside left, transfer Beare to outside left, and give Houston the berth, which has made him famous. However, on a final inspection of the ground it was thought advisable owing to the surface being very holding not to risk Bradshaw after his recent injury, and to bring in

Browell as a Partner to Beare
The Rovers were at full strength, and there was generally a confidence among the home supporters that their favorites would run the Blues a very close race for supremacy. The weather was all that could be desired and when the teams lined up in the following order the ground was comfortably packed: - Bristol Rovers: - Roney, goals, Harvie, and Bennett, backs, Morris, Nevin, and Phillips, half-backs, Peplow, J.C Shervety, Roe, Brogan, and Palmer, forwards. Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (captain), backs, Harris, Wareing, and Grenyer, half-backs, Houston, Jefferis, Fleetwood, Browell, and Beare, forwards. Mr. H. Thompson (Surrey)

Businesslike Start.
There would be 18,000 present when Rowe set the ball going for the Rovers against a slight end to end breeze. In the first minute Nevins in collision with Wareing, and an ankle injured, but soon resumed. The Rovers were the first to make a really aggressive movement on the left, where they found strong opposition from Stevenson, and from a throw-in Houston removed the danger. Then Beare got along and centred, but the kick was charged down luckily. Then Roe dashed away, only to be pulled up by Harris, and from a capital move on the Everton left came a successful raid on the Rovers defence. Beare initiated the attack, which Browell supplemented by a brilliant pass to Fleetwood. Roney came out of goal and fell upon the ball, but could not hold it, and Fleetwood rushed it through.

Caught on the Hop.
Play had no sooner been resumed when Jefferis ran through and defeated Roney a second time with a ground shot which the keeper quite failed to anticipate. These successes were recorded with the game but five minutes in progress and both were the outcome of really smart footwork by the forwards backed up by clever assistance from the halves. Next came some bustling forward play by the Rovers, but through they displayed commendable effort they were not equal to the task of settling down to a final shot. A drive over the bar by Browell was the next item, and for some little time it was apparent that Everton held the key of the situation. Once Browell shot in, and the keeper threw over the line. Then Fleetwood drove into the net, but was adjusted offside, and on a further return the home keeper charged down a terrific drive from the Everton centre.

Three in twenty Minutes.
The Blues continued to keep their grip upon the game, after Roney had again cleared, the ball went to Harris, who, with a fast rising ball over the heads of his opponents defeated the home keeper for the third time. Twenty minutes had gone by when the third point was record, and shortly afterwards Caldwell had his first shot to stop from Shervey. Thus far the Everton halves had played a big part in the success of their side, while on the other hand the home trio showed poor judgement in their efforts to break up the concerted movements of the Everton inside forwards.

Brilliant Blues.
A strong shot from MaConnachie almost from the half-way line proved a warm handiful for Roney and some further brilliant work on the Everton left kept the home defence in a constant state of anxiety. Though the Rovers did occasionally get away. They were never really allowed to settle down, and it was only by the merest of luck that the home team had not a greater margin against them. Once Grenyer missed by inches. Then the keeper saved twice from Beare, while Browell had the misfortune to see his hard try glance off the face of the crossbar. Thus far the play had been repeated veering to the Everton left, and Houston had little chance of displaying his skill; still when the ball came his way be was a powerful force to be reckoned with. Then Jefferis failed to steady himself for a pass by Beare just in front of goal, and Bennett nipping in brought about an unexpected clearance. With the sun full in the faces of the Everton forwards they were somewhat handicapped. Still, they were always well in the picture, and continued to monopolise the bulk of the play. Shots followed from Browell, Jefferis and Beare and another by Houston, but Roney was well in readiness for them. The Blues kept up a persistent pressure to the interval, which they deservedly led by three clear goals.

Half-time Bristol Rovers 0 Everton 3
As may be gathered, the Everton players were vastly the superior side. They played class football, bot the type usually associated with cup-ties, and their success was in the main due to the perfect understanding which existed between the halves and forwards. The trio were real providers, and particularly incisive was the play on the left, where Beare, Browell, and Grenyer were great artists. All the other positions too, were capably filled, and for one in a way the Everton rearguard had quite an easy task on hand. The Rovers' forwards never showed much promise in breaking down the opposition, and for the greater portion they were completely tied up by the Everton half-backs. In the closing minutes of the first half Jefferis sent in a terrific shot, which crossed from the crossbar and appeared to screw in the net, but the referee disallowed the point.

Second Half.
Everton took up the running on the resumption, and both wings, with a rare turn of speed, frequently harassed the home defenders. A smart centre from Beare found Fleetwood offside, and then came a dangerous flash to Palmer, who gave Roe an easy chance to put through, but Harris got his head there first and averted disaster. Then came a powerful drive from Houston, but his direction was faulty, and again Palmer made off, only to run the ball over the line. Fleetwood who all along had played, a hard, bustling and successful game, often brushed the home centre-half aside and kept his wing piled with many chances to make headway.

Rovers Roused.
The Rovers' resistance was now forceful and better directed, and for some time the home forwards were seen to better advantage. Row was almost through, and later on Bennett tested Caldwell with a god shot. MaConnachie and Stevenson were prepared for the occasional spirited rushes of the home forwards, and as the game wore on the Everton men again looked convincing. The forwards, however, kept the ball too close when manceurving for position, and more than once there were chances lost, through this defect, of further increasing their lead.

On Top of Form.
Everton again took command of the game as the result of clever understanding, which existed from fore to aft, and in the defence department nothing was finer than the anticipation shown by MaConnachie, whose work was the hall-mark of class. Twice Fleetwood failed to get the ball, and on one occasion Wareing was talked to for his close attention to the keeper. Browell next failed, and then Shervey came near reducing the lead. Still the Rovers' efforts continued to be disappointed, and the really only decisive work came from their left wing.

Final Result Bristol Rovers 0 Everton 4

BRISTOL ROVERS 0 EVERTON 4
February 24, 1913. The Liverpool Courier.
Fa Cup Round Three.
EVERTON'S ADVANCE.
BRISTOLIANS OUTCLASSED.
Contrary to expectations, the Everton team had a very comfortable journey into the fourth round of the Cup at Bristol on Saturday. The West-country team were hopeful of holding their admittedly strong opponents at bay, for had they not dismissed Notts County in the first round, and in the second stage defeated Norwich at the third attempt, and, moreover, prevailed in a league match at Brighton where Everton had failed to score? However, what hopes the Bristol club had of proceeding further in the competition were frustrated in no uncertain fashion at Stapleton-road Taking into consideration the fact that the Rovers had not experienced defeat on their own enclosure since October 5 th , it can only be surmised that the Everton players were fully conscious of the methods whereby they attained such distinction, and that they opposed to these a plan of campaign well fitted to act as a wholesome antidote. Even to the casual onlooker was this quite apparent, for though there were at times grimpses of a style of play likely to unhinge most defences, they were never allowed to develop, and by being thus thrown off their game, it can readily be imagined that the Bristolians eventually proved small fry of the Everton team.

WHERE EVERTON SUCCEEDED.
The keystone of Everton ‘s success was to be found in the half-back line, a department that for several seasons carried the team successfully through, many formidable encounters. The “trio” simply took the game into their own hands, and keeping themselves fully extended not only nipped at its inception any effort at combination by their opponents, but provided their own forwards with opportunities that should have carried in their train even more pronounced results. The typical cup-tie struggle did not by any means form a part of the programme in Saturday's game. The Evertonians played really class football, and though the turf was holding the forwards indulged in the sharp ground passing game to such an extent as to completely bewilder the home defenders. It was of course a great disappointment to the Bristol folk to see their team so thoroughly beaten, but they soon got over this, and it can safely be asserted that not even, the most biassed of the spectators could have put admitted that they had set before them an exposition of the code well worthy of their support. Sporting like, there were admission on all hands that the Bristol team and the supporters of the club had an object lesson on the best to be had in Association football.

INCIDENTS OF PLAY.
Within five minutes the Rovers were two goals behind, both points being the result of smart initiative on the part of the Everton half-backs. In the first instance Wareing put out to Beare, Who centred to Fleetwood, and that player demonstrating the utility of close following up took advantage of the keeper failing to hold the ball. Then Jefferis got possession in almost similar fashion and scored with a brilliant shot, while before twenty minutes had gone by Harris lifted the ball over his heads of quite a dozen players into the net. In the second portion the aggressiveness of the Everton players was even more pronounced, but they discounted their chances by attempting to manceurve for easy positions from which to score. However, Browell completed the tale of goals four minutes from time, and the Rovers were thus left discomfited. It should be mentioned that just on the interval the keeper fielded a ball that was over his line, but the point was disallowed.

CONCERNING THE PLAYERS.
The constitution of the Everton forward line must have come as a surprise to most people in Liverpool. It was recognised that weight was required to combat the dashing methods that had served the Rovers so well in their home games, and thus Fleetwood was introduced as the pivot of attack. Then, again Bradshaw, always an invaluable asset in this direction, was chosen to fill his usual position, but on the report of Trainer Elliott it was not considered advisable, owing to the holding nature of the playing pitch to run any risks following upon the player's recent injury. Browell who had been set aside was therefore brought in to partner Beare on the left, with Houston in the position, which brought him fame. And right well did the whole line acquit themselves, for though it so happened that the play for the most part veered to the left, there was no lack of resource when the right wing pair were in operation. The energy of Fleetwood was a big force to be reckoned with, as he frequently mowed down the opposition, and, moreover, distributed the play with sound judgement. It was not Houston's fortune to be over-prominent, but none could fail to mistake his cleverness, particularly in the last few minutes, when with an opponent almost on top of him, and from what appeared to be an impossible angle, he skimmed the bar with a most remarkable shot. The whole five played with a full cognisance of each other's requirements, and as already indicated, they were assisted by a set of half-backs that maintained the best traditions of the club. Macconnachie was at his best, and everybody that follows Everton football knows what that means, and with Stevenson also up to a high standard it can be imagined that Caldwell had quite an easy time. The Bristol keeper could not be blamed for the heavy margin, for all department in front of him were quite out classed, though at times Palmer, on the left wing showed a good turn of speed and good judgement in flashing the ball across the centre. The gates receipts amounted to £935. Teams: - Bristol Rovers: - Roney, goals, Harrie, and Bennett, backs, Morris, Nevin, and Phillips, half-backs, Peplow, Jusherry, Roe, Brogan, and Palmer, forwards. Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (Captain), backs, Harris, Wareing, and Grenyer, half-backs, Houston, Jefferis, Fleetwood, Browell, and Beare, forwards. Mr. H. Thompson (Surrey)

BRILLIANT EVERTON
February 24 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool
By the Critic
Little need be said of Everton's victory over Bristol Rovers. Although the Blues were without Bradshaw and Makepeace they not only outclassed but completely demoralized their opponents. There was not a weak link in the Everton chain, and their clever and tricky forwards worked with delightful harmony with the respective back division. Their success was not due to any particular instance of individual brilliance, but rather to the general excellence of the eleven as a whole. The Everton front line was essentially in the nature of an experiment, and happily it was a pronounced success. Fleetwood as pivot of the attack imparted the necessary dash, and what was more, swung the ball about with freedom, force and accuracy. Browell and Beare worked well together on the left and Houston realised the highest expectations on the extreme right one of the features of the game being the combined work of Houston and Jefferis.

A Sensational Start.
From the kick off the Everton front line swept down on the Rovers' goal, and in less than five minutes two goals had been scored. The first was particularly well worked for Wareing swung out to the left, and Grenyer twisted it on to Beare, who after tricking Morris and Harvie centred. Fleetwood dashed forward and after a short sharp struggle, he scored with a low shot. From the centre kick Houston and Jefferis by a beautiful combined movement, carried play once more into the home quarters, and finally Jefferis out paced Bennett and scored with a strong low drive. After this double reverse the Rovers could do nothing right and although they fought pluckily to the end they never had a look in, so to speak. The third goal fell to Harris, who receiving a pass from Beare, shot hard and true, the ball rising over the heads of several intervening players and passing just under the crossbar. Everton scored three goals in eighteen minutes and were several times unlucky in not adding to their lead before the interval. In the second half Everton took matters easy without losing their hold of the game, and Browell added a fourth with a grand shot.

EVERTON DO NOT ALTER THEIR TEAM
February 25, 1914. The Liverpool Echo
Manchester City's visit to Goodison Park on Saturday should prove a special attraction to local followers in view of Browell's presence in the visitor's ranks and the fact that the City are one of the teams in the running for the Cup. Everton will field the same side as last week, this of course being the eleven that overwhelmed Sheffield United by 5 goals to nil. The team thus is;- Fern; Thompson, and Macconnachie; Weller, Fleetwood, and Grenyer; Houston, Jefferis, Parker, Clennell, and Harrsion. Everton Reserves travel to Manchester to oppose the City's second string and will line out as follows; Mitchell; Page and Stalker; Harris, Challinor, and Roy; Beare, Brannick, Page, Bradshaw, and Palmer.

Lacey's Medal
A sum of 3s 6d has been sent to my Lacey Medal Fund from “A few Irish Admirers, who hope he will do likewise against Scotland.
From Salford I have received the following letter signed “Evertonian” –Please pardon my first infliction upon you, but I am a constant reader of the “Echo” (which has no equal) and I admire your interesting notes “Bees” is always to the fore. I am enclosing you stamps value 1s for the Lacey medal. That popular player deserves all he gets. He was a “bolt” from the Blues” What Everton have missed! He is a sterling player, and a thorough sport. Good Luck to him!

EVERTON'S CHANCES.
February 25, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool
By the Critic
If only Everton are at full strength they should prove capable of beating either Manchester United or Oldham. Everton last met Manchester United in this competition on their old ground at Clayton, and twice consecutively they have failed to by 4-0 under League auspices on the Everton enclosure. Everton met Oldham in the Cup competition so late as last season, when the Blues won at Oldham by 2-0, Browell scoring both goals. In the League last season, Everton drew at home with Oldham 1-1. and Oldham won at home this season 2-0.

“BLUES” AS SPECTATORS.
February 26 1913. Evening Express Liverpool
By the Critic.
About 300 followers of the Liverpool club travelled to Newcastle early this morning as also did the Everton team who will afterwards make the journey to Tynemouth, where they will stay until Saturday for their fixture with the United.

The Blues' Teams.
The Everton directors met last evening and selected en bloc the same eleven, which gained such a brilliant victory at Bristol. The players will thus have the advantage of gaining a little more knowledge of each other's methods in view of their next Cup match. The Blues' team is: - Caldwell; Stevenson, and MaConnachie; Harris, Wareing, and Grenyer; Houston, Jefferis, Fleetwood, T. Browell, and Bear. The same afternoon Everton reserves entertain Burlsem Port Vale, and will be represented by –Hodge; Page and Simpson; Parker, A. Browell, and Gourlay, Smith, Brannick, Simms, Gault, and Stevens. The same team will oppose Burnley Reserve at Turf Moor on Monday next.

Everton's Cup Tie
Mr. Cuff, the Everton secretary, has received a large number of applications for tickets for the forthcoming Cup-tie at Goodison Park. The prices have been fixed for reserved seats at 5s 3s (Bullens-road); Walton double-decker, 2s; Goodison double decker, 2s and 2s 6d; Paddock 1s; north and south ends (Bullens-road) 1s 6d, unreserved; admission to the ground 6d. There will be no boys' gate. Tickets will be ready early next week and seats can now be booked at Rushworth and Dreaper's Bullocks, Sugg's and Sharp's. There will be no bookings whatever at the ground, and those desirous of obtaining tickets will need to make application to any of the mentioned shops named. Shareholders wishing to act as stewards are required to make application in writing to Mr. Cuff.

 

 

 

 

 

February 1913