Everton Independent Research Data

 

EVERTON LEAD BARNSLEY
February 1, 1941. The Evening Express.
By Pilot.
Barnsley visited Goodison Park in a North Regional match today for the first time for many years and were opposed by a strong Everton team in which two changes were made. Mercer switched over to the left half for Bentham to take up the right position. Lyon and Catterick came in to the forward positions. Everton:- Sagar (captain), goal; Cook and Greenhalgh, backs; Bentham, Jones and Mercer, half-backs; Arthur, Lyon, Lawton, Catterick and Boyes, forwards. Barnsley:- Binns, goal; K.Harper and Shotton, backs; Harston, H. Harper, and Bokas, half-backs; Bullock, Steele, Smith, Logan and Bray, forwards. Referee; Mr. W.H.E Evans (Liverpool). After some early exchanges in the first few minutes, Bentham took a long shot, but he was well off the mark. Barnsley then took up the attack, with within two minutes, threw away good chances. First Smith skived the ball over the Everton bar, and than Logan shot only weakly from a good position. Everton replied but their shooting kicked direction. Greenhalgh tried a shot which went wide and then Lawton kicked over the bar.
Chance Missed.
Barnsley were soon at the Everton end with good inside forward work, but they bungled a glorious chance when Bullock hesitated with a clear way in and allowed Greenhalgh to recover and rob him. There was good method on the part of the Barnsley forwards, but they were finishing badly. Chances went begging when Bray and then Smith shot wide. After the Everton goal had a narrow escape, from which Sagar extricated them with a grand save, Everton took the lead in 14 minutes. From the kick-out Catterick made his way almost to the Barnsley corner-flag before sending in a perfect centre which Lawton headed into the net. Binns flung himself at the ball but he was too late. From the kick off, Barnsley made a determined raid, and Everton were fortunate to escape when Cook finally headed the ball into Sagar’s hands for him to clear. Lawton was again in the picture with a good shot from a pass by Boyes, but he was unsighted, and the ball cannoned off a defender. Bentham was next on the mark with a powerful close drive shot, but Binns was on the alert and took it well.
• Lambert of Everton played for New Brighton.

BARNSLEY VISITORS AT GOODISON
February 1, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
How Everton Escaped Two Goals.
Everton:- Sagar (captain), goal; Cook and Greenhalgh, backs; Bentham, Jones and Mercer, half-backs; Arthur, Lyon, Lawton, Catterick and Boyes, forwards. Barnsley:- Binns, goal; K.Harper and Shotton, backs; Harston, H. Harper, and Bokas, half-backs; Bullock, Steele, Smith, Logan and Bray, forwards. Referee; Mr. W.H.E Evans (Liverpool). Everton had to make changes for their match with Barnsley at Goodison Park owing to inability of Watson to turn out. Mercer went left half, and Bentham full back into the right half position. Lyon going inside right, and Catterick partnered Boyes on the left. There was only a small attendance and Everton were soon on the move without however, calling upon the Yorkshire goalkeeper. Barnsley replied and should have had two goals in the first ten minutes, whereas they did not have a single shot because their forwards were too much concerned with making sure instead of trying their luck with shots. On the second occasion, Bullock had an easy way through to goal, but to the surprise of all he delayed his effort to such an extent that he never got in the expected shot. Barnsley’s football was of good class in every other respect, but so far Everton had not got working with their customary owing.
A Lawton Header.
While Barnsley continued to show their arts and graces in midfield, it was Everton who struck the first blow. Lawton, heading a picture goal from Arthur’s centre. The goal started with a clearance kick by Cook, who lobbed the ball well up the field so that Arthur was able to run round Shotton and sweep in a beautiful left hook which Lawton cleverly glided right away from Binns. This was at 14 minutes. This set Everton on another goal-scoring expedition and Lawton opened a movement which culminated in a shot from Catterick, who finished off the mark.

GREAT GOAL BY JONES
February 3, 1941. The Liverpool Daily Post
Everton 3, Barnsley 1
Everton Beat Barnsley
By Stork.
Everton beat Barnsley by 3-1 at Goodison Park on Saturday. It is difficult to decide which was the best goal of the game. My own opinion is that T.G. Jones’s free kick caused the greatest thrill. Taken from a few yards outside the penalty line, the shot went home at fullest speed. I have seen Jones do this sort of thing many times during his career at Everton, but I don’t think he ever scored a better goal than this one. A Yorkshire critic sitting alongside me said” What a shot!” I could have told him that this was just an ordinary Jones free kick for which he is now famous. Lawton’s first goal (he scored two) was also a great one and quite the equal of that scored by his colleague, but it was in an entirely different way. It was a header which recalled the great days of his predecessary, Dean, because of its fine execution. Lawton by a simple trick of the head, turned the ball right away from goalkeeper Binns, Lawton did not barge the ball as it came across from Arthur, but simply altered the direction of the ball by the merest touch with his forehead.
Barnsley Fall In Shooting.
Barnsley had played good class football, the only deflect about it being that they could not found it off with their shots. Had they been as good as their marksmanship as they were in the “outfield” they would have scored at least twice before Everton had chalked up a goal. The chances they made for themselves were comparatively easy, but they did not utilise them, and even when they were awarded a penalty kick for a foul by Mercer on Steele, Shotton failed largentably to direct the ball anywhere near the goal. It has always been a puzzle to me why full backs should be called up to make penalty kicks when there are five forwards whose primary job is to score goals. However, Shotton’s miss was a bad one. There were other misses of equal importance on both sides but at long last Barnsley scored through Bray, who snapped up the ball which Sagar, had pushed out from Smith and banged it back into the net. But by this time Barnsley had lost some of their sparkle and were playing second fiddle to Everton, who were now thoroughly warmed in and complete masters of the situation. Then came Jones’s shot, and the Yorkshiremen stared defeat in the face, but for a time –about fifteen minutes –they had played better football, but could not keep it going, and having had their moments the Everton defence saw to it that they never got on top again. Lawton’s second goal was a great piece of opportunism. He picked up a Catterick pass, a rather quick one at that, and had the ball in the net in a flash. There were only just over 2,000 people to see this game, which produced some good football and more than anything else, four fine goals and as goals are the very salt of the game, they were greatly satisfied. Everton: - Sagar (captain), goal; Cook and Greenhalgh, backs; Bentham, Jones and Mercer, half-backs; Arthur, Lyon, Lawton, Catterick and Boyes, forwards. Barnsley: - Binns, goal; K.Harper and Shotton, backs; Harston, H. Harper, and Bokas, half-backs; Bullock, Steele, Smith, Logan and Bray, forwards. Referee; Mr. W.H.E Evans (Liverpool).

EVERTON NARROW LEAGUE MARGIN.
February 4, 1941. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log
Everton are steadily narrowing the margin that separates then from Manchester City, the leaders. As a result of Saturday’s games, the City are now only 11 in the lead. Everton had to fight hard all the way for their 3-1 home victory over Barnsley. The Yorkshiremen lived up to their reputation of playing spirited football, to which there was added skill and craft. The Goodison club, however, while matching them in three attributes, had a winning “card.” It was deadly first-time shooting gave Binns, in the Barnsley goal, a full afternoon’s work. The issue was in doubt until ten minutes from the close, for at that stage Everton led 2-1, with Barnsley having missed a penalty shot. They were too, showing improvement in their finishing. Then T.G. Jones sealed their fate with a terrific shot from a free kick just outside the penalty area. Everton’s half back line and again on top of its form with Mercer’s, T.G. Jones and Bentham plying the men in front with ample opportunities.
Half-backs Shine.
While in field work there was little to chosen between the two sets of forwards, the Everton line always knew the way in to goal, Lawton was in his usual good form, and he had a grand partner in Catterick at inside right. It was from passes by Catterick that Lawton got his two goals. Cook and Greenhalgh, the Everton full backs, had a gruelling time, but their effective breaking-up of the Barnsley raids gave Sagar much less work to do than his opponents in the Barnsley goal.

EVERTON’S SLOW STARTERS
February 3, 1941. The Liverpool Echo.
Ranger’s Notes
For the first quarter of an hour at Goodison Park, it looked as though Barnsley were going to create a surprise but when once Everton had warmed to their work the Yorkshire side gradually failed out, until finally, though at no time did the visitors cease striving, they was only one team in it. For some time now Everton have been like a cat on a cold day –they run unevenly and misfire occasionally for the first few minutes –but they get warmed up very few clubs can stand up against them. A goal to Lawton after fifteen minutes set them on the victory path, a second made things look easier but the third goal down at the finest free kick goal I have seen for ages. Need it be said that Jones was the score? From three yards outside the penalty line it sped into the net at such a race that Binns the Barnsley goalkeeper –and a clever, experienced one at hat –sat on the ground for some seconds after making his drive. It is becoming rather a monotonous job referring to Jones’s display week by week. He is always the same –never a mistake, rarely a foul, as brilliant a centre half as the game has ever known and not an sound of “side” or showmanship about him. Mercer was another star though for once in a way Joe allowed distinction to pass when he return tit-for-tat and gave away a non-productive penalty his offence failing to escape the eagle eye of Referee Evans, one of the finest of war-time officials, who is always on top of the play, it matter have quickly it veers from end to end. Lyon., though not quite as good as on previous occasions, confirmed the good opinion already formed of him. Catterick I reckoned much better at inside forward than in the middle, while Lawton gave a better display of heading than I have ever seen from him before. The way he frequently deflected the ball was masterly.

INTERNATIONAL CALLS ON EVERTON PLAYERS.
February 5, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
Ranger’s Notes
It is rather a pity that the meeting of Liverpool and Everton at Anfield on Saturday should clash with the England-Scotland international at Newcastle, for it means the clubs will be without some of their star performers. Everton will be minus Lawton and Mercer and Liverpool probably without Bartram. In the latter’s case there is a doubtful the moment whether he will be able to get away to make the long journey North, if he can’t, he will be available, for Liverpool; otherwise Mansley will deputise. Liverpool have chosen fourteen probables as follows:- Liverpool: - Bartram; or Mansley; Stuart, Lambert; Kirkby, Turner, Spicer; Paisley, Niuwenhuys, J. Search, Done, Polk, Liddell, Finan. Everton; Sagar; Cook, Greenhalgh; Bentham, Jones (TG), Jones (JE); Arthur, S.Simmons, Catterick, Stevenson or J. Lyon, Boyes. Kirkby is a former Dundee United full back now in the Air Force at a North Western station, and Finan is the ex-Blackpool centre forward or outside left also in the R.A.F. since joining Blackpool some six years or so ago he has totted up a respectable total of goals, and providing he can get leave to play should be a useful acquisition to Liverpool. This will be the first Regional meeting between Liverpool and Everton this season, although they have already met two in the Lancashire Cup, honours on this going to Everton. Unless they come together in the League Cup the draw for which is being made at Newcastle, this week-end there will be only four Liverpool games this season, compared with eight a year ago. So Saturday’s pairing at Anfield ought to be at least a bigger crowd than usual.

ANOTHER ANFIELD DERBY
February 6, 1941. The Evening Express
Pilot’s Log
The soccer programme for the week-end includes another test of strength between Liverpool and Everton. It will be their fourth meeting of the season, and the second under North Regional auspices. The other two clashes were in the first round of the Lancs, Senior Cup tourney. Saturday’s clash will again be at Anfield, where on Christmas Day, Liverpool triumphed to the extent of 3-1 and inflicted the Goodison club’s second reverse of the season. On the three games already decided, Everton hold the advantage, for they won both the Lancashire cup games 2-1 at Anfield and 4-1 at Goodison Park.
Team Sheets
Everton have team changes for Mercer and Lawton have been chosen to play for England against Scotland in the Red Cross match at Newcastle-on-tyne on Saturday. Jones (JE) comes in at left half for Mercer. In the attack, S. Simmons will be at inside right; Catterick, who played at inside left against Barnsley, moved to centre forward while the inside left position will be filled either by Stevenson or J. Lyon. Against Barnsley, Lyon figured at inside right. Liverpool have not yet decided on their eleven, but the players from whom they hope to be able to select their side include Kirkby (Dundee) and Finan (Blackpool). Everton; Sagar; Cook, Greenhalgh; Bentham, Jones (TG), Jones (JE); Arthur, S.Simmons, Catterick, Stevenson or J. Lyon, Boyes. Liverpool: - Bartram; or Mansley; Stuart, Lambert; Kirkby, Turner, Spicer; Paisley, Niuwenhuys, J. Search, Done, Polk, Liddell, Finan.
Everton “A” (v. St. Teresa’s at Goodison Park on Saturday);- F. Foster; J. Ross, H. Kevan; N. Hankin, Hill, J. Hendry, R. Newstead, H. Lindaman, J.Powell, H. Williams, P. Steele.

LEAGUE RECORDS
February 7, 1941. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log
In eleven away game the Goodison Club have won five times and drawn three games, while Liverpool have a similar record for home games. Mercer and Lawton will be absentees from the Everton side –they will be playing for England in the Red Cross match at Newcastle on-Tyne –but the Goodison Park club will be strongly represented, and hope to reverse the previous league results. Liverpool will also have a player in the Newcastle match in Bartram, who has been chosen to keep goal for England. The Anfielders, who hope to include Kirkby (Dundee) and Finan (Blackpool), will take a lot of beating. One thing is certain, it will be a struggle. Everton; Sagar; Cook, Greenhalgh; Bentham, Jones (TG), Jones (JE); Arthur, S.Simmons, Catterick, Stevenson or J. Lyon, Boyes. Liverpool: - Bartram; or Mansley; Stuart, Lambert; Kirkby, Turner, Spicer; Paisley, Niuwenhuys, J. Search, Done, Polk, Liddell, Finan.

ANFIELD DERBY ATTRACTION.
February 7, 1941. The Liverpool Echo.
Ranger’s Notes.
Liverpool, home to Everton, make their first appearance at Anfield since the first Saturday in January, when their visitors then were also Everton in the Lancashire Senior Cup-tie. Liverpool won that time, but lost the round on the aggregate score after being beaten at Goodison Park in the absence of Bartram ? (Everton won both games). Liverpool will have Mansley now of the R,A.F in goal and providing permission is received from his club in time, Kirkby, of Dundee United, will partner Stuart at full back. Everton bring in JE. Jones and Catterick for Mercer and Lawton. Bentham crossing over to right half. As this is the next to the last meeting between Liverpool and Everton this season unless they come up against each another in the League War Cup of Liverpool Senior Cup competition, there ought to be a good crowd and if the standard of football is as good as the last game at Anfield, the spectators will get more than their money’s worth. Teams:- Everton; Sagar; Cook, Greenhalgh; Bentham, Jones (TG), Jones (JE); Arthur, S.Simmons, Catterick, Stevenson or J. Lyon, Boyes. Liverpool: - Bartram; or Mansley; Stuart, Lambert; Kirkby, Turner, Spicer; Paisley, Niuwenhuys, J. Search, Done, Polk, Liddell, Finan.

L’PPOL’S BRISK START IN “DERBY” GAME.
February 8, 1941. The Evening Express.
By Pilot.
Liverpool and Everton were engaged in their fourth “Derby” game of the season at Anfield today. Liverpool had to make changes, Jackson, the Everton player, who has occasionally played for Liverpool was in goal for the Anfielders. “Owen” of Tranmere Rovers, came in at left full back. Liverpool;- Jackson (Everton), goal; Stuart and Owen (Tranmere Rovers), backs; Lambert, Turner, and Spiers, half-backs; Niuwenhuys, Paisley, Done, Polk, and Liddell, forwards. Everton:- Sagar, (captain) goal; Cook and Greenhalgh, backs; Bentham, Jones (T.G), and Jones (J.E), half-backs; Arthur, S. Simmons, Catterick, Stevenson and Boyes, forwards. Referee Mr. W.H.E. Evans (Liverpool). Liverpool were early on the attack through good work by Polk, and when there was promise of a good chance a final pass to Liddell went astray. Liverpool kept up the attack with two strong kicks by Turner but they found Cook in dour mood, both attacks were beaten off. A moment later Done tried a header, but he was bristled off the mark by Greenhalgh. Polk again came into the picture with some neat footwork, beating two opponents and giving a pass to Paisley, whose final shot went over the bar. There was a thrill when Liddell slipped around Cook to send in a perfect centre. Done tried to breast through, but the ball went into the hands of Sagar and was cleared. There was promise of an Everton attack when Stevenson and Boyes came through, but it did not last long, for Liverpool were again in the Everton half through Niuwenhuys, but he put too much behind the ball with plenty of room to spare for manceurving. The Everton goal had another narrow escape when Done tried to crash the ball through. Sagar cleared only to give Niuwenhuys a chance, but he sent the ball over the bar. Liverpool had another free kick and this time Nieuwenhuys sent it wide of the Everton post. After a brief Everton raid, in which T.G. Jones tried to send Catterick away, Spicer beat off the attack and gave Liddell a chance at the Everton end. His centre however, was easily dealt with by sagar. Everton returned, and Catterick made a good pass to Simmons, whose powerful shot went just wide of the post. There was danger in an Everton attack, but the Liverpool defenders packed the goal area well and the danger was averted.
Everton “A” v.. St. Teresa’s
At Goodison Park. The opening play was fast, with Everton having the balance of the play. A well combined move from the Everton left led to Steele putting across an accurate centre that was well cleared by McGrain.
Full time; Everton “A” 3, St. Teresa’s 1

JACKSON IN GOAL AGAIN.
February 8, 1941. The Liverpool Echo.
But This Time For Liverpool.
By Contact.
Liverpool;- Jackson (Everton), goal; Stuart and Owen (Tranmere Rovers), backs; Lambert, Turner, and Spiers, half-backs; Niuwenhuys, Paisley, Done, Polk, and Liddell, forwards. Everton: - Sagar (captain) , goal; Cook and Greenhalgh, backs; Bentham, Jones (T.G), and Jones (J.E), half-backs; Arthur, S. Simmons, Catterick, Stevenson and Boyes, forwards. Referee Mr. W.H.E. Evans (Liverpool). Liverpool and Everton met in yet another war-time fixture, a Regional match, at Anfield and George Jackson, the Everton full back, who is nothing if not versatile because the goalkeeper for the day for his club’s greatest rival. There were about 5,000 people to see Polk make an unexpectedly good opening dribble which fizzled out when Paisley was all at sea as to how far up the field he was. There was much keenness but nothing of any consequence in the early moments, till Polk made yet another grand solo essay, the finish this time being a too-lofted shot by Paisley. Done, a stranger to the Liverpool team for many months, had every chance of converting a lovely Liddell centre, but the ball came to him none too kindly and from two or three yards out he made one of those extraordinary misses from point blank range.
Badly Topped.
“Nivvy” too had a snap shot chance from Liddell when Done took a through-pass and got the Everton defence into a tangle. A free kick against Tom Jones, who explained that Done had backed into him and forced him to use his hands, was taken by “Nivvy” whose shot was badly topped. Jackson did not handle the ball for many minutes and the Everton attack was badly in evidence to many extent. Sagar was kept busy and a close range shot by Polk was a handful for him. Liverpool were still the more effective side, and a clash by full back Stuart from inside his own half was anxiously watched over the top by Sagar. The best shot and certainly the best incident of the game so far, came when Liddell drifted into the edge of the penalty area and unexpectedly let loose one of his fiercest shows which marked the cross-bar unmistakably before passing out of play. Sagar had to concede a corner from a Spicer free kick when tackled by Liddell. Catterick scored for Everton on the half hour mark.

EVERTON WIN AT ANFIELD
February 10, 1941. The Liverpool Daily Post
Liverpool 1, Everton 3
Catterick’s Hat-Trick
By L.E.E
Still one more war-time meeting of Everton and Liverpool went in Everton’s favour. Their 3-1 success at Anfield was deserved, and Liverpool’s only consolation was that they were forced to play a full back in goal, and therefore, at best could only have had scant chance of escaping defeat. Geo Jackson, an Everton player, took over this vital job. Could any Everton player in a Liverpool team have a more unenviable ask than to pick the ball out of the net overlooked by Spion Kop? I doubt it. Thus was Jackson’s task after half an hour’s play. The irony of an Everton goal at that time was twofold, since Liverpool had things pretty well their own way and had seemed the more likely to take the lead. Jackson’s fumbling of a Catterick header was excusable, “but not when playing against Everton,” was the general impression of the Kop! Actually this full back turned goalkeeper had many grand saves to his credit. He made them as if to the manner born, too. There was more at fault with the Liverpool attack than with him.
Defence Too Strong.
Catterick having scored a second time, the Everton defence for once remained stone cold while Done went in to make it 2-1. Catterick “hat-trick” in what proved to be much the inferior half. What chances Liverpool had of battling on for the equaliser went when Paisley had to be taken off injured. He came back, but not in a condition to be effective. The reshuffling made to place him at outside left was not successful. On paper and on the field the Everton defence was too strong. The link-up between Jones and other members was superb as it often is, and unless Liverpool got goals they were always likely to be defeated. There have been many more powerful Everton front lines and not every until deserved to be on the winning side. Liverpool’s best were Turner, who came through with the ball splendidly after some grand tackles and the youngsters on either side of him, and Owen and Liddell. For forty five minutes the football was first-rate. Later when a lack of training was in evidence, it slowed up and was not nearly so attractive. Liverpool;- Jackson (Everton), goal; Stuart and Owen (Tranmere Rovers), backs; Lambert, Turner, and Spiers, half-backs; Niuwenhuys, Paisley, Done, Polk, and Liddell, forwards. Everton:- Sagar (captain), goal; Cook and Greenhalgh, backs; Bentham, Jones (T.G), and Jones (J.E), half-backs; Arthur, S. Simmons, Catterick, Stevenson and Boyes, forwards. Referee Mr. W.H.E. Evans (Liverpool).
• Lawton scored for England against Scotland at Newcastle, Scotland winning 3-2, Mercer also played and for Scotland Caskie.

EVERTON NARROW LEAGUE RACE MARGIN.
February 10, 1941. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log
Everton have again narrowed the margin in their race with Manchester City for the championship of the North Regional. With two games in hand, the Goodison club are now only .06 in arrears. Everton were good value for their 3-1 victory over Liverpool at Anfield. Both teams provided entertaining football. While there was plenty of sting in the Liverpool attack it fell short of Everton’s superior methods. The quick-moving Everton forwards, with Catterick a deadly spear-head, always moved to purpose and few shooting chances were missed. In the early stages when Liverpool were definitely on top, opportunities came their way but they were frittered away by wild shooting. When the Everton defence, however, “warmed up” the chances became fewer, and Cook, Greenhalgh and T.G. Jones proved the chief stumbling blocks to the Liverpool raids.
Speed and Thrust
It was not until the second half that Everton’s superior speed and thrust pressed the final result. True, for a period Liverpool lost the services of Paisley (injured) and when he returned he was little more than a “passenger” but by this time Everton’s wearing down process was in operation against a stubborn Liverpool defence in which Stuart, Owen and Turner stood firm. Turner, at centre half, in a gruelling afternoon’s work, tackled well and placed excellently. The versatility of Jackson, the Everton full back, playing in goal for Liverpool, was again in evidence, and he provided plenty of thrills. Deputising for Lawton, Catterick, proved the star of the game, and his hat-trick of goals were all due to the policy of first-time shooting. His inside men, Stevenson and S. Simmons, did most effective work. The scorers were for Everton, Catterick (3) and for Liverpool Done.

EVERTON’S VICTORY AT ANFIELD
February 10, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
Jackson’s Fine Goalkeeping.
Ranger’s Notes.
One more curiously has been added to war-time football’s ever increasing store of queers happenings, and in years to come I can see the youngsters of a future generation testing one another’s. Soccer knowledge by propounding the teaser –when did an Everton full back play goal for Liverpool?” Those whose hobby it is to note such curiosities no doubt have the date down already in their little blue books –February 8, 1941, and George Jackson the player. And a right good job he made of his task. True the Kopites had a few sarcastic remarks to make when he fell backwards into his goal in saving a header from Catterick, and gave Everton a point which was all against the run of the play, but afterwards he played almost faultlessly, and in the second half particularly made some really excellent saves. Several efforts from his Everton colleagues were fisted over the bar in the best approved style, and if his performances hadn’t the hall-mark of an Elisha Scott or a Sam Bartram, it was at shy rate a very creditable exhibition, and maternally contributed to keeping Everton’s score down during a period when the Blues were well on top.
Slow To Start.
As usual Everton were slow starters, and for close on half an hour it was almost one-way traffic –towards the Everton goal, when Sagar should have been beaten by Done and Nieuwenhuys in the first ten minutes. This was the first phase of a three-phrase match. The second one came after the visitors had warmed to their work, and a hat-trick by Catterick –with a goal by Done sandwiched between the second and third –put Everton in a position which was certainty not warranted on the balance of play, but was rather the reward of Catterick’s opportunism. The final phrase saw Liverpool fighting back hard to get on level terms, a rather forlorn hope because of the lack of a spearhead in attack and the solidity of Everton’s dove-tailed. Done could make no impression on Jones, yet instead of realising that fact and distributing play to his wings, he kept on trying to bore a way through. The goal he did get was parity a gift due to Jones and Cook leaving it to each other, though credit must go to Done for the quickness with which he took the opening and whipped the ball in. Though not so brilliant as usual Jones was still the outstanding player on the field, with Turner the Liverpool centre half, not far behind. Everton missed the genius of Mercer, for Bentham well as he played has not quite the same gift for openings up avenues of attack. Lambert and Spicer did good work, but Liverpool were not well served at inside forward, and with Paisley a passenger all the second half, the forward line was naturally at a disadvantage. Liddell was their best attacker, and his shot which struck the bar early on was a real gem, which even Lawton at his best could not have bettered. Everton were well served by their rear defence, when Cook was in ausdourest mood, but Stevenson and Boyes did not work with their accustomed smoothness and Simmons was not as good as I have seen him previously. Owen, borrowed once again from Tranmere played another sound game. The Anfield air seems to suit him, for he has done well here on every appearance.

EVERTON’S CHANCE TO MAKE PROGRESS
February 11, 1941. The Liverpool Echo.
Ranger’s Notes
Everton have a stiffer task against Manchester United, particularly at the first of the two games is at Old Trafford. On their earlier Regional visit there, however, Everton brought off a goalless draw, after winning 5-2 at Goodison Park, and though this is no, infallible guide to Cup prospects, I shall be surprised if Everton so not win fairly comfortably on the aggregate.
All Together Spirit.
To be candid, I fancy them strongly to go a long way in the hunt, and may be turn out eventual winners. They have been enjoying an advantage denied many clubs that of playing a practically unchanged side week by week in spite of the fact that seen of the eleven are in the Forces. The benefit of this is reflected in the team spirit and all-round understanding which permeates the side. Though Saturday’s team is not definitely announced, Everton hope to be back at full strength. All being well Lawton and Mercer are expected to be available after last week’s international absence, and Watson, now recovered from his ankle trouble –a legacy from an injury received some four months back –resumes at left half. One enforced changes comes about through the departure of Arthur, who has been moved to a new depot, and whose place at outside right will probably be taken by Catterick. If the latter does as well on the wing as he has in the middle and inside position there will be no weakening there.

EVERTON’S CHANGES
February 12, 1941. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log
Everton have five team changes for their Football League War Cup first round game with Manchester United at Old Trafford on Saturday. Two of them are positional. Mercer and Lawton back from international match duties, take up their accustomed places at right half and centre forward repetitively, and Watson, having recovered from his injury resumes at left half, Bentham, at right half last week, reverts to inside right and Catterick, who at centre forward, scored all three goals against Liverpool at Anfield takes up the outside right position to the exclusion of Arthur who is expecting to be moved from the district this week. Everton; Sagar; Cook, Greenhalgh; Mercer, Jones (TG), Watson; Catterick, Bentham, Lawton, Stevenson, Boyes.

EVERTON’S CHANGES AT OLD TRAFFORD
February 14, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
Ranger’s Notes.
The League cup, which starts in real earnest tomorrow, promises to be even more successful than its predecessor of last season, and to provide that keen competitive interest which is so vital to football, but which has been missing from the game hitherto. Compared with some Everton have a pretty stiff hurdle to surmount, but if the Blues reproduce their best form I think they can do it all right. Manchester United have recalled some players previously on loan to other clubs and will turn a side not much below pre-war strength. Asquith has been withdrawn from Barnsley and Rowley from Walsall, and with Smith and Carey included, the attack is good enough to give Everton plenty to think about. Bar the absence of Voce at centre half, the defence is the same as in pre-war days, so it is lucky for Everton they also are pretty well up to strength. Apart from Catterick, who plays at outside right, the visitors field their championship side, and, on paper at any rate the Old Trafford followers have the prospect of a match which should reach a high standard all round. Manchester United; Breedon; Redwood, Roughton; Warner, Porter, Whalley; Bryant, Carey, Smith, Asquith, Rowley. Everton; Sagar; Cook, Greenhalgh; Mercer, Jones, Watson; Catterick, Bentham, Lawton, Stevenson, Boyes.

EVERTON’S TASK.
February 14, 1941. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log
Everton have a big task in their first game in opposing Manchester United at Old Trafford, but if they can hold their own, they should in the return match certain of appearance in the second round. The Goodison Park brigade will be strongly represented, but they will be up against a side which can claim five successes in eleven home games. On the other hand, Everton can point to six away win in 12 matches, and a goal average of more than two to one for all games, against the United’s 1.23. I fancy both Everton and Liverpool to win. Everton; Sagar; Cook, Greenhalgh; Mercer, Jones (TG), Watson; Catterick, Bentham, Lawton, Stevenson, Boyes.

EVERTON IN KEEN DUEL
February 15, 1941. The Evening Express.
By Watcher.
Lawton and Mercer returned to the Everton team from international duty, for the Blues’ war cup game, against Manchester United at Old Trafford. Manchester United:- Breedon, goal; Redwood, Roughton, backs; Warner, Porter, and Whalley, half-backs; Bryant, Carey, Smith, Asquith, and Rowley, forwards. Everton:- Sagar (captain), goal; Cook and Greenhalgh, backs; Mercer, Jones and Watson, half-backs; Arthur, Bentham, Lawton, Stevenson and Boyes, forwards. Referee; Mr. G. Twist (Westhoughton). There was about 5,000 people present when the teams appeared. Everton attempted to make some headway when Jones and Stevenson combined cleverly only to be checked by the Manchester centre half, Porter. Immediately following this, the home side started a movement, Warner sending Brown away, but the outside right centred hurriedly and Sagar had no difficulty in gathering the light ball. Everton were moving with precision and the Manchester defence for some time was under pressure without the Manchester goalkeeper being troubled. The Everton goal had a narrow escape after six minutes when Rowley struck the bar. Immediately after this escape, Manchester took the lead. Whalley took the kick, and although Sagar seemed to touch it with his fingers, he could not stop the ball entering the net.

MANCHESTER U V. EVERTON
February 15, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
By Stork.
Manchester United: - Breedon, goal; Redwood, Roughton, backs; Warner, Porter, and Whalley, half-backs; Bryant, Carey, Smith, Asquith, and Rowley, forwards. Everton: - Sagar (captain), goal; Cook and Greenhalgh, backs; Mercer, Jones and Watson, half-backs; Arthur, Bentham, Lawton, Stevenson and Boyes, forwards. Referee; Mr. G. Twist (Westhoughton). Manchester United, and Everton turned the teams fully representative by their clubs. This is in common in these days of team changes. Actually Everton, with one exception, had their full championship side on duty. There would be round about 5,000 people at the start of the game, and immediately Jones came into the limelight with a nice piece of heading which, however, brought no result. The United replied on the right flank, Bryant with a long centre causing Sagar to make a catch. Sagar had more work to do than Breedon, but it was not the sort to cause a him any great trouble, although Rowley a most caught him napping when a centre bumped against the angle of the woodwork, Sagar had undoubtedly judged the ball to be going over. Boyes made a brilliant run down the Everton left wing, finishing with a centre which almost asked to be converted, but a United man stepped in and gave away a corner. Lawton with a brilliant burst of speed broke through the United defence and appeared to be a certain scorer, but his shot was deflected outside the post. At fifteen minutes Manchester were awarded a penalty, and they scored through Whalley, who shot high into the net. Everton almost equalised in the next minute, Breedon just fingering a shot outside his goal.

EVERTON DRAW
February 17, 1941. The Liverpool Daily Post
Manchester United 2, Everton 2
Keen Tackling Curbs Forwards.
By Stork.
Everton did remarkably well at Old Trafford to hold Manchester United to a 2-2 draw in the first leg of their League Cup-tie. It is uncommon these days for clubs to field teams fully representative of the club, but Everton and the United relied purely on their own staffs. In the first half the United by more tenacious football, seemed to have the measure of Everton, who for some reason are slow starters these days. One of the reason why Manchester held the whip hand for so long was that their keen tackling prevented the Everton machine from getting into smooth working order. Whereas Everton were prepared to wait for the ball the United went out to seek it and by their grim tenacity usually took possession.
Whalley’s Penalty
It was not, however, until they were awarded a penalty, in fifteen minutes that they obtained their first goal. Whalley converting the spot kick. But in all fairness to the United, it must be stated that had not Sagar been in his most adamant form, Manchester would have taken an even bigger lead. Sagar made superlative saves when all seemed lost, and when within three minutes from the interval Lawton pounced upon a long pass from the rear, outpaced Porter, and then steered the ball well clear of Breedon, Everton came into the game with quite rosy prospects. The football had all along been enthusiastic with the United showing cup-tie tactics, which really pleased the 6,000 onlookers. They were entirely different to Everton in that they went straight to their objectives, cutting out all frills and fancies, yet it was Everton who took the next goal. Lawton, out passing Porter once again, strode forward, lured Breedon from his net, then placed the ball into the goal.
Slip by Greenhalgh
This was in 50 minutes, but two minutes later, Manchester were on terms. Greenhalgh took the ball on his chest, knocked it down and made his clearance, but instead of getting the ball away, he sliced it to Rowley, who crashed the ball into the net. Both keepers had plenty to do before the end. With home advantage next Saturday, Everton should win through to the next round. Manchester United:- Breedon, goal; Redwood, Roughton, backs; Warner, Porter, and Whalley, half-backs; Bryant, Carey, Smith, Asquith, and Rowley, forwards. Everton: - Sagar (captain), goal; Cook and Greenhalgh, backs; Mercer, Jones and Watson, half-backs; Arthur, Bentham, Lawton, Stevenson and Boyes, forwards. Referee; Mr. G. Twist (Westhoughton).

OLD TRAFFORD TUSSLE.
February 17, 1941. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Notes.
Both Everton and Manchester United gave a brilliant display at Old Trafford, and they kept up a hot pace for the full 90 minutes. Sagar’s fine goalkeeping and a couple of first-class goals by Lawton were highlights of the Everton display. Boyes and Stevenson were the visitors’ best wing, although they faced Manchester United’s bets half-back in Warner. Jones kept a tight grip on the Manchester leader, but Lawton’s speed gave Porter, the home pivot, a lot of trouble.

A GRAND GAME.
February 17, 1941. The Liverpool Echo.
By Stork.
By their draw at Old Trafford, Everton have practically made certain of entry to the second round of the League Cup, for no matter which way you view the match game on Saturday now an Everton victory seems assured. My reason for confidence is that while Manchester United gave Everton many anxious moments in their game at Old Trafford, they only scored two goals through a penalty kick and a slip by Greenhalgh’s whereas Everton goals were made in a more confident manner. The United were undoubtedly on their toes, and for quite a time they sounded the depths of the Everton club, which has fallen into the habit these past few weeks of starting slowly. They never really got going in this game due to Manchester’s knite like tackling and determination to seek the ball and not wait its arrival. They were not concerned with finery. Get the ball into the Everton goalmouth by the shortest possible route, and when there they banged in some grand shots which Sagar dealt with in his ablest style. He made splendid saves, and was only beaten by a penalty goal, and later when Greenhalgh erred. Everton could have won this game hands down, had they been more observant. They should have seen that Lawton could outpace Porter, and that a ball through the middle was worth half a dozen to the wing. Lawton scored two goals through his quickness down the middle, for he had Porter on his tail helpless and beaten, but they did not push enough through balls to Lawton. Manchester fought back, and provided a thrilling finish. Greenhalgh makes so few mistakes that when he does it seems all the more glaring, but I am sure he will never forgive himself for this one he made which enabled Rowley to slap in an unstoppable shot.

EVERTON CHANGES
February 18, 1941. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log.
Everton will open out as favourities for their tie with Manchester United at Goodison Park. They have revealed themselves as the better side, having twice drawn at Old Trafford –the score on each occasion was 2-2 –while they won the league game at Goodison Park 5-2. The Blues will probably make two changes as compared with the team which drew at Manchester last Saturday. Jackie Jones, the erstwhile full back, comes back to right half in place of Watson, Jones played in this position recently when helping the champions to win at Anfield. Arthur is in the Army, and it is doubtful whether he will be able to play. This will give Harry Catterick, the Stockport lad who has helped himself to so many goals from the centre forward position, his chance to occupy the extreme right position as partner to Bentham. Catterick played in this position several times last season and with success. This term he has made rapid strides and stands out as a really good proposition. This is a source of extreme gratification to Charlie Gee, the Everton international pivot, whose sound recommendation had a lot to do with Everton signing on Catterick a couple of seasons ago. For the rest, Everton will have out their championship winners, and that combination should be good enough to settle the hopes of the United. Everton; Sagar; Cook, Greenhalgh; Mercer, Jones (Tom), Jones (Jack); Catterick, Bentham, Lawton, Stevenson, Boyes.
• New Brighton will have Everton’s Hill at left full back this week-end.

EVERTON’S ONE CHANGE
February 18, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
Ranger’s Notes
Everton make one change in their side to meet Manchester United, at Goodison, on Saturday, in the return first-round Cup-tie. Watson has been having trouble lately with an ankle injury received some months age, and through he played last week at Old Trafford it failed to stand the strain satisfactorily, so that Jones (J.E) comes in again at left half. Sagar; Cook, Greenhalgh; Jones (TG), Jones (JE); Catterick, Bentham, Lawton, Stevenson, Boyes. It is all to the good that both sides should start level in the second encounter. A start for either would have robbed the game of some of its attraction. As it is, it boils down to the old pre-war “death of glory” business, with everything depending on the one day’s effort. The Old Trafford game was a gem. This one promises to be just as good, perhaps better.

SECOND CUP VISIT
February 21, 1941. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Express.
It will be Manchester United’s second visit to Goodison Park on senior cup business. It is curious that during all the years that the Blues and United have been first class clubs the United should have been called on to make only one visit to Goodison in the F.A. Cup. That was in 1903, when Everton scored a clear victory by three goals to nil, I have a firm conviction that the United will be sent empty away tomorrow. Last Saturday the clubs drew 2-2 at Old Trafford. In these days of “guest” players it is noteworthy that the 22 players who will be on parade at Goodison only one will be a “guest” player. This is Bryant, the United outside right. Even he was a regular United first team player before being transferred to Brentford just before the war. Everton have to make two changes compared with last Saturday’s side, Jack Jones appearing at left half for Gordon Watson, who has a slight injury, and Catterick will be at outside right for Arthur. The United field the same team, which means that Porter, who has had a long and distinguished career at Old Trafford will once again oppose Lawton. This should prove a really excellent game and Everton should have their best attendance of the season. When the clubs met at Goodison in the League Everton won 5-2, and I expect them to win just as convincingly tomorrow. Everton; Sagar; Cook, Greenhalgh; Mercer, Jones (TG), Jones (Jack); Catterick, Bentham, Lawton, Stevenson, Boyes. Manchester United; Breedon; Redwood, Roughton; Warner, Porter, Whalley; Bryant, Carey, Smith, Asquith, Rowley.

EVERTON’S ADVANTAGE
February 21, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
Ranger’s Notes.
Everton start the second leg in their game with Manchester United with the advantage not only of being at home, but knowing that they were good enough to hold the Mancunians to a draw at Old Trafford. And they might have turned the draw, into a win had the forwards provided Lawton with more chances against a centre half who could not hold him. Lawton latterly has got back to his brightest and best form; his colleagues must make the most of that fact by putting the ball to him as often as possible. Manchester United will field the same team as at Old Trafford, which means that Porter will again have the task of coping with Lawton. The pointer is obvious. Everton will be without Watson, due to ankle trouble, but Jones (J.E) is a capable deputy, while Catterick in place of Arthur at outside right will not weaken the attack. Everton’s defence ought to be strong enough to keep a tight hold on the visiting forwards, and if the forwards come up to recent standard the Blues should be in the second round draw on Saturday night. Everton; Sagar; Cook, Greenhalgh; Mercer, Jones (TG), Jones (Jack); Catterick, Bentham, Lawton, Stevenson, Boyes. Manchester United; Breedon; Redwood, Roughton; Warner, Porter, Whalley; Bryant, Carey, Smith, Asquith, Rowley.

EVERTON HALF-BACK GRIP
February 22, 1941. The Evening Express
By Pilot.
Everton had to make two late changes for their football league war first round tie against Manchester United, at Goodison Park, today, Lyon and Wyles were called on to form the left wing, owing to the absence of Stevenson, and Boyes. The clubs drew 2-2 at Old Trafford last week. Everton: - Sagar (captain), goal; Cook and Greenhalgh, backs; Mercer, Jones (T), and Jones (jack), half-backs; Catterick, Bentham, Lawton, Lyon and Wyles, forwards. Manchester United:- Breedon, goal; Redwood and Roughton, backs; Warner, Porter and Whalley, half-backs; Bryant (Brentford), Carey, Smith, Asquith, and Rowley, forwards. Referee; Mr. G. Twist (West Houghton). A mis-kick almost gave the United an early goal, for Rowley was able to go through and make a low square pass to Carey. Carey managed to twist round and steer the ball just inside the post. In his enthusiasm he fouled Jones (T) in the process of making his effort. Catterick, receiving a long cross field pass, cut in enterprisingly, but his fierce cross shot was saved by Breedon at full length. Lyon was prominent with some diligent foraging and Lawton twice gave Porter the “dummy” cleverly, only to find his shots charged down. United forwards were finding it extremely difficult to make headway against the quick interception of the only Everton half-backs. It was only the quick tackling of Cook which deprived Carey’s of a goal, after Rowley’s centre had bothered the defence.
Lawton Thrill
There was a thrill when Lawton broke clean through, and from the edge of the goal area cracked in a terrific shot which Breedon turned over the top in brilliant style. Lawton then placed into the net, but the whistle had already gone for offside. Lyon repeatedly demonstrated his steady improvement, his use of the ball being exceptionally well considered. Lyon, by the way, will be 17 tomorrow. Catterick survived a foul and a tackle before bringing Breedon to full length, and Lawton was a foot wide when perfectly position. It was only on rare occasions that one saw anything menacing from the United attack, but Breedon was generally kept on the alert and he had to be quick to pull down a sharp shot from Bentham. He was also there to push away Catterick’s effort Lawton had created the perfect opening. It was left to Asquith to bring Sagar into action, and after Sagar had made a neat catch from his mark, he had to go full length to push aside a shot from Smith. The 2,000 odd spectators were finding plenty over which to enthuse, but Everton were the more convincing combination.

HAMMERING UNITED
February 22, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
Everton After A Goal
Todays’s Cup-ties
By Stork.
Everton:- Sagar, goal; Cook (captain) and Greenhalgh, backs; Mercer, Jones (T), and Jones (jack), half-backs; Catterick, Bentham, Lawton, Lyon and Wyles, forwards. Manchester United:- Breedon, goal; Redwood and Roughton, backs; Warner, Porter and Whalley, half-backs; Bryant (Brentford), Carey, Smith, Asquith, and Rowley, forwards. Referee; Mr. G. Twist (West Houghton). There was quite a good attendance for the return Cup game at Goodison Park and the folk saw Manchester United, open up in sprightly manner. They netted the ball within 30 seconds of the opening, but Smith’s shot was not allowed to count, for just previously there had been a foul on Jones. The United persisted in their aggression, and Smith always willing to try his luck, was nearly through again until he reached the Rock of Gibraltar Jones, whom he found barring his way. Everton right wing worked its way through, and Catterick, closing in and taking a great deal of care over his shot, slammed the ball straight at goalkeeper Breedon, who could not hold it, but did the next best thing –got rid of it, and was able to recover and repeat the save. The football was as keen as any Cup-tie of normal times. Both goals had escapes and each side was playing excellently. Bryant put over one centre which almost called for conversion, but Jones got there first and so the danger was not a danger at all.
Everton Hammering
Mercer opened the way for an Everton attack and Lawton made a pile-driving shot which was cannoned out. This left Lyon with a “possible” but the inside man screwed the ball wide. A much better effort came when Lawton aimed a blow at the United goal with one of his cannon-ball specials, and Breedon averted the situation with a sterling save. Everton were hammering the United defence, and Lawton tested the alertness of Breedon when he tried a tricky overhead kick, which was dead on the mark. But so was the goalkeeper J.E. Jones once pulled Everton out of a difficulty, when the United’s attack was closing down on the Everton goal. Catterick showed fine form on the wing his burst of speed proving a great trouble to the United defenders, but the man who was the real source of danger was Lawton. He was shooting with amazing power and accuracy. For a time the United did nothing but defend against a set of forwards who were bang on their toes. Lyon forced Breedon to a grand save, and then Lawton netted, but just prior to that a corner kick had been given, so that goal was of no account.

EVERTON’S SUCCESS
February 24, 1941. The Liverpool Daily Post
Everton 2, Manchester United 1
Hard Test at Goodison
By Stork.
After holding Manchester United to a draw in the first “leg” of the League cup at Old Trafford a week ago, it was only natural that Everton expected to win their way through the next round without unduly stressing themselves in the return at Goodison Park. Instead of an easy victory, however, Everton had to fight desperately hard to won through 2-1 and so qualify to meet Southport in the second round. Manchester United held the lead for well over the hour and were playing with such confidence that they seemed capable of holding on to their solitary goal to the end, for Everton were not working smoothly as a team. This may have been due to the inclusion of two junior players, who did very well, with out, however, touching the standards of their seniors, Stevenson and Boyes. I have seen many worse cup ties in more normal times than this one. There was plenty of good football in it, any amount of keenness and plenty of goal incidents. What could one wish for more? Manchester opened with a sprightliness which promised well, but Everton hit back in such a manner and had they taken a goal or two and they would have done so had it not been for the grand work of Breedon in the United goal, Everton might have won rather easily.
Lawton Shots.
Lawton banged in several great drives which the United goalkeeper ably dealt with, and the Everton defence was well able to deal with the Manchester attack, which also had its near squeaks. Smith actually netted in the first half minute, but the goal was negatived because of a previous foul. There was another occasion when Everton put the ball into the United net, and here again a prior infringement ruled the goal out. It was a case of Greek meeting Greek for long spells, but I should say that Breedon had by far the more work to do in the first 45 minutes. He made superlative saves from Catterick. Lyon, and Lawton, Rowley scored for the United at 42 minutes. Rowley’s goal was beautifully taken, but he was fortunate to get the opportunity to shoot, for it was from a Sagar clearance. He pushed the ball straight out to the feet of Rowley, who instantly cracked it back into the net. Thus the favourites were in arrears at the half-stage. In the second half Manchester seemed likely to increase their lead. There was not the usual combination in the Everton play, so that the defence had much more to do than is usually the case. Time was rolling on and Everton’s chances were becoming slender. It was then decided to change Everton’s forward formation.
A Successful Change.
Lyon went to outside right and Catterick took his place at inside left, and that seemed to bring more powerful in the attack and at 75 minutes Catterick accepted a Lawton header and swept through the opposition to score an equalising goal. Lawton himself could not get in those felling shots of his due to the quick tackling of Porter, but he did the next best thing, he offered Mercer a beautiful pass, and the international half-back swept forward, took a shot without hesitation and Everton were in the lead –and they remained so to the end. Smith should have equalised in the last few minutes, for he had a great opportunity when he was right through the Everton defence but he shot wide. Everton: - Sagar, (captain) goal; Cook and Greenhalgh, backs; Mercer, Jones (T), and Jones (jack), half-backs; Catterick, Bentham, Lawton, Lyon and Wyles, forwards. Manchester United:- Breedon, goal; Redwood and Roughton, backs; Warner, Porter and Whalley, half-backs; Bryant (Brentford), Carey, Smith, Asquith, and Rowley, forwards. Referee; Mr. G. Twist (West Houghton).

A REAL CUP TIE.
February 24, 1941. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log
The match between Everton and Manchester United at Goodison Park, giving the Blues a 4-3 winning aggregate was, in every respect a real cup-tie embracing all the old pre-war thrills and enthusiasm. Incidentally, it was watched by the biggest attendance seen in Merseyside this season -6,598to be exact. This exceeded that for the Liverpool-Preston North end game earlier in the season. As Mr. Harold Hardman, the United director and former Everton outside-left, said to me after the game, “If we could see matches like this every week the people would come rolling back to support the game. How true. Mr. Will Gibbons, the Everton chairman was quick to endorse the comment. He described it as a grand sporting game between tip-top teams and never a fouled action.” And the enthusiasm of the crowd had not a little to do with Everton winning rally. The United had scored just before the interval through Rowley –a quick, cross-shot after Sagar had edged the ball away. In the second half the United defence consolidated in determined style, half-backs and backs tackling with rare tenacity and refusing to be drawn out of position. Everton were finding it tough going. Then skipper Ted Sagar, brought Catterick to inside left. It made for greater weight in support of Lawton. Immediately Catterick equalised from close range, and four minutes later Lawton drew the defence out of position and made the perfect side-pass for Mercer to race through and win the Blues the game a glorious goal this. Even if Everton win the Cup they will not have a much harder game than this. Yet they were always the more methodical side, and with more steadiness in front of goal would have avoided later heart throbs, Lawton had two goals disallowed, while the United lost a Carey goal owing to a infringement. The Everton half-backs, despite the rather unorthodox work of Jack Jones kept a tight grip on the United attack, and behind the defence of Cook, Greenhalgh and Sagar was rocklike. Lawton and 17 year-old Johnny Lyon were the pick of an attack which licked balance. Lyon was excellent in the first half, but found the pace beating him later on. This is a player with a great future. Yes, a defectable game splendidly handled by Mr. George Twist of West Houghton. And it was a treat once again to renew acquaintance with so many old soccer friends.

EVERTON’S NARROW SQUEAK
February 24, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
Ranger’s Notes
For a time against Manchester United it looked as though Everton were going out in round one, for United playing grand football, gave the Blues a Roland for every Oliver, and held an interval lead through a goal by Rowley, Everton missing Stevenson and Boyes were lopsided in attack, and Lawton, who played splendidly considering he hardly ever got a decent pass, found Breedon an insurable barrier. Actually Lawton was responsible for both Everton’s goals, the first by Catterick from Lawton’s neatly placed header and the scored by Mercer from an equally well-placed return pass, Mercer himself having started the movement. Everton won by reason of their strong rally midway through a second half, when for fifteen minutes they ran United off their feet. The visitors, desperately striving to stage a come-back were within an ace of forcing extra time, but the immaculate imperturbable Jones well supported by the backs and Sagar withstood the pressure so that next week Goodison followers have the opportunity of meeting Everton set out to avenge the dismissal of Liverpool, the luck of the draw –and its geographical grouping –bringing Southport to the city again. Everton’s improvement started from the time they switched Catterick from outside right to inside left, where Lyon had been disappointing. He helped to balance the previously one-sided attack, a pointer which doubtless will be borne in mind should Stevenson be absent again. Recently I passed the opinion that inside forward was Catterick’s best position. That view has now been amply confirmed.

BLUES’ CUP TEAM
February 25, 1941. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log
Everton have strong hopes of securing the help of Alex Stevenson and Wally Boyes for their Football league Cup second round tie against Southport at Goodison Park on Saturday. Neither of these international could secure leave to appear against Manchester United last Saturday, and Lyon and Wyles deputised. Apart from these changes there will be two positional changes. These effect the right wing, where Catterick moves to inside and Bentham goes on the wing. There is no disputing the fact that Catterick is much more effective in an inside position than on the wing. He proved this on Saturday. Jack Jones will continued at left half in place of Watson, who is still nursing an ankle injury. Everton; Sagar; Cook, Greenhalgh; Mercer, Jones (Tom), Jones (Jack); Bentham, Catterick, Lawton, Stevenson, Boyes.

EVERTON’S CHANGES
February 25, 1941. The Liverpool Echo.
Ranger’s Notes
Everton hope to a have a stronger side out for the meeting with Southport, at Goodison Park than they had against Manchester United. Stevenson and Boyes are expected to make up the left wing, while up the right Bentham goes outside and Catterick takes over at inside. The defence is unchanged. Teams; Sagar; Cook, Greenhalgh; Mercer, Jones (TG), Jones (JE); Bentham, Catterick, Lawton, Stevenson, and Boyes.

CUP GAME TOMORROW
Februay 28, 1941. The Evening Express
By the Pilot.
Everton tackle the conquerors of Liverpool, Southport at Goodison Park. Everton must stand out as the new cup favourities, following the elimination of the former favourities, Blackpool by Manchester City.
Ended Cup Run
Southport in visiting Goodison Park, return to a ground which saw the end of their great run of cup successes in season 1930-31. They had accounted for Millwall, Blackpool and Bradford on the trot. Then they came to face Everton who, at that time were “walking” the second Division Championship. Everton piled on seven points in the first half without reply, and although Archie Waterston bagged one for the Sandergrounders early in the second half, there was no stopping Everton, who eventually won by nine goals to one. Of those eleven players who fell before the might of Everton, that day –February 28, 1931 –one will be on duty tomorrow. This is Jack Little, the right back who 10 years ago formed a strong unit in that defensive barrier of Baker, Little and Robinson with Vincent at centre-half. Since than Little have had a spell with my home town team, Exeter City. He is still on Exeter’s books, but now plays on loan with Southport. The next time Southport went to Goodison on first class cup business was in 1936 when, after playing two drawn games with New Brighton in the F.A. Cup went down 2-1. Maybe the third time will be lucky for Southport? Everton with nine of their championship side on duty, should prove too good for a Southport lacking some of their leading “guest” players. Everton must bear in mind that Southport were expected to be beaten by Liverpool at Anfield, but they dumbfounded everyone by winning 3-2 and then holding the Reds to a 2-2 draw at Haig-Avenue. Everton have already defeated Southport twice in League games -1-0 at Haig-Avenue and 2-1 at Goodison –and I think they will secure a margin tomorrow to ensure further progress. Teams; Sagar; Cook, Greenhalgh; Mercer, Jones (TG), Jones (JE); Bentham, Catterick, Lawton, Stevenson, and Boyes. Southport (from); Jones; Little, Grainger (j); Bradford, Harrison, Newcomb; Grainger (D), Johnson, Curran, Harker, Ottewell, Sandersson, Howard.

SOUTHPORT AT EVERTON
February 28, 1941. The Liverpool Echo
Ranger’s Notes
After Liverpool, Everton. As that was Southport’s actual experience in the War Cup draw, there will
Be people from along the sandhills who will go to Goodison Park tomorrow with a belief that advance can also happen on the field of play. This is the first leg of the tie, and Southport will be well content to are only a goal or two in it between themselves and Everton before the Haig-Avenue decider. A 9-1 defeat circumatation some years ago is no real criterion which to prejudge a War Cup-tie result. But team changes radically and quick these days. Everton hope to be strongest than ever with Stevenson and Boyes on the left again, which Southport are to be without Meek and Hullet, who played well at Anfield and paved the way to success in the second leg. The team will not be chosen until just before the game, and may include S. Ottewell of Chesterfield, in the forwards. Teams; Sagar; Cook, Greenhalgh; Mercer, Jones (TG), Jones (JE); Bentham, Catterick, Lawton, Stevenson, and Boyes. Southport (from); Jones; Little, Grainger (j); Bradford, Harrison, Newcomb; Grainger (D), Johnson, Curran, Harker, Ottewell, Sandersson, Howard.

 

 

February 1941