Everton Independent Research Data

 

EVERTON 4 BRISTOL CITY 0
February 1 1915. The Liverpool Daily Post and Mercury
EVERTON'S SUCCESS.
Fa Cup Round Two.
Everton easily and decisively settled the pretensions of Bristol City in the second round of the Association Cup competition, although the visitors made a plucky fight, and for the first fifteen of the game had rather the better of the play. The remainder of the first half was fairly even, and Everton may have been somewhat fortunate to lead by two clear goals at the interval. Afterwards however, Everton's superiority was clearly established, and before the end the visitors were soundly beaten. Towards the interval Wedlock injured his right foot and moved to outside right. He resumed in the second period but he was very lame, and after nineteen minutes he retired and took no further part in the contest. Prior to his accident little had been seen of Wedlock, and, although the absence of the great little pivot was a serious loss to Bristol, it had no effect upon the result because as already indicated Wedlock was not the dominating force he usually is, and with a 3-goals' lead Everton had the game well in hand before he retired. The play never reached a very high standard; it was keen in the first half, but the weakness of the Bristol forwards in the second period was very obvious. Fern had not a single shot to stop during the first twenty minutes, and afterwards he was by no means kept fully employed; in fact, he had one of the easiest afternoons. Everton were by no means at their best the absence of Macconnachie, Galt, and Harrison having a decided effect upon the display of the home side. From the outset Bristol made determined efforts to get in the first blow, which usually means much in a Cup-tie. But Everton survived the onslaught, and Kirsopp ought to have scored in the first few minutes when instead of shooting when right in front of Howling, he put the ball across to Palmer, who, a moment or two, after went very near with a shot that rolled along the crossbar. Then the City forwards made their best attempts to score. Neesam, after Fleetwood had blundered, was finely placed, but he lofted the ball high over the bar, and then a terrific shot from Harris hit the crossbar. This paved the way for Everton's first goal, Clennell getting the ball into the net after seventeen minutes' play. Credit for the goal must be given to Chedgzoy. He cleverly beat both Moss and Wedlock before putting the ball across the Bristol goal, where both Palmer and Clennell missed a glorious chance and Howling only partially cleared Clennell was smart enough to get the ball again, and although he fell he recovered and netted with Howling helpless. At the end of the next seventeen minutes Kirsopp added a second point in very simple fashion. Palmer put in a beautiful centre, the ball coming to Kirsopp, who was right in front of the Bristol goal and unmarked. He took steady aim from easy distance, and again Howling was unable to prevent a score. With a lead of two goals, Everton proceeded to make the issue safe, and at the end of a further twelve minutes' play Parker added a third point with a long ground drive, taking a pass from Fleetwood who was standing near the touchline. Then just as Wedlock left the field Wareing rushed the ball into the net with a crowd of players round the Bristol goal. Clennell helping the ball on its journey. With such a formidable lead Everton eased up, and save an excellent run half the length of the field by Broad, the City made poor attempts to reduce the score against them. Fern had few difficult shots to deal with while Thompson and Simpson played an admirable defensive game, and if at times they did take risks they were both capable of covering their mistakes before any damage resulted. Makepeace and Fleetwood were prominent in a sound middle line. Chedgzoy and Kirsopp made a capital wing, the former often scintillating with brilliant and effective footwork. Parker was an excellent leader and Clennell worked with his usual doggedness. Palmer's numerous failures in the second half quite overshadowed his good work before the interval. Howling kept out many fine shots, and was in no way blames for the defeat of his side. Jones and Banfield were sturdy defenders. Moss was the best of the half-backs. The forward line was the weakest part of the Bristol team, although Neesam and Harris occasionally gave evidence of their ability. Attendance 24,000, gate receipts £700. Teams: - Everton: - Fern, goal, Thompson, and Simpson, backs, Fleetwood (Captain), Wareing, and Makepeace, half-backs, Chedgzoy, Kirsopp, Parker, Clennell, and Palmer, forwards. Bristol City: - Howling, goal, J. Jones, and Banfield, backs, Nicholson, Wedlock, and Moss, half-backs, Broad, Brown, Neesam, Picken, and Harris, forwards . Referee Mr. A. S. W. Conroy.

BLACKPOOL RESERVES 2 EVERTON RESERVES 5
February 1, 1915.
CENTRAL LEAGUE (Game 20)
Everton: - Mitchell, goal, Stewart, and McFayden, backs, Brown, Challinor, and Grenyer, half-backs, Houston, Nuttall, Wright, Weller, and Roberts, forwards.

ALTERATIONS FOR THE DERBY GAME.
Liverpool Echo - Wednesday 03 February 1915
Bee's Notes
The teams for the local Derby are;- Everton (v. Liverpool), at Goodison Park on Saturday; kick-off 3.30 p.m.  Fern; Thompson and Macconachie; Fleetwood, Galt and Makepeace; Chedgzoy, Kirsopp, Parker, Clennell, and Palmer.  Liverpool; Scott; Longsworth, and Pursell; Lacey, Lowe, and McKinlay; Sheldon, Banks, Pagnam, Miller, and Nicholl. 
Everton Res (v. Barnsley Res), at Barnsley, on Saturday;- Mitchell; Simpson, and Weller; Brown, Wareing, and Grenyer; Houston, Nuttall, Wright, Howarth, and Roberts. 
Everton have decided once again to make no changes where one was expected.  Thewir team is reinforced by Galt and Macconnachie, and therefore is virtually at full strength.  The men went to Southport today for an airing, and are reported fit wand well. 

TIM COLEMAN TROUBLE.
Nottingham Evening Post - Friday 05 February 1915
FOREST FORWARD PAILS TO ANSWER A CHARGE.
Tim Coleman, the well-known Forest inside right, should have appeared at the Nottingham Police court to-day to answer a charge of being drunk and disorderly in Millstone-lane last night, but when his name was called he had not put in an appearance, and a warrant was accordingly issued for his arrest.

OFF TO BLACKPOOL
Liverpool Echo - Friday 05 February 1915
Bee's Notes
Everton have been doing a type of special training this week, but next week, in view of the oncoming Cup-tie and their rearranged game at Aston Villa's ground on Wednesday, they are going on Saturday night for a week's training at Blackpool.  The kick-off in the mid-week game at Aston Villa is 3-20, not 10.30, as one paper has it -a curious error! Fancy football starting at an hour that would shock a theatrical and pro player!  Everton by the way, can play Harrison in the Cup-tie, his period of suspension having expired in time.  This item is given to answer a number of correspondents. 

Initating Parker
Liverpool Echo - Friday 05 February 1915
Bee's Notes
Another personal item; -A certain individual is passing himself off as Robert Parker.  He's been doing it for some time and this paragraph is intended to warm him that he is seeking what he is certain to find -trouble, Parker's "deputy" is very much like the original, except that he is a bit shorter.  He has been dodging landladies for rent and food, and altogether has worked the trick very well for some time.  He shows sound judgement, that's certain, for it appears that he has always quoted "Bee's Notes" when he is trying his game on.  He never, it is said, attempts anything further than the points mentioned in my notes.  Well, well, what a life we actors lead!  Landladies and other should be very chary in future with anyone pretending to be Parker. 

EVERTON 1 LIVERPOOL 3 (Game 877)
February 8, 1915. The Liverpool Daily Post and Mercury.
LIVERPOOL TURN THE TABLE.
FINE VICTORY OVER EVERTON.
The usual thing happened at Goodison Park on Saturday when Liverpool gained the victory over Everton. So far as “form” is concerned it was the unexpected that happened, but as every enthusiast knows, when these local rivals meet the respective positions in the League table count for nothing; and as Liverpool usually manage to reverse the decision obtained at Anfield, it was in keeping with the natural order of things, that Everton should be beaten. So far as the game was concerned it will certainly rank as one of the best ever played between them. It was keenly fought, full of incident, and, what is most important, free from the slightest suggestion of foul play. During the initial half Everton had slightly the better of the argument, and their lead of a goal to nil, at the interval was deserved, for their forwards finished better than the Liverpool lot. Early in the second period the Anfielders were awarded a penalty kick, from which Sheldon scored. This success brought to the surface all the best of Liverpool's skill, and the play fluctuated much in Liverpool's favour. Liverpool's two subsequent goals were well earned, and although Everton were always triers and often dangerous the superior dash of the Anfielders gained them the day and two valuable points.

From the outset both sets of forwards got to work in good style, and Fern and Scott were early in evidence. The shooting was all from long range, and in anticipation both custodians proved themselves clever masters. The half-backs played a very important part in the initial half; in fact, they quite dominated the play, so much so that the forwards were repeatedly out-maneuvered, and many promising movements were not allowed to materalise. At the end of thirteen minutes' play, however, Clennell scored for Everton. Macconachie successfully challenged Miller, and sending the ball forward Clennell obtained possession in an excellent position, driving home a beautiful ground shot that Scott failed to reach. The nearest Liverpool came to equalising was an excellent attempt by Banks, who from close range levelled a shot at Fern. The custodian, however, brought off a remarkable fine save; and he also excelled himself later when he took a spinning ball from Miller and a hard drive from Lowe with the ease of a county cricket. Parker was ever on the alert for an opening, and Scott was rather fortunate when he tripped a beauty over the bar. The opening of the second half saw Everton still the aggressive side, and a centre from Palmer went right across the Liverpool goal until Chedgzoy sent the ball wide. Then as the positions were reversed and Chedgzoy middled well, Palmer ought to have scored, but he allowed Scott to nip in and kick clear. Several times the Liverpool forwards were served with excellent opportunitise, and although they worked well to a certain point there were no “snap” in their game, and they failed to clinch their work when in the goal area. After eleven minutes' play Pagnam fought his way through the Everton defence, and was nearing shooting distance when Macconnachie brought him down. From the penalty kick , awarded Sheldon scored, and from this stage Liverpool played with greater determined. Still the Anfield forwards displayed their dallying methods, and on two occasions –once Sheldon and then Nicholl –stood stock still with the ball while the Everton defence recovered, and thus two favourable openings were neglected. Fortunately for Liverpool these blunders were neutralised by a goal five minutes later from Nicholl. Macconnachie was somewhat to blame for this second disaster, for as the ball was passed forward by lacey he allowed Sheldon to run through the centre. Pagnam missed the ball altogether, but Nicholl was adjacent to him, and he immediately shot hard and true, the ball finding the corner of the net quite out of Fern's reach. Ten minutes from the end Liverpool made the issue safe with a goal from Pagnam. The Anfield centre took the ball as it came from Sheldon, and with only Thompson to bar his way to goal he took the shortest course, and with a deadly shot he completed a thrilling piece of work just as Thompson bowled him over. Liverpool deserve much praise for their fine victory, although for the major portion of the game Everton were the better side, and it took the Anfielders a long time to recognise their own weakness. Still, when the Anfielders did do so, they undoubtedly held the advantage. Scott brought of some remarkably fine saves, and Longsworth and Pursell did much that was brilliant. Lacey, Lowe, and McKinlay made a splendid half back line, and none did better than Lacey, who fairly revealed in his work. Miller and Nicholl made a capital wing, and Pagnam, although he made several mis-passes and was occasionally slow in getting away, was a capable leader. Sheldon had something to do with all three goals, and he was the most prominent of the line, but Banks was below the standard of the others. Fern kept a grand goal, his manner of fielding the long shots being really clever. Thompson played a good game, but Macconnachie rather spoiled his effective work by two costly mistakes. Fleetwood, Galt, and Makepeace compared favourably with Liverpool's excellent middle line. Chedgzoy, Parker and Clennell stood out well in the Everton attack, Palmer and Kirsopp being the weakest of the line. Att 30,000. Teams: - Everton: - Fern, goal, Thompson, and Macconnachie, backs, Fleetwood, Galt (Captain), and Makepeace, half-backs, Chedgzoy, Kirsopp, Parker, Clennell, and Palmer forwards. Liverpool: - Scott, goal, Longsworth, and Pursell, backs, Lacey, Lowe, and McKinlay, half-backs, Sheldon, Banks, Pagnam, Miller, and Nicholl, forwards. Referee Mr. H. H. Taylor.

SCOTTISH AT GOODISON PARK
February 6, 1915. Liverpool Daily Post
Liverpool Scottish parade at Fraser street this morning at 11.15, and march through Prescot-street, Breck-road, Shaw-street, and Islington. On the suggestion of Lord Derby, for whom no detail is too small in his daily labours on behalf of recruiting, the detachment will visit this afternoon's football match at the Everton ground. The Western Command authorities gave ready permission for this extension of the visit, and rapidly altered all the arrangements already made. The Everton executive have also shown much courtesy in meeting the requirements involved in carrying out Lord Derby's suggestion. The draft, accompanied by both bands, march to the football ground from Fraser-street. It is hoped recruits will follow. The Scots leave Exchange Station at 9 p.m., for Blackpool.

DEPARTURE OF LIVERPOOL SCOTTISH
February 8, 1915. The Liverpool Echo
The contingent of the Liverpool Scottish who are being drafted to the front terminated their visit to Liverpool on Saturday evening, when they left for their training quarters at Blackpool. They began the day with a route march from Fraser-street, and afterwards, accompanied by both bands, they marched to the Everton Football ground. Looking exceedingly smart, they were hailed with cheers from people along the route. In the evening they marched from headquarters, led by the mounted police along London-road, William Brown-street, Dale-street, and Moorfields to Exchange Station, where, as they entrained, they were given an enthusiastic send-off. It is hoped as the result of their visit that recruiting for the Scottish will be brisk.

BARNSLEY RESERVES 1 EVERTON RESERVES 0
February 8, 1915.
CENTRAL LEAGUE (Game 21)

" A Promising " Reserve."   
Liverpool Echo - Tuesday 09 February 1915
 It is good see that Everton Reserve are doing things more keeping with their name-plate." A fortnight ago they won at Blackpool by 5-2, and on Saturday last they rubbed in the Cup-tie verdict on the Barnsley folk by winning 5-1, after being down goal half time. Some of the success was due to the introduction of brainy forward named Howarth—a " local " forsooth. Howarth against Blackpool played on the extreme Wing, and on Saturday was at inside left. scored against Blackpool, and on Saturday helped himself to two good goals. Howarth has been playing and off —a. curious ' term "—with Everton Reserve, but Latterly has played so well, that he has helped manfully victories. He has no help from Nature, his weight and height being of poor use. But he makes up the deficiencies for his skill. His case is one further illustration of trying the young local. Before being tried by Everton he was but a Sefton Park League player; yet his good football has caused him to be given pro form for Everton.

EVERTON'S SMASHING WIN AT ASTON.
Liverpool Echo - Thursday 11 February 1915
Two years ago the writer and 29,999 people stood outside the portals of the Villa ground. were locked out. Inside a crowd of 65,000 was locked in. I vowed I would never again leave a match "to the last minute !" Yesterday, after I had missed one train, I managed to arrive at Aston's ground at three o'clock - twenty minutes prior to the start. I found forty spectators, the majority talking a foreign tongue—they were Belgians. How times have changed ! I was the only member slending  for Liverpool, aye, and Lancashire* not another "outside"' pressman being present to witness Everton smashing victory at Aston, a ground where they have not been fortunate in previous years. Again, how times have changed!
Fore, Roberts
 It was at the Villa ground, if I do not mistake, that I saw M'Kinlay and Harrison make their debut in first-class football. Roberts, the Crewe player, who made his bow yesterday, is a smiling outside left —he's the first smile we have had since George Wilson left our outside left berth—and his sandy hair gives him his nickname straight away. He is small, earnest, plucky, and practical, has a lot to learn and something to forget, and. like Kirsopp. hie. speed neod* attention. Only once did put the ball behind a busy afternoon's work, and bis dribbling was done without hesitation, and was concluded, as wingers' finesse should be, with sound centre. Clennell seemed sink hit individuality more than once so that Roberts should have an opportunity. Here it maybe mentioned that tne team to go to Bradford will be the same as yesterday's, with the exception of Grenyer for Makepeace.
Emphatic, but Not Exaggerated.
It was an emphatic success Everton obtained, and, while due allowance must made for the paltry opposition, praise must be the winners. The onlv goal they yielded was sternly contested by Fern, who is not in ihe habit of going half the length of the field to protest against a verdict. parenthesis, might ask trie F A., when they consider their rearrangement of rules, to take in the subject of the make and shape of clubs' goalposts? Some are round; some are square; some are oblong; some in wood; some in iron. There should uniformity cn this important matter. When Hampton scored the ball appeared to rebound from the crossbar and eventually land Fern's hand it war- but a temporary checu for the conquering Everton team, and they soon proceeded to "carry on." Four were scored eleven minutes, which was rapid scoring that led to the crowd chanting their figure song, " One, two, three, four, five!" Parker scored first (twenty-three minutes), taking in his stride a chance that could have tried Clennell, who was, however, well placed as his comrade. Two minutes later the equaliser aforementioned Parker having been tripped inches outside the penalty area. Gait drove the free kick beyond t wall of defenders, Hardy being unsighted Parker, after this twenty-eighth minute stroke, strode through the bungling opposition and scored again—thirty-four minutes. After the interval Villa's early and eager rushes were baulked, and then Kirsopp tested Hardy, whose indecisive punch let Roberts.  Still Roberts had to show skill to beat a back, ana, having done this, his centre left Kirsopp a golden chance, and the goa!-a-match " jun.or neatly headed the bail beyond Hardy distinctly eased up till fouls became prickly, and thereafter they showed the ViLa that they meant business, and Hardy at this stage made his best saves without being able to stave off Parker's third of the day and twenty-sixth of the season—this goal the result of an excellently placed and paced shot.
Defence in Form.
While giving special prominence to the scorers, mention of the other links is essential. For instance. Fern made a masterly left-hand save when Hampton, who headed, felt, as everyone else felt, goal must the outcome. Then there was the of Maconnachie's clearance off the goal-line, of the destructive Galt's innumerable headers, of Fleetwood's hold on Bache, of Makepeace and Thompson's admirable game, of unexpected style of taking the ball towards the goal—inspiring runs that caused one of a bunch of Midland footballers to shout aloud, Well played, sir." The whole team played high-class football and showed determination and accurate shooting. Kirsopp has not played a better game since was placed the team. old Lament of the Aston club's is " Our backs are not of the Aston Villa standard.'' There need further. The team must remodelled. All the best men have lost their form at the same time.

ASTON VILLA 1 EVERTON 5
February 11 1915. The Liverpool Daily Post and Mercury.
THRASHING FOR VILLA.
EVERTON RETURN TO THEIR BEST FORM.
PARKER'S TWENTY-SIX LEAGUE GOAL FIFTH “HAT-TRICK.”
Aston Villa F.C. have rarely, if ever done as badly as in the present season. Their record bears many hall-marks, and when they have failed to get pride of place in the League or the Cup they have made a bold bid. Their form has been consistently good for a long spell, hence the huge and loyal crowd called “Aston”; hence also the ground improvements made on a massive scale for the purpose of accommodating their large following. This war's outbreak broke the first link, the work being curbed, and business being brisk; the attendance's shrank in all ways. In addition, the team has fallen to pieces, and is now receiving League disasters at home. Bolton recently won at Villa Park by 7-1; yesterday Everton won 5-1, and the novelty of a visiting team scoring double figures was only prevented by some masterly saves by hardy, who twice displayed keen anticipation, Parker and Kirsopp firing point blank, while at other times Hardy caught balls that came to him at an awkward angle, the most notable case being a curling shot by Roberts, who was “tried” and paid for the trial. He is small, earnest, plucky, and practical, has a lot to learn and something to forget and like Kirsopp his speed needs attention. Only once did he put the ball behind in a busy afternoon's work, and his dribbling was done without hesitation and was concluded as wingers finesse should be, with a sound centre. Clennell seemed to sink his individuality more than once so that Roberts, who was making his debut for Everton's first team, should have an opportunity. In other departments Everton were as usual, and the improvement of the half-backs as compared to the “Derby” game made openings for the forwards. Here it may be mentioned that the team to go to Bradford will be the same as yesterday's with the exception of Grenyer for Makepeace. It was an emphatic success Everton obtained, and, while due allowance must be made for the paltry opposition, praise must be awarded the winners. The only goal they yielded was sternly contested by Fern, who is not in the habit of going half the length of the field to protest against a verdict. In parenthesis, might I ask the F.A., when they consider their rearrangement of rules, to take in the subject of the make and shape of club's goalposts? Some are round, some are square; some are oblong; some in wood; some in iron. There should be uniformity on this important matter. When Hampton scored the ball appeared to rebound from the crossbar and eventually land into Fern's hand. It was but a temporary check for the concerning Everton team, and they soon proceeded to “carry on.” Four goals were scored in eleven minutes, which was rapid scoring the Villa crowd of 8,000 spectators did not relish, even though they were forced to admit the manner of goal-getting. Parker scored the first (twenty-three minutes), taking in his stride a chance that could have been tried by Clennell, who, was, however, hardly as well placed as his comrade. Two minutes later the equaliser aforementioned. Parker having been tripped inches outside the penalty area, Galt drove the free kick beyond a wall of defenders. Hardy being unsighted. Parker after this twenty-eight minutes stroke, strode through the bungling opposition and scored again- thirty-four minutes. After the interval Villa's early and eager rushes were baulked, and then Kirsopp tested Hardy, whose indecisive punch left in Roberts. Still Roberts had to show skill to beat a back, and, having done this his centre left Kirsopp a golden chance and “the goal-a-amatch” junior neatly headed the ball beyond hardy. Everton distinctly eased up till goals became prickly and thereafter they showed the Villa that they meant business, and Hardy at this stage made his best saves without having to stave off Parker's third of the day and twenty sixth of the season –this goal the result of an excellent placed and paced shot. While giving special prominence to the scorers mention of the other links is essential. For instance Fern made a masterly left-hand save when Hampton, who headed, felt, as every one else felt a goal must be the outcome. Then there was the occasion of Macconnachie's clearance off the goal-line, of the destructive Galt's innumerable headers of Fleetwood's hold on Bache, of Makepeace and Thompson's admirable game, of Chedgzoy's unexpected style of taking the ball towards the goal –inspiring runs that caused one of a bunch of Midland footballers to shout aloud. “Well played, sir.” The whole team played high-class football' and showed determination and accurate shooting. Kirsopp has not played a better game since he was placed in the team. An old lament of the Aston club's as “Our backs are not to be compared with the Villa standard.” There is need to go further. The team must be remodelled. All the best men have lost their form at the same time C. Stephenson, Bache, and Hampton are now weak forwards; in fact J. Stephenson was the best of the attacking line yesterday. The half backs were uncertain in forward' and defensive moves, and Dobson was woefully weak, a term fitting the full backs, though in fairness to Lyons it should be pointed out that he was knocked through a Galt-drive “getting” his head. The sequel rubbed in the injury, for no sooner had Lyons recovered than Roberts hit him in the head by a centre. Humphries, C. Stephenson, and Galt were also injured in this the first victory Everton have obtained for some years at Villa Park. Teams: - Aston Villa: - Hardy, goal, Lyons, and Littlewood, backs, Dobson, Harrop, and Leach, half-backs, J. Stephenson, C. Stephenson, Hampton, Humphries, and Bache forwards. Everton: - Fern, goal, Thompson, and Macconnachie, backs, Fleetwood, Galt (Captain), and Makepeace half-backs, Chedgzoy, Kirsopp, Parker, Clennell, and Roberts, forwards.

EVERTON TEAM ARRANGEMENTS.
Liverpool Daily Post - Wednesday 13 January 1915
Everton (v. Middlesbrough. at Middlesbrough, on Saturday, kick-off 2.30):—Fern; Thompson and MAConnachic; Fleetwood, Galt, and Makepeace: Chedgzoy, Kirsopp, Parker, Clennell, and Harrison. Everton Reserves (v. Manchester City Reserves), at Goodison Park, on Saturday, kick-off 2.45:--Broniilow; Simpson and Stewart; Brown. Wareing, and Grenyer; Houston, Nuttall, Wright, Johnston, and Roberts.

EVERTON RESERVES 5 STALYBRIDGE CELTIC 2
Feburary 15, 1915. The Liverpool Football Echo.
CENTRAL LEAGUE (Game 22)
At Goodison Park. Everton started very well in miserable weather, for they at once went away and forced a corner, which was poorly placed by Page. They took up the running of the opposite wing where Palmer and Howarth were rather sprightly, and the attack was finished by brown who shot into Tyldersley's hands. During the first quarter of an hour Stalybridge only broke away twice when Mitchell saved from Pike. Dodds and Pike were dangerous for the visitors, but were held in check by Stewart. Following a forward move by Chapman and Byrom the ball was passed back to Mitchell, who slipped and fell, his giving an opportunity to Pike, who slipped in and scored easily. At the other end Nuttall made a bold effort, but failed to score. Foster scored another goal for Stalybridge through slack defence. Tyldersly saved from page and Palmer. In the early stages of the second half Palmer and Nuttall were promince, and Wright finished another move by scoring Everton's first goal. The Blues tried hard for an equaliser, but it did not materislisle, and a fine move by Chapman carried play into Everton quarter's, but no damage was done. A sudden dash followed by Everton at the end of which fortune favoured Wright who scored an equalising goal. Immediately after Wright gave his side the lead, but hurt his knee in doing so and could not resume. Everton played with ten, but still monopolised the play, and Roy put them further ahead. After half an hour's play Wright resumed for Everton. Nuttall scored a fifth for Everton.

BRADFORD 3 EVERTON 0
February 15 1915. The Liverpool Daily Post and Mercury
A BLIZZARD AT BRADFORD
EVERTON BITTER EXPERIENCE.
FERN RETIRE OFF FIELD FROM COLD AND EXPOSURE
THOMPSON TAKES FERN PLACE AND CONCERNED ONE GOAL
GALT AND GRENYER THEN PARTIAL COLLAPSE.
MATCH ABANDONED AFTER THIRTY-SEVEN MINUTES
Everton's experience at Park Avenue may be best described as dire and dreadful. Trained athletic are of course, inured to all kinds of weather, but it is too much to expect human beings to play football in a blizzard of Arctic rigour and severity. Such were the conditions at Bradford on Saturday, and the fact that the teams braved the elements for thirty-seven minutes is a fine tribute' to the stamina. Incidentally, it is also a tribute to the hardihood of Yorkshire sportsmen, for quite 6,000 people faced the storm in order to witness a match, which ought never to have been began. Everton losing the toss, were set the task of confronting a piercing wind, which carried with it flakes of snow that froze as they fell. Accurate football was, of course quite out of the question, yet the game, while it lasted was fast and furious. Everton could make little headway against the biting blast, though Parker, Clennell, and Roberts all got through, only to be baffled at the critical moment. Kirsopp was also unlucky in shooting wide of the mark. Bradford meanwhile were making the running to some purpose. In the first few minutes McCandless missed an open goal, but this was amply atoned for a little later when Bauchop steered the leather into the net. The same player scored a second after a really clever individual effort, and Fern in trying to stop the ball fell heavily. He was helped off the field in a semi-conscious conditions, due to the cold and exposure. The referee consulted the linesmen as to the continuation of the game, and it was decided to go on. Thompson took Fern's place in goal, and was soon beaten by a fast shot by Kirby. This third point was followed by the partial collapse of Grenyer and Galt, and it was then that Mr. Chadwick realised the impossibility of proceeding, and decided to abandon the game. As we have said, it ought never to have been started, and any criticism of the play would be simply futile. Teams (refereed by Mr. W. Chadwick): - Bradford: - Scattergood, goal, Watson, and Blackham, backs, Crozier, Howie, and Scott, half-backs, Stirling, Little, Kirby, Bauchop, and McCandless forwards. Everton: - Fern, goal, Thompson, and Simpson, backs, Fleetwood, Galt (Captain), and Grenyer, half-backs, Chedgzoy, Kirsopp, Parker, Clennell, and Roberts, forwards.

CALDWELL
Stirling Observer - Tuesday 16 February 1915
Reading has signed on their old goalkeeper, Caldwell, the ex-Everton player.  This has become a necessity owing to Crawford, the present keeper, "signing on," for the Army.  Caldwell kept goal for East Stirlingshire several years ago.  

EVERTON & CUP RIVALS SELECT SIDES
Liverpool Echo - Wednesday 17 February 1915
Bee's Notes
Last night the Everton directors met to settle their side for Saturday's third round tie of the Football Association Cup tournament.  The opposition is Queen's Park Rangers and by arrnagement the game will be played at Chelsea spacious ground, the Park Royal Ground having been blocked through railway matters &c.  Everton have recently been playing Roberts at outside leftand though he has played a most promising game, lack of experience was bound to cause him to be emuted, when Harrison had covered the time of his suspension for his affair with Barson of Barnsley, also a cup-tie of course - and therefore Harrison takes his post at outside left.  Last saturday Makepeace and Macconnachie were absent -lucky fellows, for the game was played in a snowstorm that eventually caused an abandoment.  These two artisties are now fit and well, and with Jefferis still unabl;e to take the inside right berth through his troublesome injury, Kirsopp is played as Chedgzoy's partner.  The teams readers; Fern; Thompson, Macconnachie; Fleetwood, Galt, and Makepeace; Chedgzoy, Kirsopp, Parker, Clennell, and Hasrrison. 
At Everton's ground their will be a junior "Derby" Liverpool Reserves having to face this team; Everton; Mitchell; Simpson, and Weller; Brown, Wareing, and Roy; Houston, Nuttall, Wright, Howarth, and Roberts.  Liverpool; Campbell; Speakman, and Wadsworth; Scott, Duffy, and Bratley; Birtrop, Rounds, Watson, Metcalfe, and McDougall. Time of kick-off for the cup-tie is 3 o'clock, but the reserves match starts at 3.30.  The receipts of the junior "Derby" are pooled to the Mersey clubs.  

EVERTON INTRODUCE HARRISON FOR CUP-TIE
February 17, 1915. The Liverpool Daily Post and Mercury
Last night the Everton directors met to settle their side for Saturday's third round tie of the Football Association Cup tournament. The opposition is Queen's Park Rangers, and by arrangement the game will be played at Chelsea's spacious ground, the Park Royal ground having been blocked through railway matters, etc. Everton have recently been playing Roberts at outside left, and though he has played a most promising game, lack of experience was bound to cause him to be omitted when Harrison had recovered the time of his suspension for his affair with Barson, of Barnsley-also a cup-tie, of course- and therefore Harrison takes his post at outside left. Last Saturday, Makepeace and Macconnachie were absent –lucky fellows, for the game was played in a snowstorm that eventually caused abandonment. These two artistes are now fit and well, and with Jefferis still unable to take the inside right berth through his troublesome injury, Kirsopp is played as Chedgzoy's partner.

TEAMS FOR. TODAY.
Liverpool Daily Post - Saturday 20 February 1915
Queen's Park Rangers v. Everton, at Chellsea.  Teams;
Everton; Fern; Thompson, and Macconnachie; Fleetwood, Galt, and Makepeace; Chedgzoy, Kirsopp, Parker, Clnnell, and Harrison.  Queens Park Rangers; McLeod; Millington, and Pullen; Broster, Mitchell, and Whyman; Thompson, Birch, Millar, Simonds, and Donald
Everton Reserves; v. Liverpool Reserves, at Goodison Park; Teams
Everton; Mitchell; Simpson, and Weller; Brown, Wareing, and Roy; Houston, Nuttall, Wright, Howarth, and Roberts.  Liverpool; Campbell; Speakman, and Wadsworth; Scott, Duffy, and Bratley; Birtrop, Rounds, Watson, Metcalfe, and McDougall.

QUEENS PARK RANGERS 1 EVERTON 2
February 22, 1915. The Liverpool Daily Post and Mercury.
A TIE OF SENSATIONS.
EVERTON HARD-PRESSED WIN BY A GOAL.
CAPTAIN ORDERED OFF.
PARKER MISSED A PENALTY KICK.
Fa Cup Round Three
Everton's solid defence gained the day at Stamford Bridge, on Saturday, in the third round tie of the Football Association Challenge Cup, against queen's Park Rangers. It was a game that fulfilled its promise –hard and fast yet not brilliant –and in typical Cup manner, it produced its sensations. One was of very unpleasant character, and led to Galt Everton's captain, being ordered off the field –the third Everton player this season to come under the referee's ban. Only a minute's play remained when Kirsopp helping the well worm defence fell back, and in attempting to kick away, missed his mark. Rangers obtained a corner, and thus a simple error led to serious consequences. The corner was the most of its predecessors in that it was lofted to the goalmouth. Fern took the ball, but he had to go to ground to do so, and the Rangers' forwards and half-backs crowded upon him and his colleague. Fern would not release his grip even though Simons, who attempted to kick the ball from Fern's grip, kicked him. The referee recognised the foul was signalled. His decision was double barrelled as a consequence of Galt having been seen to kick Simons. This offence was we believe, admitted by Galt, who regretted his loss of temper, and pleaded for the remembrance of the kick Fern received as an extenuating circumstance. The London crowd of 33,000 had given the Rangers great encouragement when they had got to within a goal of their rivals, and now some of them lost their balance a couple of soldiers starting to fight on the outskirts of the playing space. Peace was restored speedily, although there was only one policeman on the spot at the critical moment. That Galt should conclude his best game since he joined Everton with an offence warranting the severe sentence of “Ordered off” was simply crimal. He had been dashing, alert, and working hard throughout, and in truth, he had kicked the ball three times to every other player's once. His headwork was his best feature; his height and his ability to head the ball forward when he was unbalanced made much relief to his backs.

THE FIRST BLOW.

The Southern League team opened as expected –determined crudo rushes full of hope. Everton soon wore down these tactics and, settling to their game, pressed Millington and found him wanting. Millington kicked inaccurately, and when he could not reach a header from Parker towards Harrison, he instinctively reached forward with his hand –a foollish foul. Parker took the penalty kick and failed –the ball hit the foot of the upright. Had the referee noticed the goalkeeper's position when the ball was shot he would certainly have ordered the kick to be retaken, because the goalkeeper was a foot or more beyond the goal-line when he kick was taken. This was early in the game, and the value of a goal would have been tremendous. However, the joy was speedily recovered Galt heading a goal from a corner given by the unreliable Millington. The ball was helped to goal by a Ranger, by the way. Until half-time Everton were the' better side, even if their forwards were not able to formulate their regular mode of attack against a brilliant left half and left back. When Everton scored their second goal they were masters and the Rangers to an extent ceased their ultra vigorous, and offside-throwing tactics. The Everton forwards unwisely clung to the ball, and when they were near goal they were not true marksmen. All in a trice Donald, the best forward on view skirted the wing and centred to Birch, who scored. Re-enter the Rangers. They were a new team. Weak forwards became strong, and the pressure applied was simply tremendous. It was hammered at a pair of backs who never faltered for a moment; it was useless. Further more, the Rangers were very weak when the shooting range was reached; in consequence they looked more dangerous than they were. There was always a fear that an inside forward would suddenly find himself able to deliver a really good straight shot, but the fear was not realised, And in truth Fern's troublous times could be counted on the fingers of one hand.

FROM UNDER THE BAR.
Once –Macconnachie dropped back to goal, Fern having been unable to gather a corner kick. Macconnachie, in kicking clear, turned the ball to the square upright, and it rebounded near the goal-line. The referee who was on the spot, at once decided against the Rangers' vigorous appeals that the ball had been over the line. As against this escape the Rangers had two remarkable cases. Once Chedgzoy centred from a near point. It was a presentation goal to Kirsopp; whose failure was very aggravating, because he was easily placed, was unmarked, and was taking a centre of such strength that it was “most takeable.” With a goal from this position Everton would have led 3-1, and the match would have fizzled out instead of firing off. The other occasion was initiated by Clennell, who gave a healthy charge to an obstructing player, and carrying on, passed unselfishly to Parker, whose strong shot hit the goalkeeper's leg. There was a time when Parker got through and shot hard, McLeeod fisting away –the only time during the game that the goalkeeper showed up favourably. The best goal of the match was the point scored by Clennell, who carefully clinched excellent work by Parker, and Chedgzoy. Parker drew on a defender, Chedgzoy taking care to keep on-side, and when the pass was delivered Chedgzoy sped on, and skipping out of the way of a trip trap, he turned inward and crossed the ball to Clennell, whose shot was well placed.

SUMMING UP.
Everton won and deserved to. Rangers lost and deserved congratulations for one of the most earnest games that ever was seen. Their greatest trouble to fern was by means of long lobbing centres from the left wing, where Simons and Donald excelled, the former, however, spoiling his work by persistent fouling of Fleetwood. Miller was a wild centre, and Thompson was no match for Makepeace, whose speed over short distances surprised the onlookers. Pullen and Whyman on the left flank of the defence were great players, and the Rangers' half-back line was dour and capable. Their side did not compare with Everton's at outside right, centre half, left back, and in goal. The footwork of Macconnachie and Thompson was the great point of a game bristling with good points. Clennell, like Makepeace, Galt, Parker, Fleetwood, Harrison, and Chedgzoy, overcome injuries and if Parker, Kirsopp, and Harrison had played a more open game they would have done better work. Kirsopp had an unhappy time in that he produced the first goal scored against Everton in a Cup-tie this season. The teams were: - Queen Park rangers: - McLeod, goal, Millington, and Pullen backs, Broster, Mitchell, and Whyman, half-backs, Thompson, Birch, Miller, Simons, and Donald forwards. Everton: - Fern, goal, Thompson, and Macconnachie, backs, Fleetwood, Galt (Captain), and Makepeace, half-backs, Chedgzoy, Kirsopp, Parker, Clennell, and Harrison, forwards.

EVERTON RESERVES 0 LIVERPOOL RESERVES 3
February 22, 1915. The Liverpool Daily Post and Mercury.
CENTRAL LEAGUE (Game 23)
PLAYER ORDERED OFF.
With Liverpool without an engagement and Everton engaged Cup-hunting, the local interest centred in the meeting of the Everton and Liverpool Reserves teams. What promised to be an interesting contest was really little more than a scramble and ultimately developed into such a display of bad temper that the referee was compelled to order Duffy, the Liverpool half-back off the field of play. Throughout the second half both sides had indulged in much vigorous and often unnecessary charging, and a regrettable scene between McDougall and Simpson was followed by Duffy and Nuttall getting at loggerheads. Liverpool won easily enough, and were no doubt the better of two bad sides. There was little or no attempt at combination, and the play throughout was poor in the extreme. Liverpool scored in the first half after thirty-three minutes' play, Bradley heading through from a corner after Metcalfe had missed a glorious opening with only Mitchell to beat. Everton lost Houston (injured) shortly before the interval, and played through the second period with ten men. After seven minutes play in the second half Watson scored Liverpool's second goal, and followed this up with another point fifteen minutes later. Then Liverpool lost Duffy, and both sides were equal so far as the number of players was concerned. Houston's absence threw the Everton front one out of gear and to this extent there would be some excuse for the lack of cohesion among the Everton forwards. On the other hand although Liverpool did not suffer from this disadvantage till the second half was well advanced, when Metcvalfe took on the half-back position they were little better than their opponents, and the game did neither side any credit. Teams: - Everton Reserves: - Mitchell, goal, Simpson, and Weller, backs, Brown, Wareing, and Roy half-backs, Houston, Nuttall, Wright, Howarth, and Roberts, forwards. Liverpool Reserves: - Campbell, goal, Speakman, and Wadsworth, backs, Scott, Duffy, and Bratley, half-backs, Bartrop, Rounds, Watson, Metcalfe, and McDougall, forwards.

ARTHUR WOODLANDS
Liverpool Echo - Tuesday 23 February 1915
By Bees
A Kirkdale player called Arthur Woodlands, I saw  this latter player some years ago-probably four -when he was playing in Walton.  The day was Christmas Day and taking the morning as a busman would take his hoilday, I crossed the Cabbage Patch and watched Kirkdale.  Woodlands striking me forcibly as a half back of the Abbott type.  I got in touch with him, and found him as sensible off the field as on.  He had a trial with Everton, but terms were the trouble, and eventually he went to St. Helens, afterwards taking a position at Norwich.  Woodlands is now at centre back, and last week he had "control" Shepherd! That's a trial, eh?  

Everton at old Trafford.
Manchester Evening News - Wednesday 24 February 1915
Everton, who were one of the fortunate clubs connection with the English Cup competition, are the visitors to Old Trafford Saturday, and their record this season that the United will need to make biff effort win There has fortunately been a big improvement in the of the Manchester team late, and a victory next Saturday would almost place the club safe in the table After "the poor display t-he attack at West Bromwich 'it is not surprising find West and Meredith again included the chosen eleven being Allman and ' Haywood, O'Connell and Cookson;; Meredith, Potts, Woodcock, West, and Norton.

EVERTON RESERVES 1 MANCHESTER UNITED RESERVES 0
February 27 1915. The Liverpool Football Echo
CENTRAL LEAGUE
At Goodison Park. The first moves were of a give and take character, the initial breakaway coming from Howarth and Page, who, however, were not allowed much room. The United settle down and made matters lively in the Everton quarters and Shreeve was in the thick of the fray which Weller proved master of the situation. Everton tried several attacks on their right, but were well watched by Hudson, although Page was on one occasion somewhat unlucky in not getting in his centre, the ball rolling over the line. At the other end Turnbull nearly got through. Howarth when well placed was smartly robbed by Roberts, and then Moore broke away and gave to Travers, whose shot was brilliantly saved by Mitchell. Everton commenced to have the best of the encounter for Wright went through and shot wide, then hit the upright and a minute later again put meter's wide. Nuttall and Howarth also endeavored to pierce the Manchester goal, but likewise failed in their object, and Page was enable to find the net, after the Everton forwards had shown good passing, Manchester goals had further escapes. Half-time no goals. The second half commenced rather in favour to the visiting side Hodge finishing the first move with a long shot, which went by the side of the post. After a half an hour's play, Nuttall scored the only goal.

 

February 1915