Everton Independent Research Data

 

EVERTON
(Draw 22 last season)
January 1 1913. Evening Express Liverpool
‘Spurs at Goodison
Lively End to Tame Game
Blues Beaten in Closing Stages
Three Goals in Quick Succession
By Cosmo
Tottenham Hotspur, like Everton, have shown big improvement of late, and the meeting at Goodison Park this afternoon was expected to produce a hard game. For Everton Davidson took the place of Uren, who injured his ankle at Blackpool, while there were to changes in the Tottenham team, Bliss taking the place of Steel at inside left, and Dareell going right half back in place of Weir. Everton: - Caldwell, goal Stevenson and Macconnachie (captain), backs Harris, Wareing, and Grenyer, half-backs Beare, Jefferis, Fleetwood, Bradshaw, and Davidson, forwards. Tottenham Hotspur: - Joyce, goal, Collins, and Webster, backs, Darnell, Rance, and Grimsdell, half-backs Tattersall, Minter, Cantrell, Bliss, and Middlemiss forwards. Referee Mr. A. Wilkes.

Holiday Crowd.
There were well over 20,000 spectators present at the start. The ground was in excellent condition and the game opened at a smart pace. The first incident f note was tricky work between Beare and Jefferis, the ball being swung out to Davidson, who was pulled up before, he could centre. Everton were next awarded a corner kick. Rance getting the ball away with his head. A lofty kick by MaConnachie led to Fleetwood making a spirited dash, but he was forced off the ball. An exciting scrimmage took place in the mouth of the ‘Spurs goal following a corner kick, Grenyer eventually shooting wide. Another spirited attack by the homesters caused the custodian to rush out to field a hot shot from Bradshaw, and another scrimmage followed, but no goal was forthcoming, Bradshaw was again prominent, but his strong shot was diverted over the bar at the expense of a corner.

Only Nearly.
So far the Spurs forwards had not been allowed to get within shooting range, while on the other hand, Everton had several times came near to scoring. Then the visitors had a spell of attacking and Caldwell allowed the ball to slip through his hands when outside his goal. A free kick followed, and Darnell got in an oblique shot, which the Everton keeper saved. After Webster had almost put through his own goal Beare netted the ball, but the referee had previously blown his whistle for offside. Then followed some tame play, but some excitement was caused when from a pass by Bradshaw, Fleetwood cleverly wheeled round Collins and dashed for goal. He had only the keeper to beat, but to the astonishment of all he swung the ball across the goal, both Jeffeis and Beare being too far forward to render any assistance. Everton continued to monopolize matters, but the forwards were showing a lack of penetrative skill. Bradshaw made one valiant attempt to get the ball through but his shot was diverted, and another abortive corner kick followed. A breakaway to the other end led to Tattersall being given

A Good Opening.
He sent in a strong shot, which Caldwell saved at the expense of a corner. The home keeper was showing a proneness to fumble with the ball, and this fault had led to two corner kicks being awarded the visitors. Fortunately for Everton nothing tangible occurred. The first really strong shot came from Wareing, but Joyce refused to be beaten. A stoppage followed through Fleetwood being injured, but happily he was able to resume. Following a nicely placed corner kick by Davidson, Bradshaw put the ball through put the point was disallowed for offside. Then the visitors swept down on the home goal, and a free kick led to Rance sending in a long shot, which Caldwell saved. Just before the interval Fleetwood and Rance got at loggerheads, and the referee had to interfere. Minter sent in a strong shot after a spirited rush by the ‘Spurs' inside men Caldwell again saving. The first half had produced very little good football. Everton had the lion's share of the attack, but their work in front of goal was very scrappy. On the other end, Tottenham through rarely dangerous had given Caldwell some hot shots to stops.

Half-time Everton 0 Tottenham 0
Second Half.
Everton opened the second half with a series of attacks, but their front of goal play was very disappointing. Then the ‘Spurs' got going, and receiving from Bliss, Cantrell sent in a low shot, which Caldwell saved. The spectators now introduced the cry of “Play Up the Blues” but no immediate improvement was forthcoming. The Everton forwards again swept down on the Totenham goal, but the goal seemed as far off as ever. Fleetwood had only the keeper to beat, sending high over the bar. The Tottenham goal then had a lucky escape. Jefferis after clever footwork, placed over to Beare, who dashed in and shot strongly Joyce turning the ball over the bar with the tips of his fingers. Play remained in the Tottenham goal area, and from a fine centre by Davidson, Fleetwood looked a certain scorer, but his own ground shot was kept out by Joyce. The 1Spurs' kept on trying, but like Everton were most unhappy in their attempts to score. Tattersall had one good opening, only to shoot wide, while on the other wing a shot by Middlemiss shared a similar fate.

Perseverance Reward.
Twenty minutes from the end the homesters succeeded in scoring. A forward pass by Harris led to a determined rush on the ‘Spurs' goal, Bradshaw making no mistake in scoring. The homesters joy was shortlivened, however, for a minute later a mistake by Davidson let in Cantrell. The latter's shot was stopped by Caldwell, but meeting the rebound Minter drove into the net. This put new life into the game, and the Everton forwards were seen to better advantage than in the opening stages. The visitors also livened up. Following neat work by Bliss and Middlemiss, the ball drifted over the right, Minter rushing in and scoring a second time. Final result Everton 1 Tottenham 2.

EVERTON 1 TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR 2
January 2, 1913. The Liverpool Courier.
EVERTON'S RELAPSE
POOR GAME AT GOODISON.
The game at Goodison Park was most disappointing, both Everton and Tottenham failing far short of the improved form they have shown of late. There was no lack of interest in the game, but the 30,000 spectators present had not much cause for enthusiasm, for it was not until the closing stages that any real thrills were provided. The Everton players had certainly only themselves to blame for defeat. On the game as a whole they had much the best of the argument, and no end of chances were missed, especially in the first half. Time after time openings were created to be lost through sheer impotence in front of goal. A good deal of cleverness was shown in the open, but when in front of goal there was a sheer lack of penetrative skill. Had Browell led the home attack instead of Fleetwood the result would probably have been much different. The one particular weak spot in the Everton team was at centre forward, for Fleetwood was far from effective. He was slow and erractic, and he missed several easy chances of scoring. Tottenham were never more than moderate, but they kept on trying, and in the end they profited by two mistakes made by the home backs.

EVERTON'S MISSED CHANCES.
The game opened very tamely, and for the first half hour Everton monopolised matters, but could do anything but scores. Many good openings were created, but from once cause or another no goal was forthcoming. There was a good deal of bungling in front of goal, and an entire absence of strong accurate shooting. Everton did net the ball twice, but in each instance they were offside. The Spurs were not often dangerous, but their occasional breakaway were always dangerous, and Caldwell had two hot shots to save from Tattersall and Minter. Everton also had the lion's share of the attack in the second half, but they continued to be weak in front of goal. Beare got in one grand shot which Joyce turned over the bar with the tips of his fingers, and Fleetwood was given a good opening only to place straight into the hands of the keeper, who had no difficulty in saving. The opening goal by Everton came twenty minutes from the end, when a forward pass by Harris led to a determined rush, Bradhsaw scoring with a low shot. The “Spurs” equalising goal was the result of a mistake by Macconnachie, who let in Cantrell. The latter's shot was fisted out by Caldwell, but Minter met the rebound and scored. After this Tottenham redoubled their efforts, and a faulty tackle by Stevenson gave Middlemiss his opportunity for placing over to the right, Minter again rushing up, and scoring.

FORWARDS OFF COLOUR.
Apart from the two costly mistakes made towards the end, the Everton backs had proved most reliable. No fault could be found with the halves. Wareing again giving a good account of himself at centre half . The prime weakness was in attack, and the deficiency in regard to shooting was not confined to Fleetwood, both Jefferis and Bradshaw showing the same weakness. Beare was only moderate, and Davidson who took the place of Uren at outside left, was lacking in resource. For Tottenham, Minter was the best of a moderate line of Tottenham. Rance, and Darnell were the pick of the halves, and Webster and Collins, at full back, appeared more formidable then they really were. Teams: - Everton: - Caldwell, goal Stevenson and Macconnachie (Captain), backs Harris, Wareing, and Grenyer, half-backs Beare, Jefferis, Fleetwood, Bradshaw, and Davidson, forwards. Tottenham Hotspur: - Joyce, goal, Collins, and Webster, backs, Darnell, Rance, and Grimsdell, half-backs Tattersale, Minter, Cantrell, Bliss, and Middlemiss forwards. Referee Mr. A. Wilkes.

BLACKBURN ROVERS RESERVES 1 EVERTON RESERVES 6
January 2, 1913. The Liverpool Courier.
CENTRAL LEAGUE
THE Rovers, who had a weak team, were badly beaten, Gault opened the scoring for Everton, and after Page had put through his own goal, Simms and Gault (2) added to the visitors' total before the interval, after which a further couple of goals were recorded. Final Blackburn Rovers 1 Everton 6.

EVERTON'S FAILURES
January 2, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool
A New Right Wing Against Notts.
By the Critic.
The holiday games continued to provide surprises, and I fancy players will not be sorry when affairs settle to the ordinary weekly fixture. Many of the men showed signs of the heavy strain in yesterday's games and some of the results were rather surprising. It was the biggest surprise of all, however, to see Everton beaten at home by a lowly ‘Spurs, and it is worth noting too, that the “Blues” were the only club to fall on their own ground. The start for the New Year was by no means encouraging and the 30,000 spectators who witnessed the game must have been greatly disappointed with the fare. It was a moderate contest throughout if it was only for the fact that Everton were almost continually in the ‘Spurs half of the field. There's the rub The “Blues” had far more of the play than their opponents, yet there were beaten. The fact was that the forwards were too slow for anything and chances galore were missed through sheer lack of finishing power. It is not suprising that changes have been made for the Notts County match on Saturday, a new right wing being tried.

New Right Wing.
Brannick, the Atherton, youth, who did so well at Blackburn, comes in at inside right, and he is to be partnered by Chedgzoy, the Ellesmere Port youth, who has waited long for an opportunity in the League team, and the pair may infuse much needed dash to the attack. It is suprising however, to had that Fleetwood is chosen for the centre position, when Browell is available, for the Rochdale youth did not appear fit yesterday. I note, however, that Browell is to do duty for the Reserves against Rochdale at Goodison Park. With the exception of Brannick and Chedgzoy the League eleven will be the same as that which did duty yesterday.

Why Everton Failed.
Had the home forwards been up to concert pitch they must have won handsomely, for in the first half especially it was a case of Everton first and the rest nowhere, so well did the halves anticipate the Spurs forward moves, but the home qunitette could do nothing right near goal. True the “Blues” had what appeared from the press box good goals disallowed, and this may have taken some of the heart out of them. Beare's point appeared to be good enough, for the ball came off one of the backs, but a friend who was behind the goal assures me that both Beare and Bradshaw were offside when they netted. Throughout the game, however, the decisions of the referee, Mr. Wilkes, the Old Aston Villa half back, were by no means popular, and there, were times when it was difficult to gather for what infringement the whistle sounded to the onlookers there were certainly some strange rulings, and from the stands I certainly thought the referee made more than one mistake. However, the main point is that Everton did not show to advantage, and that the ‘Spurs, if it was only for their pluck and determination, and the fact that they took their chances, deserved to win. The form of the “Blues” forward line was poor in the extreme, and the sixth home defeat of the season must be laid at their door. The halves and backs played with marked precision up to the last fifteen minutes, and then they seemed to waver before the rushes of the ‘Spurs. Still I should not like to lay the blame on the backs. The improvement in the play of Wareing and Grenyer was very noticeable, but though his work is artistic, I fancy Wareing is inclined to overdo the dribbling part of the business. But this is but a slight fault, which can be easily remedied. Grenyer in the first half played wonderfully good football as also did Harris, but they were not so prominent after the interval.

A moderate Forward Line.
Stevenson and MaConnachie kicked and tackled finely up to the point when the ‘Spurs scored their initial goal, and Caldwell while making some good saves was very uncertain at times. There was not one of the forwards who played on convincing style, although Bradshaw put in some good work. Jefferis is evidentially not himself, and Beare too, is out of form. Fleetwood was eclipsed by Rance, who stuck to him like glue, and at one time the pair looked like coming to blows, and the referee administrated a caution. Fleetwood had his chances, but he was not quick enough to signal himself of the openings presented. Uren injured his ankle in the morning on the sand at Blackpool, and Davidson, who deputised, was not aggressive. Joyce in the ‘Spurs' goal, did some good work, and he was ably supported by the backs. Rance and Grimsdell were rear tacklers, and Middlemiss and Minter were good forwards.

EVERTON'S NEW RIGHT WING
January 4 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool
By the Critic.
An interesting experiment is being made by Everton in their match with Notts County at Notts. Beare and Jefferis are being given a rest, and the right wing will consist of Chedgzy and Brannick. Both of these players are well deserving of a trail in the league team, and Brannick had the distinction of scoring the winning goal at Blackburn on his first appearance in first class company. It has been decided to give Browell a preliminary canter with the Reserves team, and this means that Fleetwood will again lead the Everton attack this afternoon. Notts County are not a great team, but, still, the Everton forwards will have to give a more incisive display than on Wednesday if victory is to be assured

EVERTON
(Blues won 1-0 last season)
January 4, 1913. Evening express Liverpool
“Blues” visit Nottingham.
Reappearance of Tom Browell.
Brannick's Great Goal.
Brings Full Points to Blues.
By Cosmo
The Everton team left their training quarters at Blackpool early this morning and arrived at Nottingham shortly after noon. Owing to unitiness there were several changes from the side originally selected and Fleetwood's knee was not sound the occasion served for the reappearance of Browell. Then Uren injured his foot while at training quarters and gave place to Davidson, and with a new right wing Chedgzoy and Brannick there was much speculation as to how the line would fare with Notts, who are expected, after their recent failures to make a big effort. The weather in Nottingham was altogether unfavourable for the pursuit of outdoors sport for rain had fallen all the morning and there was little prospect of a stoppage. Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (captain), backs Harris, Wareing, and Grenyer, half-backs, Chedgzoy, Brannick, Browell, Brawshaw, and Davidson, forwards. Notts County: - Iremonger, goal, Morley, and West, backs, Flint, Clamp, and Allsebrook, half-backs, Hooper Williams, Henshall, Jones, and Waterall, forwards. Referee Mr. W. Chadwick.

It was still raining when the teams turned out, and the ground was in a fearful state. There were barely 4,000 present when Browell opened the play for Everton. The early stages of the game were contested in the home half, where Chedgzoy and Brannick were prominent in a couple of raids on the Notts defence, but West came to the rescue and Clamp supplemented with the result that Henshall led on a spirited attack.

Everton Hard Pressed.
Hooper, on the right took advantage of a smart pass out and centred for Henshall to head in but Stevenson intercepted the centre's shot and kicked powerfully out of the goalmouth. Notts again returned, and following some aggressive play on the left Waterall greatly harassed the Everton keeper, who, slipped, left his charge open to capture. However, MaConnachie stepped across, but cleared none too effectively and it was lucky for Everton that Waterall's effort was also on the feeble side, which enabled Caldwell to clear. For some little time the Everton defenders were subjected to heavy pressure, but the situation was eventually relieved by Harris, who dribbled out of danger, only to find his final pass on the left go astray.

Wareing Clever.
At length the Blues get under way and following some smart touches by Wareing, Davidson sped along the wing and parted to Browell. The latter, however, failed to get of the mark. However, the Everton forwards thoroughly control the ball, which flew wide of the mark. However, forwards for some time held a grip upon the game, but they found in Morley and West two very capable defenders. One onslaught looked like bringing about a tangible point when Davidson went around Morley and sent in a fine swinging pass in front of goal to Brannick. The latter took the pass, and drove hard in, but the greasy ball left him out of his reckoning though only by inches. This was a narrow escape and led up to a further attack on the home goal, but, as before, the forwards were heavily handicapped owing to the difficulty of getting a firm foothold when a final effort was required.

Browell Made a Rare Attempt.
To head through from another fine centre by Davidson. Next came a great rush to the other end, in which the whole of the home forwards took part. Waterall however, ran the ball over the line, and thereby lost a very good opening. Then followed a dashing movement by the forwards, led on by Browell. The Everton centre under difficulties parted with the ball to Brannick, who pass West and sent in a fast rising ball that evidently, beat Iremonger. This success after play had been twenty minutes in progress and the game had no sooner been resumed than Henshall had an opportunity to equalise. However, he was just a trifle late and Stevenson dashing in cleared in powerful fashion. Again the Notts forwards resumed to the attack, and following some really clever play the ball found its way to Jones, who put in a beauty, which evidently troubled Caldwell, for it was only under difficulties that he got the ball away. The home lot showed great persistency, but following one promising movement.

Waterall Twisted His Knee.
And had perform to retire. Still the line kept pegging away, and Caldwell showed poor judgement in shaping with the ball from Henshall it was a slow shot but the keeper running out dropped the ball and left his charge open for Williams who, however, could do no better than drive the ball against the upright. Waterall them retured, but for some little time the Everton forwards had a strong position. A free kick for fouling Bradshaw just outside the line looked ominous for the home side, but West charged down Grenyer's kick in the mouth of the goal. By long swinging passes the home forwards again became prominent, but they failed to extent much quarter from Stevenson and MaConnachie. On the other had some

Clever Triangular Work
Between Grenyer, Davidson and Bradshaw led up to a great attack on Iremonger's charge. Browell's pass to Brannick however, fell short on the heavy ground and after a clearance by West the keeper came out to prevent the Everton centre getting possession and placing the ball into safe quarters. Browell then forced a corner from which he tested Iremonger with a ball that was saved on the line. Heavy pressure continued on the home line, but there was no further scoring.

Half-time Notts county 0 Everton 1
Browell kept his wings together fairly well, and on the whole made a successful reappearance, while the halves and backs defended in able fashion. On the whole Everton deserved their lead at the interval. Play was very scrappy owing to the terrible state of the ground MaConnachie gave a corner, and from the kick Cramp and Allsbrook miskicked owing to the greasy ball. Notts tried hard to equalise, but Everton retained their lead to the finish. Final result Notts County 0 Everton 1

EVERTON RES V. ROCHDALE.
January 4 1913. Evening Express Liverpool
At Goodison Park. Teams: - Everton: - Bromilow, goal; Page and Holbem, backs; Parker, Browell (captain) and Simpson, half-backs; Smith, Gault, Simms Wright and Johnson, forwards. Rochdale: - Biggar, goal; Barton and Henderson, backs; Chick, Broome, and Birnie, half-backs; Spink, Tully, Cunliffe, MckInlay, and Smith, forwards. Referee Mr. F. Taylor.

Owing to the heavy rain the ground was in a very sudden conditions. From the kick off Rochdale went away and forced two corners in quick succession. From the second flag kick the ball was bobbed about the home goalmouth until McKinlay got his head to the ball and scored after five minutes. The “Blues” then put in a spell of pressure, and they also forced two corners, but both proved abortive. The visitors again got dangerous and Holbem was only just in time to intercept a dangerous centre from Smith, with the Rochdale forward swooping down on the home goal. Clever combined play between Gault and Smith carried the ball to the other end, where Biggar was just in time to incepted a centre from Gault, as Simms was just preparing to shoot Everton sustained the pressure, and eventually their perseverance was rewarded when Gault receiving close to the Rochdale goal put his side on level terms again. From a fine centre by Smith. Tully tried hard to head the ball into the net but Bromilow brought out a very fine clearance, for which he was loudly applauded. A rush to the other end by the Blues enabled Johnson to try his luck, but his shot went past the wrong side of the post. After a spell of even play the homesters put in a dangerous move with culminated in Simms getting in a point blank drive at the Rochdale goal, but Biggar brought off a brilliant save. As the interval hove into slight the visitors got away and Page made a very feeble attempt to tackle Tully, who ran past the Everton back and scored for Rochdale, Bromilow having no chance. Half-time Everton 1, Rochdale 2.

NOTTS COUNTY 0 EVERTON 1
January 6, 1912. The Liverpool Courier.
MUD AND RAIN AT NOTTINGHAM.
RETURN OF BROWELL.
First impression pointed to the fact that Everton would have an easy task at Nottingham on Saturday, but this was far from being the case, and it was only be herculean efforts that the team managed to score early on and retain the lead to the finish. Under the adverse conditions that prevailed, it became a question as to which side would better stay the course, and it was a tribute to trainer Elliott that the man under his charge with stood the desperate rushes of a side out to get a point at any cost, and then to finish up in fairly fresh condition. On the pasty surface, rendered so by hours of heavy rain, it was not to be expected that there would be forthcoming those nicer touches of play; yet the game was not without its attractiveness in this respect, for interlarded with the long swinging passes adopted by both sides were some clever passing movements in which the Everton players showed their superiority. It was from a smart and combined incisive attack that Browell played the pay for Brannick to score what proved to be the only point recorded in the game, but it was marvellous how Williams missed equalising when but a couple of yards from goal after Caldwell had dropped the ball and left the Notts player with an open breach.

FORWARD CHANGES.
Injuries to Fleetwood and Uren led to the inclusion of Browell and Davidson, while the reserve right wing in Chedgzoy and Brannick, filled the positions of Beare, and Jefferis. The return of Browell was well timed, as on the heavy ground he did remarkably well both in controlling the ball and opening out the game. Had the ball come from the wings to his satisfaction he must have been more than once a scorer, and it was in this respect that Chedgzoy, with his lobbing centres in the air instead of a swift ground pass, failed to meet the exigencies of the situation. There could be no question that Browell played a big part in the success of his side, and when normal conditions again prevail he is certain to get among the goals. On either side of him were Bradshaw and Brannick or the play of the three inside men was a prominent feature of the game. Bradshaw in particular simply revelled in the mud, and his at times single-handed efforts merited a tangible point. Brannick will make a very useful emergency man. Wasting no time, he makes off in the right direction, and his goal, though engineered by Browell, was a really clever effort. Wing play was not sufficiently robust on such a day as Saturday, and it was well that the Everton halves were in np humour for granting quarter. Grenyer again demonstrated his ability as a left half back. He had no compeer either in initiative or defence, and that he stayed the pace right up to the finish bore ample testimony to his earnestness and skill. Too, gave a rare good display; while the warhouse Harris, when not otherwise engaged, nipped across to lighten the task of the comrades.

Clever Defences.
Generally speaking it was mainly due to the assiduous play of the Everton halves that the game was brought to a definite issue, and as the “trio” are playing at present, the best of forwards will find this department a difficult obstacle to overcome. Further behind were a resolute pair of backs in Stevenson and Macconnachie, and though the latter was occasionally uncertain in his anticipation he made some very smart recoveries. Caldwell, with the exception of the incident already refered to gave nothing away, and the work of the defensive portion of the team can be summed up an eminently satisfactory. The lengthy Iremonger was a stout barrier to the inroads of the Everton forwards, and by the aid of entirely different methods Morley and West ably covered him. Flint played a really clever game against Bradshaw and Davidson, but the forwards, though they were unfortunately handicapped by an injury to Waterall in the first half, that led to his retirement later on, was never convincing against the steady opposition of the Everton defenders. On the general play Everton earned their victory, and after the match the players returned to their training quarters at Blackpool for further preparation for the Cup-ties. Teams: - Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (Captain), backs Harris, Wareing, and Grenyer, half-backs, Chedgzoy, Brannick, Browell, Brawshaw, and Davidson, forwards. Notts County: - Iremonger, goal, Morley, and West, backs, Flint, Clamp, and Allsebrook, half-backs, Hooper Williams, Henshall, Jones, and Waterall, forwards. Referee Mr. W. Chadwick.


EVERTON RESERVES 3 ROCHDALE RESERVES 2
January 6, 1913. The Liverpool Courier.
CENTRAL LEAGUE
Rochdale have paid two visits to the city within four days, and on each occasion they had to submit to defeat. At Anfield on Wednesday there were decisively defeated by seven goals to nil, but against Everton they gave a much better display, and were only beaten by the odd goal in five. It was a hard and determined struggle, and the Blues only won by reason of their superior staying powers. The game opened in a lively fashion, and within three minutes Rochdale, were one up, McKinley doing the trick with his head from a melee in the home goalmouth. Clever play by Smith enabled Gault to equalise, but before the interval. Tully again placed Rochdale ahead. In the second moiety the superior condition of the home players told its tale, and after a grim struggle the visiting custodian had twice to submit to defeat. The scorers being Johnson and Simms. Everton: - Bromilow goal, Page, and Holbem, backs, Parker, Browell, and Simpson half-backs, Smith, Gault Simms, Wright, and Johnson, forwards, Rochdale: - Bigger, goal, J.W. Barton and Henfurson, backs, Chick, Broome, and Birnie, half-backs, Spinks, Tully, Cunline, McKinlay and Smith.

EVERTON SECURE NEW OUTSIDE LEFT
January 16 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool
Everton New Player
Everton have signed on a new player in the persons of J, Stevens, the Clyde outside left. This player has been spoken of as one of the best outside lefts in Scotland. I understand the player comes Everton with very high credentials. Stevens was born at Aylesbury (Bucks), and came into football prominence with the Chesterfield club, and joined the ranks of the Clyde some three years ago. He is about 25 years of age, and is much the same build as Joe Smith. He is fast, and centres with precision and accuracy.

Notts County Beaten
Everton showed greatly improved form at Nottingham, and I am pleased to note that Browell signallied his reappearance by playing in clever style, but his returns from the wing men apparently were not of the best. It would seen the wing positions are causing trouble, and perhaps Joe Smith, who is playing exceptionally well and with the Reserves just now might be given a trial with advantage. Certainly one would think the heavy grounds would suit him. First impressions pointed to the fact that Everton would have an easy task at Nottingham (writes Rover), but this was far from being the case, and it was only by berculean efforts that the team managed to score early on and retain the lead to the finish. Under the adverse conditions that prevailed it became a question as to which side would better stay the course, and it was a tribute to trainer Elliott that the men under his charge with stood the desperate rushes of a side out to get a point at any cost, and then to finish up in fairly fresh conditions. On the pasty surfaces rendered so by hours of heavy rain, it was not to be expected that there would be forthcoming these nicer touches of play; yet the game was not without its attractiveness in this respect, for interlarded with the long swinging passes adopted by both sides were some clever passing movements in which the Everton players showed their superiority. It was from a smart and combined incisive attack that Browell paved the way for Brannick to score what proved to be the only point recorded in the game, but it was marvellous how Willaimson missed equalising when but a couple of yards from goal, after Caldwell had dropped the ball and left the Notts player with an open breach.

Browell Plays Well.
The return of Browell was well timed, as on the heavy ground he did remarkably well both in controlling the ball and opening out the game. Had the ball come from the wings to his satisfaction he must have been more than once a score, and it was in this respect that Chedgzoy with his lobbing centres in the air instead of a swift ground pass failed to meet the extended of the situation. There could be no question that Browell played a big part in the success of his side, and when normal conditions again prevail he is certain to get among the goals. On either side of him were Bradshaw and Brannick and the play of the three inside men was a prominent feature of the game. Bradshaw in particular simply revelled in the “mud” and at times single-handed efforts merited a tangible point. Brannick will make a very useful emergency men. Wasting no time, he makes off in the right direction, and his goal, though engineered by Browell, was a really clever effort. Wing play was not sufficiently robost on such a day as Saturday, and it was well that the Everton halves were in no humour for grafting quarter. Grenyer again demonstrated his ability as a left half back. He had no compeer, either in initiative or defence, and that he stayed the pace right up to the finish bore simple testimony to his earnestness and skill. Wareing too, gave a fare good displays while the warhorse Harris when not otherwise engaged nipped across to lighten the task of his comrades.

Clever Defences.
Generally speaking it was mainly due to the assiduous play of the Everton halves that the game was brought to a definite issue, and as the “trio” are playing at present the best of forwards will find this department a difficult obstacle to overcome. Further behind were a resolute pair of backs in Stevenson and MaConnachie, and though the latter was occasionally uncertain in his anticipation, he made some very smart recoveries. Caldwell, with the exception of the incident already referred to, gave nothing away and the work of the defensive portion of the team can be sustained up as eminently satisfactory. The lengthy Iremonger was a stout barrier for the inroads of the Everton forwards, and by the aid of entirely different methods he was ably covered by Morley and West.

EVERTON SIGN STEVENS, OF CLYDE.
Tuesday 7 January 1913 Dundee Courier
Mr Cuff, of Everton, has signed J. Stevens, of the Clyde Club. Born in Aylesbury (Bucks.), Stevens first came into football prominence with the Chesterfield club, and joined the ranks of the Clyde some three seasons ago. He is about 25 years of age, and is modelled on similar lines to Joe Smith, who is showing exceptionally good form with the Everton Reserves just now. Stevens one of the fastest outside lefts in Scottish football, and the accuracy of his centres is one of the outstanding features, of his game. Stevens, as is well known, has been anxious to get back to England, where his wife has been ill for over twelve months.

PREPARING FOR THE CUP-TIE
January 7, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool.
By the Critic.
Everton and Sheffield Wednesday are among the clubs who have chosen Blackpool, and from what I hear the Goodison players especially are delighted with the change of air.
A Fishing Expedition.
The men for the most part are taking matters quietly, sprinting and walking excises being the main “work.” The players go in for golf largely, and yesterday morning a fishing expedition set out, and good sport was enjoyed. The players returned with a good catch, and on reaching their headquarters they turned one of the baths into a miniature, aquarium. I had a chat with Mr. C. cuff this morning and he tells me that the men are going on very nicely. There is no second fixture this week-end, and the team to oppose Stockport County in the first round of the cup may not be chosen until late on in the week. Everton are not likely to leave anything to chance, and the directors are sure to place their strongest available team in the field

Shea Left West Ham for Blackburn
Shea told an interviewer that Glasgow Rangers offer him £7 a week whilst after a cup-tie at Newcastle United, the Tynesides would have liked him. The Chelsea made a big offer, and Everton are said to have made a substantial offer for Shea and Ashton but nothing was mentioned to Shea.

EVERTON AND STOCKPORT January 8 1913. Evening Express Liverpool
By the Critic.
Everton players are enjoying their golf at Blackpool, and I understand the men are in good fettle. Although the “Blues” ought to win somewhat easily they are not likely to hold the Stockport county team cheaply and the “Blues” may be depended on to make the issue safe as soon as they can. With the County a go-a-head sort of team they are bound to give some trouble, and the match is likely to prove a duel between science and skill on the one side and dash on the other. There ought also be some interesting football .

McCULLOCH TO BLACKPOOL
January 9 1913. The Liverpool Echo.
McCulloch, the Everton half-back has been transferred to the Blackpool club. He came from a district off Glasgow, at the beginning of the season, and appeared at right half. Blackpool will probably play him centre half.

EVERTON TEAM
January 11 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool.
The Everton team has not yet been chosen, and although Uren and Makepeace have been in training with the other players at Blackpool, it is not expected that either of them will be included in the team.

EVERTON
January 11, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool.
Stockport County at the Park.
Stopped by Storm.
After each side had Scored.
Play Impossible after Interval.
By Rover.
This afternoon Goodison Park presented a terrible aspect, and it was doubtful for some time whether the gates would be opened, but at two o'clock it was decided that the game should be played. The few spectators who had assembled made the most of the covered accommodation and the enterprise of the directors in this latter respect was justified and fully appreciated. At 2 30 the sides turned out as follows: - Everton : - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (captain), backs, Harris, Wareing, and Grenyer, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, and Davidson, forwards. Stockport County: - Mclvor, goal, Goodwin, and Fagan, backs, Tappersall, Garrett, and Blair, half-backs, Crosthwaite, Rogers, Chivers, Chorlton, and O'Brien, forwards. Referee W.J.Heath.

Mud Larking Begins.
At the outset the players, us only to be expected, experienced the greatest difficulty in maintaining a foothold, and the early stages consisted in nothing else but blunders. Consequently the ball traveled but feet when yards was intended. Early on Bowell got in a long shot from a pass by Bradshaw, but the keeper anticipated the danger, and getting low down brought off a good save. Returning again the County keeper handed out a ball from Jefferis. Still he only partly cleared, and had the home left been up a certain goal must have accrued. Again attacking, Beare dropped in a capital centre, which Browell headed wide, and then Wareing in taking a short drive against an opponent forced a fruitless corner. Everton were having matters all their own way just now, and with a little luck must have opened the scoring.

Scene Changes.
Then came a change over the proceedings, as Chivers led on his men to the other end, Rogers made further progress with the result that a corner kick was morced and well placed, However, MaConnachie came to the rescue, though it was but temporarily as Crosthwaite narrowed in, and when in a good position put to Rogers who, unfortunately for the visitors, lay in an offside position. Then came another onslaught on the County goal, which led to Jefferis finally shooting over. Still on the whole the play was but a travesty on the game, and as the downfall of snow was heavier the playing pitch was rendered more and more treacherous. It became a question, as a whether the game ought to be continued.

Everton Goal.
Everton kept up a persistent attack and from one strong movement McLvor brought off a fine ground save from Davidson. An indication of how the game had been going was furnished by the churned up side of the Stockport half of the field, but the visitors had stood up bravely to the persistent attack of the home forwards, and on he whole they defended in able fashion. Browell following one advance, had the bad luck to see the ball rebound from the crossbar and after further pressure the Stockport left got away. The inside made good progress, but failed to centre the ball, and play dribbled to the other end again. Then Browell missed a perfect centre from Davidson, and following a corner McIvor fisted out from a lot of players in the mouth of goal, McIvor fisted out from a ruck of players in the mouth of the goal. Then O'Brien and Chorlton created a diversion on the County left, by Stevenson finally got the ball away. Then came a smart sprint from Beare, who finished up with a capital centre. Goodiwin miskicked, and the way was opened for Browell. McIvor anticipated the danger and ran out, but he was not in time to prevent Browell in getting his foot to the ball, and the scoring was opened after twenty-eight minute splay.

An Equaliser.
After this reverse the County forward made something of a show, but as before they found themselves up against sturdy pair backs and could not get within shooting range. However, their persistency was rewarded Crosthwaite managed to elude MaConnachie and sent in a shot which Caldwell met but only punched it a couple of yards out. There lay Tattersall who taking deliberate aim with the keeper out of his charge equalised the score, Everton then advanced, Beare put into the net, but in doing so he had held Fagan and the point was disallowed. The County success had given them much confidence and for some little time they gave the Everton defenders some anxious moments. Most of their attacks were taken on the left, but putting the shots were denied them. Then the Blues were well placed just a few yards from the goal, but their shooting lacked power.

Half-time Everton 1 Stockport County 1
Comments.
The ground was in a shocking state for football, and with the snow failing fast during the first half the players on both sides found great difficulty in playing their usual game. Although Everton found great difficulty in playing their usual game. Although Everton were the superior side Stockport played up manfully and succeeded in equalising the score.

Match Abandoned.
The snow was still falling heavily when the players turned out and the referee at once called the captains of the teams and the linesmen together to discuss whether or not play should proceed. However after a brief consultation it was decided to go on with hostilities were resumed, but play had only been in progress minute or two during which time Davidson sent in a very fine shot, which the Stockport keeper cleverly saved when the referee abandon the game, and the players trooped off the field. The conditions were unfit for football, and it was quite obvious that the game should never have been started. The score at the stoppage stood one goal each.

The Gate Receipts
The gate receipts amounted to £252, and the attendance was 6,000. The replay will be on Wednesday at 2-30.

EVERTON 1 STOCKPORT COUNTY 1
January 13, 1912. The Liverpool Courier.
FA CUP ROUND ONE
MATCH ABANDONED AFTER 48 MINUTES.
FARCICAL FOOTBALL AT GOODISON
The conditions at Goodison Park were altogether unsuited for the pursuit of outdoor sport, and to the general surprise of all the referee decided that the game should be played. Consequently the gates were opened at two o'clock and about 5,000 who had braved the elements trooped on to ground. The extensive covered accommodation –the result of the club's enterprise –had not a little to do with what may rightly be termed a remarkable attendance under the extraordinary conditions that prevailed, and it speaks well for the enthusiasm engendered in the tie when it is stated that the gate receipts realised £252. However, the game should never have been started, for the playing pitch was enveloped in two to three inches of snow, and as the game progressed the surface was churned up to such an extent that the ball simply refused to travel on the heavy going. Skill played a very unimportant part in the proceedings; and on such a pitch it was anybody's game. The occasions, however, served to demonstrate that the Stockport County players were prepared to stop at nothing whereby to keep out their more fancied opponents, and though the Cheshire men were often over-played, they put up a determined resistance near goal that suggested that the “Blues” under better conditions would have met with strenuous opposition in their efforts to piece the last lines of defence. Play proceeded uninterruptedly during the first half. At the end of 28 minutes, Browell opened the scoring from a centre by Beare, while prior to this McIvor, the County keeper, showed capital judgement in dealing with shots from Beare and the centre forwards. The Evertonians had the bulk of the play during this period, but there was times when the visitors wingers showed their paces and called for the best work of Stevenson and Macconnachie. From one of their advances Caldwell effected a weak clearance by punching the ball but a few yards, where Tattersall was in a good position for netting, with the result that the scores were levelled up. On resuming the referee called the captains and Linesmen together, and after the consultation it was decided to proceed. However, there was no abatement; in fact, the bizzard increased in intensity, and the referee had no alliterative other man of abandoning the game. There was some dissatisfaction among the crowd regarding the turn of events, but the directors of the Everton Club were in no way responsible. It was not until the referee had inspected the ground and declared it fit for play that the gates were thrown open. The replay takes place on Wednesday next at 2-30. Teams: - Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (captain), backs, Harris, Wareing, and Grenyer, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, and Davidson, forwards. Stockport County: - Mclvor, goal, Goodwin, and Fagan, backs, Tappersall, Garrett, and Blair, half-backs, Crosthwaite, Rogers, Chivers, Chorlton, and O'Brien, forwards. Referee W.J.Heath.

LOCAL AFFAIRS.
January 13, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool.
By the Critic
Locally the conditions were very sloppy indeed, and the greatest surprise of the day was to find that at one side of the Park the referee declared the ground unfit for play, whilst at Goodison the ruling official decided to go on who was right? It certainly seem unfit and what “football” there was at Goodison Park during the time played was in progress showed the ground to be in a terrible state. The conditions were miserable in the extreme, and an early arrival at the ground could not see anybody until he discovered a few spectators huddled up in a corner of the stands, and the band playing “Everybody's doing it.” The music of the band was certainly very acceptable on Saturday. It cheered the chilled spirit of the crowd. By the way it must be understood that the Everton directors did not open the gates until the referee declared the ground fit. The gate of £252 was very good under the circumstances. As regards the play, there was very little in it if we except the blundering and sliding through the snow. Some of the players made the mistake of trying to dribble too much, and it was easy to see that anything might have happened. Although Stockport County were on the defensive for most part they showed dash, and they were quick to take advantage of openings. There are prospects of a good game on Wednesday. Yesterday the Everton players returned to Blackpool, and they will travel to Liverpool on Wednesday morning. The team will probably be the same as on Saturday. By the way, it may be mentioned, as showing that football players take more interest than some people give them credit for, that immediately the Liverpool against Bristol match was declared off, the Anfield players sprinted across to the Everton ground to see their “display” there. Wedlock was also an interested spectator, and is possible he may play on Wednesday.

THE EVERTON TIE.
January 14, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool
By the Critic
The snow has been cleared from the playing space at Goodison Park. Judging by the show Stockport County made on Saturday, it is felt they will give the “Blues” a good game. The Stockport people have great faith in the ability of their defence to withstand the Everton attacks. Their forwards, too, are youthful, and if enthusiasm goes for anything the Everton defences is likely to be fully tried. The Cheshire club are replying on the same side as that which did duty on Saturday whilst Everton also will probably reply on the eleven players who plugged through the snow for 50 minutes on Saturday. It is quite evident that the “Blues” must put their best foot foremost in order to ensure an appearance in the second round. The teams will line up at 2-30 as follows: - Everton; Caldwell; Stevenson MaConnachie; Harris, Wareing, and Grenyer; Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, and Davidson. Stokcport; McIvor; Goodwin, Fagan; Tattersall Garratt, and Blair; Crosthwaite, Rodgers, Chivers, Charlton, and O'Brien.

EVERTON V STOCKPORT
January 15, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool
Browell Does the hat-trick
Decisive Victory
County's Appeal Against Second Goal
There would be more than 7,000 spectators at Everton. The ground was in fair condition although heavy going. No changes were made in either teams. Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (captain), backs, Harris, Wareing, and Grenyer, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, and Davidson, forwards. Stockport County: - Milver, goal, Goodwin, and Fagan, backs, Tattersall, Garrett, and Blair, half-backs, Crosthwaite, Rodgers, Chivers, Charlton, and O'Brien, forwards. Referee W.J.Heath. Everton opened the scoring in the first few minutes' play. Right from the start Everton were aggressive, Davidson taking advantage of a long pass from the right wing to make considerable progress down the line. The effort resulted in a corner kick, which was well placed, and McIvor was fortunate to scrape the ball round the post for another corner. This was again excellently placed by the Everton right winger, and Wareing meeting the ball dove it hard into the corner of the net.

Two Minutes After the Start.
From the centre the Stockport forwards made an attempt to get going on the right, but McCannachie's intervention put an end to their ambitions, and Beare was soon racing away with a clear field. He dribbled the ball to the line, and with Browell and Bradshaw waiting in front of the post, he waited too long with his transfer and an unproductive corner off Goodwin was the only result. Still keeping up pressure Browell let fly with a strong shot, but fortunately for the visitors McIvor was in the direct line of fire. Thereabouts Charlton made a praiseworthy attempt to break through the home defence. After a clever effort Charlton passed to O'Brien who centred and Stevenson, in saving the situation, was rewarded by having his pants torn, necessitating.

A change of Attire.
The County forwards were now asserting themselves and Caldwell was fairly caught napping when in picking up a slow ball near the line with plenty of time to clear, he elbowed Richards to dispossess him; and after regaining possession he again lost the ball, as he was charged by Crosthwaite, but he finally managed to save the situation by kicking the ball into touch. A lengthy spell of even play followed, and neither goalkeeper was called upon to save. The players were having considerable difficulty in keeping their equilibrium, and several times they lost their balance to “enjoy” a first class mud bath. On one occasion the County goal had a narrow escape when Davidson centred accurately and McIvor stumbled in catching the ball with Browell on top f him. The goalkeeper, however, came out of the difficult position with flying colours. Another fine shot from Bradshaw was equally well placed by the County custodian.

Everton's Second Goal.
Came in an unexpected manner. The ball was crossed over from the left, and Jefferis in trying to break through, was floored and temporally injured, but as he fell Browell shot the leather through, the ball hitting the far post and just crossing the line. This happened after half-an-hour's play. Jefferis quickly recovered, and Browell just missed the target with another capital effort. The County players strongly protested against Everton's second goal on the ground of offside, but their

Appeals Went Unheeded.
And the referee was evidently convinced of the justice of his decision. Play now remained almost entirely in the visitors' quarters, and the goal had another narrow escape when Beare sent right cross and Bradshaw was just too late to meet the skidding ball, which went behind. Wareing was fairly revelling in the mud, and backed by the excellent defence presented by Stevenson and MaConnachie, the County forwards were allowed no opportunity of shinning. On one occasion Rodgers broke through, but the Everton captain kicked clear before the penalty line was reached. The nearest attempt Stockport came to scoring was just on the interval, when O'Brien was inches wide with a fine cross shot out of Caldwell's reach.

Half-time Everton 2 Stockport County 0
Stockport had two excellent chances of scoring after resuming. Ten minutes of the second half had been in progress when Charlton scored with a grand shot. A few minutes later Browell scored for Everton,

Browell's Hat-Trick
In scoring a fourth goal for the Blues, Browell performed the hat trick. His goal was a beauty, and truly a magnificent effort. He received a pass from Bradshaw, and with an oblique shot beat McIvor all to pieces, Bradshaw scored a fifth from a pass from Browell. Final Result Everton 5, Stockport County 1 Goal Scorers; Everton-Wareing, Browell (3), and Bradshaw, Stockport –Charlton.

EVERTON 5 STOCKPORT COUNTY 1 (Fa Cup Game 90)
January 16, 1913. The Liverpool Courier.
Fa Cup Round One.
EVERTON IN FORM.
BROWELL PREFORMS THE “HAT TRICK.”
The game at Goodison Park produced an abundance of hard, keen football, and although as the score of 5-1 suggests, Everton held the whip hand in through the Stockport County players fought pluckily right to the end. One could not fail to admire their persistency, even though their efforts were poorly balanced and devoid of polish. It must be remembered that the sought Everton in tip-top form, and while their backs had to deal with forwards who were speedy, clever and forceful their own front line were given but little latitude by the home halves and backs. Everton gave a most praisework display. Considering the heavy going and slippery state of the ground the forwards showed really smart footwork and effective passing. Browell once again rose to great heights and apart from the three goals he scored he put in no end of straight drives. McIvor, the Stockport keeper, took a lot of beating and but for his smart goalkeeping the visitors would have come out of the ordeal much less satisfactory than they did. He saved at least a dozen shots, which were dead on the target, and several of his clearances were made under great difficulties.

THE PLAY DESCRIBED.
The ground had been entirely cleared of snow, but as was only to be expected the turf was sodden and very slippery. Everton attacked right from the start, Davidson taking advantage of a long pass from the right wing to make considerable progress down the line. The efforts resulted in a corner kick, which was well placed, and McIvor was fortunate to push the ball round the post for another corner. The Everton right winger again excellently placed this, and Wareing meeting the ball drove it hard into the top corner of the two minutes after the start. After this early reverse the Stockport backs had few idea moments. Beare dallied too long after one fine sprint, and then Browell had a hot shot stopped by McIver. The next incident of note was a clever breakaway by Chorlton. He passed to O'Brien, who centred, and Stevenson in saving the situation was rewarded by having his pants torn, necessitating of attire. The County forwards again asserted themselves, and Caldwell was fairly caught napping when he was picking up a slow ball near the line. With plenty of time to clear he allowed Rodgers to dispossess him, and after regaining possession, he again lost the ball as he was charged by Crosthwaite, but he finally managed to save the situation by kicking the ball into touch. On one occasion the County goal had a narrow escape when Davidson centred accurately and McIvor stumbling in catching the ball, with Browell on top of him. The goalkeeper, however, came out of a difficult position with flying colours. Another fine shot from Bradshaw was equally well saved by the County custodian. Everton second goal, after half an hour play came in an unexpected manner. The ball was crossed over from the left, and Jefferis in trying to break through was floored, and temporarily injured, but as he fell Browell go possession, and let drive, the ball hitting the far post, and just crossing the line. The Stockport players appeared for offside, but the referee who had a clear view of the incident never nesiated in awarding a goal. Early in the second half, Stockport had two good chances of scoring. A long punt between the backs put Chorlton in possession, but he was over whelmed before he could get his shot in. A similar movement gave Oliver a clear run through but when a score appeared inevitable he delayed his shot right in front of the posts, and was dispossessed by Stevenson, whose speed served him in good stead. There was great jubilation amongst the followers of the Stockport team when at length Chorlton scored with a grand shot from a pass by Rodgers. The subsequent play, however, continued in Everton a favour and Browell contributed two more goals. The second one was a beauty with an oblique shot following a thrown in on the right wing. Bradshaw added a fifth, a forward pass by Browell giving his opportunity for dashing in and scoring with a low, swift shot.

EVERTON'S TRUSTY HALVES.
Everton gave a really well-balanced display. The forward worked together with complete harmony, and Browell once again showed his powess as a sharp shooter. Jefferis put in a lot of good work and he was more than once unlucky in not scoring. The home half-backs were a most formidable trio. Wareing was a tower of strength at centre half and he combined with his sure tackling sound judgement in feeding his forwards. Harris and Grenyer also put in a lot of hard work. The Everton backs were equally sound and Stevenson was once again seen to great advantage showing rare speed and strong kicking. It was perhaps as well that Caldwell was not severely tested, for more than once he seemed a bit shaky. The Stockport forwards were much too slow in their attempts at passing to be really effective and they were sadly lacking in finishing power. Chorlton was the best of the five, this footwork at times being districtly clever. The Stockport halves were hard workers and Eagan and Godwin put in a hard fight at full back. Their most useful player, however, was McIvor who proved himself a custodian of no mean worth. Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (Captain), backs, Harris, Wareing, and Grenyer, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, and Davidson, forwards. Stockport County: - Milver, goal, Goodwin, and Fagan, backs, Tattersall, Garrett, and Blair, half-backs, Crosthwaite, Rodgers, Chivers, Chorlton, and O'Brien, forwards. Referee W.J.Heath.

BROWELL'S HAT-TRICK
January 16, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool
By the Critic
Tom Browell's shooting was the feature of Everton's victory, and it is quite evident that the centre-forward has returned to his best form. He took the ball from all sorts of angles with all his old precision and accuracy and one of his goals at least was a real beauty. The youthful centres hat-trick will probably have an invigorating effort upon the side, and I trust Browell will continue in the same vein. The “Blues” all round were too good for Stockport County, who, with two or three exceptions, were out classed. Beare and Davidson are to be congratulated on they fine wing work, the outside right men showing an advance, the forward line was all that could be desired. The halves too, were good, Wareing especially revelling in the mire. The defence was equal to all demands, and there were indications that the team has come back to its best form, and a good run in the cup-ties is hoped for.

A Clever Stockport Forward.
Stockport County's cleverest man was Charlton, who showed remarkable control of the ball, and his goal, was thoroughly merited, the smart solo effort which preceded it being one of the best bits of playing during the game, Charlton is clever, and Everton might do worse than secure him. Next to Charlton, Crosthwaite showed up well in the County equintette, and the shot which he put in just prior to the interval had beaten Caldwell in its flight, but went just outside of the far upright. This was the only really critical period for the home defence during the first half, but soon after resuming Chivers (who was bottled up completely by Wareing) was given a couple of fine openings, but failed to turn to good account

Everton v Manchester United.
For this match Everton are playing the same team as against Stockport County. In view of the importance of the match the directors could not see their way to grant Harris permission to assist Ireland. The Everton Reserves team to oppose Manchester United Reserves has been chosen thus; Bromilow; Page, Holbem; Parker, Fleetwood, Simpson; Smith, Brannick, Simms, Wright, and Stevens. This is the first appearance of Stevens, the new outside left.

MANCHESTER UNITED VISIT EVERTON.
January 17, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool.
Locally there is an attractive fixture, which should provide a tip-top game. Manchester United, one of the most improved teams of recent months, are the visitors, and enthusiasts are keen to see the Old Trafford brigade. They have dropped but two points since the end of November, and have not lost a point away from home. This is good going, if you like. Look at the record since December came in.

Play 8 won 6 lost 0 draw 2 for 20 against 5 points 14

V Shefield United (home) 4-0 v Chelsea (home) 4-2

V Newcastle United (away) 3-1 v Manchester City (away) 2-0

V Oldham Athletic (home) 0-0 V Birmingham City (home) 2-0

V Chelsea (away) 4-1 v West Bromwich (home) 1-1

Total 20-5

In addition to this fine record there is the away cup success. Yesterday though it was only in the last minute that they gained the winning goal, it was quite evident that they are playing at the top of their form, and the inclusion of Anderson (centre-forward) with West at inside left has infused much spirit into the forward line. In view of the fact that Everton have recently shown a return to their most sparkling form their supporters are not without hope of success. It will be recalled that Browell made his debut against Manchester United at the Park, and scored a couple of goals, but Charlie Roberts is not likely to allow so much rope as he did on that occasion. Still Browell, at his best, is clever enough for anything as a marksman, and Roberts will need to keep a strict eye on him. The United participated in a strenuous encounter yesterday, and they may not be as fresh as they would like, but still the eleven, whatever it may be, is not likely to give anything away. The Everton team will turn out as selected Caldwell; Stevenson, MaConnachie; Harris, Wareing, Grenyer; Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, Davidson.

ATTRACTIVE MATCH AT GOODISON
January 18, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool
The inter-city matches between Liverpool and Manchester generally produce keen and interesting football, and the visit of Manchester united promises to be a hard struggle. Both of these teams have been showing a welcome return to their true form. The last month or two, but it is not likely that Everton will win by the same margin of four clear goals, as they did in the corresponding match last season. The Everton team will be unchanged and in view of the importance of the match the directors have not allowed Harris permission to assist Ireland.

EVERTON
January 18, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool
(“Blues” won 4-0 last season)
Manchester United at Goodison
Crop of Goals –And Injuries.
Visitors Routed by Four to One.
Browell In Form
By Cosmo
Everything was in favour of bright and interesting football at Goodison Park this afternoon. The weather, was fine, and the cold but bracing atmosphere was relieved by outburst of sunshine. The ground was in fair condition, the slush left by the snowstorm having been completely swept away. Unfortunately the Manchester United team was not at full strength. Anderson who has been the sheet anchor of their attack this last month or two, was unable to play, and his place was taken by Nuttall and Hamill appeared at inside left in place of West. There were also two changes in the intermediate line, Whalley being at centre half vice Roberts and Bell took the place of Whalley at left half-back. The teams were: - Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (captain), backs, Harris, Wareing, and Grenyer, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, and Davidson, forwards. Manchester United: - Beale, goal, Hodge, and Stacey, backs, Duckworth, Whalley, and Bell, half-backs, Sheldon, Turnbull, Nuttall, Hamill, and Wall, forwards. Referee Mr. R. Eccles.

Tame Opening.
There would be fully 20,000 spectators at the start. Following an advantage by the United left wing Stevenson got in a lusty punt and Bradshaw made a valiant attempt to take the ball on the run, but failed. The game had opened pretty tamely, but some uneasiness was caused when a pass out to the United left gave Wall a chance of shooting. The Manchester winger let drive with plenty of force, but his shot went wide of the target. Play then livened up and a swinging pass over to the United left saw Wall place in front, Harris intercepting in the neck of time. Then the crowd were raised to enthusiasm by a clever sprint by Beare, who after cleverly circumventing Bell centred accurately, Beale having to fist out a header from Bradshaw. A similar movement again spelt danger to the United goal, another centre by Beare causing the United keeper to fist away. The United goal had a narrow escape soon afterwards. Receiving from Jefferis, Bradshaw headed forward to Browell. The home centre dashed clean in and a goal seemed certain when Beale rushed out smartly and smothered his shot.

Scoring Opened.
As yet the United forwards had done nothing noticeable, and they were being held well in check by the home backs. Then Beale had to spring into the air to keep out a long shot from Davidson right from the line. It was a capital shot and well merited the heavy cheering it received. Everton opened the scoring thirteen minutes from the start. A well-placed corner kick by Beare ended in the ball being dropped right in front. An exciting rush followed, in which Wareing got his head to the ball and placed into the net. This reverse served to put more spirit into the United attack, and Nuttall, was looking dangerous when he was floored by Stevenson just outside the penalty line. Everton were soon attacking again in determined fashion, and Browell got in one strong shot only to put wide.

Lost Opportunity.
Some, neat work was then shown between Turnbull and Sheldon, and from the latter's centre Nuttall made an unsuccessful attempt to divert goalwards. The Everton left wing were finding Hodge the United left back, a stubborn defender. Stacey was equally trustworthy. Browell next missed a good opening through sheer dallying. When he received the ball from Wareing he had only the keeper to beat, but he wasted too long, and finally his shot was deflected clear of the goal. A minute later the United keeper, who had come out to save, had failed to get the ball away, when he was rushed by Beare. He, however, clung to the ball until able to clear. A spirited rush by the Manchester inside men looked like bringing disaster West skimming the bar with a header. The game was now being evenly and stubbornly contested.

Keeper Disabled.
Davidson was next prominent with a capital shot, but Beale saved and the lively rush that followed the keeper was disabled through coming into contact with Browell, who shot just wide of the ternate. Smart passing was being shown by both sets of forward. Just before the interval neat work by Jefferis ended in Browell scoring with a ground shot after he had floored Stacey. A minute later Davidson was rather badly injured and had to be assisted off the field, and had no sooner departed than Turnbull met with an injury, which caused him also to retire.

Halt-Time Everton 2, Manchester United 0
First Half Comments.
Everton deserved their lead at the interval. They had been the better-balanced team, and had slightly the better of the play and had the lion's share of attacking. Both sides lacked penetrative skill. Nuttall at centre forward for the United proved a poor substitute for Anderson.

Second Half.
The crowd had increased full 30,000 were present when the second half opened. The United commenced with only ten men, Turnbull being absent, but Davidson had recovered to resume. Everton opened in determined fashion, and Beale had two hot shots to stop from Browell and Beare respectively. Sheldon then put in some clever work and from his centre Wall got in a strong shot. Caldwell diverting the ball over the bar with the tips of his fingers. The United forwards were by no means idle, and Hamill, who had taken the place of Turnbull cleverly worked his way round MaConnachie and with a strong shot taken on the run clean beat the keeper

Two More Goals.
This goal came after six minutes play of the second half, and from the centre kick the Everton forwards rushed down on the United goal. The ball was sent out to Beare, who after striking Stacey placed in front giving Jefferis an opportunity of scoring his first goal of the season, of which he took full advantage. Everton came again in determined fashion, and a stoppage followed through Stacey being put out of action for a brief period. There was quite a charter of accidents at this period. First bell, then Hamill, and Wareing sustained injuries, which called for the attention of the respective trainers. All of them however, were able to resume. Harris saved dangerous situation, dispossessing Hamill when he was making a bee-line for goal. The Manchester forwards were showing great keenness and the home backs were having all their work cut out to keep them in check. Then Everton had a spell of attacking, which ended in Jefferis shooting straight at the keeper, Beare and Jefferis showed.

Clever Passing.
And from the latter's centre Browell headed just wide. At the other end a pass out to Wall ended in the winger shooting wide. Beare was injured but he quickly recovered and in the next attack the United keeper had to be might quick to keep out a dangerous header. Everton continued to force matters and Jefferis had two unsuccessful attempts to find the goal. The United men were showing rare vigour, and considering they were a men short they were having a good share of attacking. Following one well planned corner kick Whalley headed over the bar. Ten minutes from the end Browell increased Everton's lead from a pass by Bradshaw. The United next attacked strongly on the right, and an exciting scrimmage followed right in the jaws of the goal. Caldwell saving under difficulties.

Browell in Form.
The ball was quickly taken to the other end, and Browell came near to scoring the ball striking the foot of the post. The closing stages were fought with great energy, but no further scoring took place.
Final result Everton 4, Manchester united 1.

EVERTON RES V. MANCHESTER U RES.
January 18,1913. Evening Express, Liverpool
At Manchester. Everton played Stevens, who hails from Clyde, whilst Manchester played Woodcock for Sheldon, and Briddon for Hamill. United attacked, but the shooting was wretched. Simms put in one good shot which nearly beat the goalkeeper, Everton were mainly on the defensive and play on the whole was poor. Interval Everton 0, Manchester 0.

EVERTON 4 MANCHESTER UNITED 1
January 20, 1913. The Liverpool Courier.
EVERTON'S BIG MARGIN.
UNITED A DISAPPOINTING SIDE.
The game at Goodison Park did not realise the fullest expectations. The cup-tie game had left Manchester United with crippled forces, and the crowd of close on 30,000 was not privileged to see the United with the same personnel that has given such meritorious displays this last month or two. Anderson, who has wrought such a big improvement in the United attack since he has been entrusted with the leadership, together with such stalwarts as West and Roberts, were absent through injuries and Meredith was away playing in his forty-first International match at Belfast. The players who filled their places proved but poor substitutes, and the result was that the game did not produce the closet content anticipated. The United were further handicapped in losing Turnbull just before the interval. It was in no sense a rough game, but still there were a surprising number of stoppages through injuries to player. Most of the players were undoubtedly suffering from the effect of the cup-ties, and they seemed to be particularly prone to being put one of action. Turnbull strained the muscles at the back of the thigh, Wall was troubled with pains in the back as the result of a cold, and Duckworth was injured through heading, the ball on the wrong part of his head. Davidson, the Everton outside left also off the field, for a brief period through a mishap to his ankle, and Beare was several times “in the wars.” But despite all this there was plenty of interesting football, and the visitors played better after they had lost Turnbull than in the early stage.

EVERTON MUCH THE STRONGER.
Everton's superiority was never in doubt. Their attack was much better balanced Browell distributing the play with good judgement, and the real cleverness shown in passing keeping the Manchester backs fully employed. Everton were also much stronger at half-back, but both rear lines of defence acquitted themselves well. Prior to the opening goal by Everton after a quarter of an hour's plays that United goal had several narrow escapes. A well-placed corner kick by Beare gave Wareing his opportunity for rushing up and heading into the net. At this period Beare and Jefferis delighted the crowd with their clever combined play. Bell was repeatedly beaten, but Stacey offered a stubborn resistance. Everton's second goal came shortly before the interval, and Browell before scoring with a hot shot had laid Hodge low. The United attack, although short of Turnbull, was seen to much better advantage in the second half. They played with greater dash and vigour, but at no period of the game did they show really effective combination. It was from a long kick by Stacey that Hamill darted clean past Macconnachie and scored with a grand shot, Caldwell making no attempt to save. The visitors joy, however, was short lived, a well combined movement by the Everton forwards ending in Jefferis recording his first goal of the season. In the closing stages the homesters continued to have the best of the argument, and Browell added a fourth goal. Teams: - Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (captain), backs, Harris, Wareing, and Grenyer, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, and Davidson, forwards. Manchester United: - Beale, goal, Hodge, and Stacey, backs, Duckworth, Whalley, and Bell, half-backs, Sheldson, Turnbull, Nuttall, Hamill, and Wall, forwards. Referee Mr. R. Eccles.

MANCHESTER UNITED RESERVES 2 EVERTON RESERVES 0
January 20, 1913. The Liverpool Courier.
CENTRAL LEAGUE
Everton Reserves, though strongly represented received a check at Old Trafford by 2 goals to nil. Hopper and Livingstone being the scorers. The Blues had their newest man, Stevens, at outside left, and Fleetwood at centre half, but the United are going great guns at the present time, and have won outright their last five games. Everton: - Bromilow, goal, Page, and Holbem, backs, Parker, Fleetwood, and Simpson, half-backs, Smith Brannick, Simms, Wright, and T. Stevens, forwards.

EVERTON IN SCORING MOOD.
January 20, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool
By the Critic.
Honours were even in the Liverpool-Manchester duel. The City were too fast for the Anfield half backs, and here in lay the whole trouble. At Goodison Park the Everton side held the advantage in all departments, but more particularly in the half-back line did the “Blues” stand on a higher plane than their opponents. The merit of otherwise of the middle line makes all the difference between success and failure.

Blues' Success.
It was unfortunate that the United were unable to field their full strength, and it was also regrettable that two of their players should have been forced to retire before the end of the game. Turnbull apparently stained his leg, and he did not turn out in the second half, whilst Wall went off before the end, and Duckworth also complained of slight concussion, the players remembering little or nothing of the last half-hour's play. Davidson, Everton's outside left, also retired injured, so that the match was married by quite a chapter of accidents. Fortunately none of the hurts were of a series character although sufficient to temporarily incapacitate the players experienced. Everton were decidedly the better team on the day's play, and deserved their success. Even when the United had their full eleven on the field the “Blues” were the smarter lot. It is satisfactory to note the improvement in front of goal. For months the Toffees have been unable to get beyond the two mark, but against Stockport they obtained five, and on Saturday they pierced the United net on four occasions, which shows the forwards to be in more sprightly vein. Tom Browell especially is showing better form than for some time past, and altogether the team is running smoothly.

Smart Half-Back Play.
The feature of the game on Saturday was the splendid efforts of the half-backs. As a line Harris, Wareing and Grenyer were perfect, the trio playing with rare judgement, and for the most part they were too good for the United forwards. Harris retains his pace and skid in surprising fashion, while Wareing is proving himself a really fine centre half, and the useful knack of scoring goals is an additional point in his favour. On the left, Grenyer's artistic touches, and general all round ability attracts the admiration of onlookers, and it is good evident that Everton have a tiptop half-back in this well built youth. The Blues are reaping the reward of perseverance's. It was an interesting game throughout, and even when short handed the United made great efforts, in fact their depleted forward line did much better in the second half than in the early portion of the game. The home front line did all that was asked of them. Beare got through some good work on the right, where I was also pleased to note that Frank Jefferis played better than he has done for some time, and I trust his first goal of the season has broken the spell of misfortune, which seems to have overshadowed his play. Browell is putting more vim into his work, and his first goal was a fine one. Bradshaw worked unceasingly, and was at times extremely clever, but Davidson was not seen to advantage. Stevenson was the better back. MaConnachie's display being uneven. He was at fault in letting Hamill in to score. On United side Hamill and Sheldon was the better wing. Hamill being very good in the second half. Hodge was the better back, and I thought Stacey was rather too forceful in dealing with Beare. Beale brought off some very fine saves, and Caldwell once tipped over the bar in clever fashion. It would seem that Everton's forces will be further strengthened by the inclusion at no distant date of Houston. The Irish International played well with Lacey on Saturday. Mr. W. C. Cuff, the Everton secretary paid a visit to Belfast for the purpose presumably, of completing arrangements with the Irish winger. Houston will appear in the Everton colours early in February. He is at present in Liverpool.

What Will Brighton Do?
Brighton, Everton's opponents in the next round of the Cup, were beaten rather easily on Saturday. It has been understood from the first that Everton had not originally offered any monetary inducement to Brighton to change the venue, and all depends on the Seasiders as to whether the game is to be played at Brighton or Goodison Park. The Seasiders approached Everton after the original letter, and Everton have no doubt guaranteed a certain amount as a share of the gate. The Brighton directors of course must study their own supporters, but at the same time they cannot lose sight of the fact that they will share in a bigger gate at Goodison than in Brighton.


BRIGHTON REFUSE TO VISIT GOODISON
January 21, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool
By the Critic.
Everton will play their tie in the second round of the cup with Brighton as the drew has decreed, and it is perhaps just as well that no bargaining for the change of venue should be brought to a successful issue. The Brighton, club directors held a meeting last night and decided to retain the right of playing the match on their own ground, and the decision was come to be made the minimum fee for admission one shilling. Everton it must be understood, did not make any monetary offer beyond the suggestion that there would be a good gate at the Park, but as was only reasonable to expect the Southerners had to study their own supporters and Everton will no doubt prove a big attraction down south. It is in the best interests of the competition that they should remain as they are. Mr. C. W. Cuff informed me this morning that he had received no offical antimation from Brighton, conveying their decision.

HAVE EVERTON GOT HOUSTON?
Dundee Courier - Wednesday 22 January 1913
There has been lot of chattering regarding Houston and Everton. This Irishman and soldier was booked by Everton months aoo, but since that date rumour has been rife all round the country that Houston would not play for Everton. He left Ireland Saturday night, and j is now living in Liverpool. That suggests that Everton have not lost, and are not likely to lose, their man.

EVERTON AND THE VILLA.
January 24, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool.
By the Critic.
In Liverpool, when a match between Everton and Aston Villa is mentioned, good class football is nearly always associated with the meeting. The same state of affairs exists in Birmingham. Midland enthusiast's respect the Everton club for they know full well they can be depended on to give a good account of themselves against the Claret and Blue. The meeting tomorrow at Aston is arousing great interest and a keen contest is assured. The Evertonians are all fit and the tussle with the Villa is likely to prove a good preliminary to the Cup battle on the following Saturday at Brighton. The teams will be: - Everton: - Caldwell; Stevenson and MaConnachie; Harris, Wareing, Grenyer; Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, Davidson. Aston Villa: - Hardy; Lyons, Weston; Whittaker, or Leach, Harrop, Barbor; Hall, Halse, Hampton, Stephenson, Bache. The “Express” will as usual be first in the field with complete reports and results of all-important encounters.

 

EVERTON

(Villa won 3-0 last season)

January 25, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool

“Blues” visit Aston Villa

Sparkling Play

Hampton Opens Scoring, and Beare Equalises.

Grand Game Ends in Draw

By Rover.

There are no more popular visitors to the Villa headquarters than the Everton team, and the meeting this afternoon of the two excited exception interest by reason of the manner in which both teams have recently been performing. It is was known that Everton have rarely fared well at Aston Park; still, the supporters of the Goodison Park brigade were fairly confident that on this occasion the Blues would make a bold bid for supremacy. Birmingham was reached shortly after midday, and, although the weather was on the dull side, there was a good lining of spectators at the enclosure when the teams stepped on the field. The teams faced in the following order: - - Aston Villa: - Hardy, goal, Lyons, and Weston, backs Barber, Harrop, and Leach, half-backs, Hall, Halse, Hampton, Stephenson and Bache, forwards. Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (captain), backs, Harris, Wareing, and Grenyer, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, and Davidson, forwards. Referee Mr. J. Fowler, Sunderland.

Even Conditions.

There would be about 16,000 spectators present when Hampton set the ball rolling for the Villa. There was no wind, and the players get about their work under even condition. The Villa were the first to make a move, and Hall looked like getting in a promising centre when MaConnachie forced him over the lines. Then Leach provided Hall and Bache with openings, but they came to nothing, and after the Villa's smart opening attack the Everton right responded in promising style. However, Beare came up against Weston, and the visitor's movements were cut short. For some time the Evertonians were seen to great advantage and a long pass from Browell to Beare looked like bringing about a tangible point when the outside man was easily dispossessed by Weston. Harrop set Bache on a promising mission, and the latter, after eluding Harris and Stevenson, put right across the goalmouth only to find Hall at fault at a fairly easy opening. The Villa maintained their advantage, and after a couple of onslaughts Halse sent in a low ground shot that Caldwell only partly saved, and it was fortunate that Stevenson narrowed in time to prevent Hampton from putting on the finishing touch.

Bradshaw Carried off.

Play was suspended owing to Bradshaw coming into collision with Lyons, and the Everton player was carried off the field. With Everton shorthanded, it was only to be expected that masters would not run too much their way. The Villa forwards made the most of the advantage, and four times swarmed round the Everton defence. Harrop put in one shot, which narrowly missed the mark, and it was a near thing when Grenyer handled within the penalty area, and Everton successfully claimed on the score of accident. A moment later MaConnachie took the ball from the foot of Hampton, and following this Caldwell was lucky in getting away the ball from Halse, after a partial clearance. At this point Bradshaw returned, and his re-appearance was signlised by an advance on the Villa quarters, but there was no getting the better of Barber and Harrop, who were stalwarts in breaking up tactics.

Hampton Scores

The Villa came again, and after Stephenson had the better of his namesake, in the race for possession the ball was placed for Hampton to dash in and score the opening goal of the match. This success came after play had been in progress half an hour. Getting to work again the Everton forwards were seen in better advantage than previously, and their clever footwork often brought them within the danger zone. Harrop was, however, always a force to be reckoned with, but eventually Beare put across a beauty, which Browell and Bradshaw in turn failed to take advantage of. The ball went for a corner, which Davidson accurately placed, but luck was not Everton's way, as Wareing's header just topped the bar. Then Grenyer made a good attempt to score, quite the best thus far, but it was intercepted by Lyons more by good luck than management.

Half-time Aston Villa 1 Everton 0

The first half had been spiritedly, and was fully appreciated by the crowd. The Villa halves were a stumbling block top the progress of the Everton forwards and in this respect none was more prominent than Harrop, who kept a watchful eye on the movements of Browell. When the second half opened there would be quite 30,000 spectators present. In the opening stages Everton defenders were hard pressed, but they came through the ordeal successfully, and it looked odds on Browell putting his side on level terms, when Weston luckily nipped in, taking the ball from his toes. Wareing was a prominent factor in placing his side in a good position, and, like Harrop, kept the opposing centre forward well subdued. The first dangerous shot came from Hall, but Caldwell cleared.

Lyon Disabled.

Following an onslaught on the Villa goal Lyons was temporarily disabled, and on play being resumed the Villa went way at a great pace, and as Wareing was penalised far too close attention to Hampton, matters looked serious for Everton. However, MaConnachie accounted for the free kick in great style by dispossessing Halse when favourably placed. In a trice the Blues' forwards, by dint of clever footwork, established themselves well in the Villa half. Here Harris provided Bradshaw with an opening, which looked like bringing about an equaliser, but the Evertonian was just inches out of his reckoning with a fast drive. Then Caldwell cleared from Halse and Hall with flying kicks, Harrop was injured, and had to retire, following which Everton attacked. Browell tested Hardy who partially saved when at fully length. The ball went to Beare, and the outside right

Drove Hard into the Net.

Final Result Aston Villa 1, Everton 1.

 

EVERTON RES V. STALYBRIDGE CELTIC

January 25, 1913. Evening express, Liverpool

Much interest was evinced in this match by the initial appearance at Goodison Park of Stevens, Everton's latest recruit. Makepeace, having recovered from his recent injury, was also having a “try out.” Teams: - Everton: - Hodge, goal; Page and Holbem, backs; Simpson, Browell (a) (captain), and Makepeace, half-backs; Smith, Brannick, Simms, Johnson and Stevens, forwards. Stalybridge: - Maskery, goal; Jackson and Peters, backs; Wilkinson, Eveason, and Duckworth, half-backs; Freeman, Watson, Smith (p), smith (a), and Hoppinstall, forwards.

There was a splendid attendance when the players commenced operations. Everton were on the aggressive and Stevens was

Early Prominent

With a well-judged centre, which Johnson secured and passed on to Brannick, who scored a very fine goal. Again the Blues advanced, and the Stalybridge goal, had a couple of narrow escapes from centres by smith. The visitors forwards were then in evident, and a smart attack on the home goal resulted in Smith (a) equalising with a short-range shot. Shortly afterwards Everton again took the lead, clever passing by the three inside men culminating in

Brannick Again

Finding the net. After the first few minutes very little was seen of the fair-haired Stevens. This was not his fault, however, for he was absolutely neglected, and was rarely given the ball. Freeman executed a fine run and centre which looked ominous for the homesters, but Makepeace judged the situation to a nicety and nipped in and removed the danger in a remarkably clever manner. In another attack on the Stalybridge goal Brannick had an almost perfect change, but to the consternation of the spectators he shot

Ridiculously Wide.

When about three yards from goal. At length Stevens got a chance to show his ability, the result being that he sent in a very fine centre, which Maskerry managed with difficulty to punch clear. Another fine centre was sent across by Stevens, and although Simms got his head clear to the ball, Maskerry punched clear. Half-time Everton 2 Stalybridge 1.

 

ASTON VILLA 1 EVERTON 1 (Game 801)

January 27, 1913. The Liverpool Courier.

HONOURS EVEN AT ASTON.

TWO CLEVER SIDES.

Games between Everton and Aston Villa are invariably productive of good sport, and Saturday's contest between these old rivals at Aston Park was no exception to the general rule. On the run of the play the Villa were, perhaps, just a shade the better of two really good sides, by reason of the fact that their forwards were the more sprightly, but the superiority was not sufficiently pronounced as to warrant any other result than a division of the spoils. The Villa were unfortunate in losing the services of the ex-Anfielders, Harrop, as it was during his absence that the Evertonians drew level and then enjoyed the greater share of the play. Harrap's injury was most regrettable. In attempting to head a ball, which Wareing was hooking, into goal, the Villa centre-half met the full impact of Wareing's boot, with the result that his check bone was smashed. As the unfortunate players admitted it was pure accident, and the sympathies of his comrades and all who witnessed the incident go out to him, as his injury will probably keep him out of the game for some time.

STERLING HALF-TIME PLAY.

Narrowest down to a fine point, the contest received itself into a test of skill between two brilliant half-back lines, who showed a ready appreciation of the requirements of their respective forwards. Where Harrop kept Browell well under control and compelled him to part, so also did Wareing with regard to Hampton, with the result that individual effort had perforce to give way to those concerted movements that delight the hearts of the football spectators. And this was not the exception, but the rule, and the thirty odd thousand folk that lined the enclosure most as the close of the game, has felt that they had spent a most profitable afternoon. There were frequent stoppages for minor injuries, but these were rather the result of keen endeavour than of vigorous intention. By their open swinging passes during the first 20 minutes of the game the Villa appeared to have the issue in their grasp, and probably the adoption of these methods would have benefited the Evertonians to more useful purpose. The Blues, however, put up a stolid defence, and as the play simmered down to an exhibition of the best to be had in close passing movements there was little, if anything between the teams.

PLAY AND PLAYERS.

The game had been in progress 35 minutes when Hampton crowned a skillful movement in which Leach Stephenson, and Halse had taken part, and it was by this point that the Villa led at the interval. During the second portion the Evertonians showed to better advantage, and an equally skilful movement to that which led up to Beare completed the Villa scoring, after hardy had brought about a partial clearance from Browell. Against clever half-backs both forward lines had all their work cut out in order to make an impression upon the defence. As indicated Browell was fairly well held up, and was rarely able to get in an effective shot, and the same remark fits the case of Hampton opposed to whom was Wareing at his best. Still both centre-forwards opened out the play and in Everton's case the extreme wingmen responded in able fashion. On the Villa side Stephenson and Bache, who were splendidly supported by Leach, were the most successful of the forwards, and some of their egorts only failed by the merest margin. Grenyer and Harris maintained their reputations, and Macconnachie, and Stevenson allowed no quarter. Caldwell was twice faulty in his anticipation, and it was fortunate for the visitors that the Villa marksmen were off the target. The Villa defence was sound, with Hardy as resourceful as ever in goal and both teams fully merited the applause of the spectators at the close of a hard fast and capital game. Teams: - Aston Villa: - Hardy, goal, Lyons, and Weston, backs Barber, Harrop, and Leach, half-backs, Hall, Halse, Hampton, Stephenson and Bache, forwards. Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (captain), backs, Harris, Wareing, and Grenyer, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, and Davidson, forwards. Referee Mr. J. Fowler, Sunderland.

 

EVERTON RESERVES 5 STALYBRIDGE CELTIC 2

January 27 1913. The Liverpool Courier.

CENTRAL LEAGUE (Game 24)

With a strong side, which included Makepeace, Fleetwood, and their latest acquisition, Stevens Everton easily overcame Stalybridge by 5 goals to 2. The Blues were a much more scientific side. At times they simply toyed with their opponents and if it had not been for an extraordinary display of goalkeeping on the part of Muskey. Everton's score might have reached double figure. Brannick was the most successful forward in the home team, but Stevens at times showed flashes of brilliant play, though he was poorly served, and for the most part had to wait for the ball which rarely came. Makepeace and Fleetwood were prominent figures in the defence, and they also rendered valuable assistance to his men in front. Brannick (3), Johnson, and Stevens, were the scorers for Everton, while Smith and Evenslen netted for Stalybridge . Everton: - Hodge, goal, Page and Holbem, backs, Simpson, Fleetwood, and Makepeace, half-backs, Smith, Brannick, Simms, Johnson, and Stevens, forwards.

 

AN OLD TIME DISPLAY

January 27, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool

Everton and Aston Villa gave one of their old time display, the game being described as a perfect exhibition, and the only pity was that Harrop should have sustained such a serious injury. On the run of the play the Villa were, perhaps just a shade the better of the too really good sides, by reason of the fact that their forwards were the more sprightly, but the superiority was not sufficiently pronounced as to warrant any other result than a division of the spoils. The Villa were unfortunate in losing the services of the ex-Anfielder Harrop as it was during his absence that the Evertonians drew level and then enjoyed the greater share of the play. Harrop's injury was most regrettable. In attempting to hold a ball which Wareing was hooking into goal the Villa centre-half met the full impact of Wareing's boot, with the result that his check bone was smashed. As the unfortunate player admitted in was a pure accident, and the sympathies of his comrades and all who witnessed the incident go out to him, as his injury will probably keep him out of the game for some time.

Sterling Half-Back Play.

Narrowed down to a fine point, the contest resolved itself into a test of skill between two brilliant half-back lines, who showed a ready appreciation of the requirement of their respective forwards. Where Harrop kept Browell well under control and complied him to part, so also did Wareing with regard to Hampton, with the result that individual effort had perforce to give way to those concerted movements that delight the heart of the football spectators. And this was not the exception, but the rule, and the thirty odd thousand folk that lined the enclosure must, at the c lose of the game, have felt that they had spent a most profitable afternoon. There were frequent stoppages for minor injuries, but these were rather the result of keen endeavour than of vigorous intention. By their open swinging passes during the first 20 minutes of the game the Villa appeared to have the issue in their grasp, and probably the adoption of these methods would have benefited the Evertonians to more useful purpose. The Blues, however, put up a stolid defence, and as the play simmered down to an exhibition of the best to be had in close passing movements there was little, if anything, between the teams.

Clever Players.

Against clever half-backs both forwards lines had all their work cut out in order to make an impression upon the defences. As indicated Browell was fairly well held up, and was rarely able to get in an effective shot, and the same remarks fits the case of Hampton opposed to whom was Wareing at his best. Still both centre forwards opened out the play, and in Everton's case the extreme wingmen responded in a able fashion. On the Villa side Stephenson and Bache, who were splendidly supported by Leach, were the most successful of the forwards and some of their efforts only failed by the merest margin. Grenyer and Harris maintained their reputations, and MaConnachie and Stevenson allowed no quarter Caldwell was twice faulty in his anticipation, and I was fortunate for the visitors that the Villa marksmen were off the target. The Villa defence was sound, with Hardy as resourceful as ever in goal, and both teams fully merited the applause of the spectators at the close of a hard, fast, and capital game.

 

EVERTON AS BEFORE

January 29, 1913. Evening Express, Liverpool

The Goodison Park club had no hesitation in choosing the eleven which did so well at Aston; indeed I do not suppose the “Blues” could place a stronger team in the field than that which has been selected viz; Caldwell; Stevenson, MaConnachie; Harris, Wareing, Grenyer; Beare Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, Davidson. The main strength of the Brighton team lays in the half-back line, and if the Everton forwards can get the better of Booth, McGhie and Highan, they should command the situation. The “Blues” are bound to be watched very closely, however,

Joe Leeming's View.

An “Express” representative was just in the middle of an interesting interview with Mr. J. Robson, the Seasiders manager, when the Brighton players returned from a long country walk. They certainly look a likely lot of fellows, but very few of them were prepared to talk football. Leeming, the captain, however, was an exception, and, in reply to my question of their chances, Leeming said, “I think we stand an excellent chance of wining.” The playing of the match at Brighton,” added the skipper “is all in our favour, and Everton will quickly discover that they will have to play extremely well to succeed.” Leeming went on to say that he knew the Everton ground, and he considered the Lancashire players would be troubled with the pitch at Brighton, because it was both smaller and faster than the Everton one, making it more difficult to keep the ball in play. The Brighton captain concluded his remark by adding that Everton are undoubtedly a clever team than Brighton, but they would probably find the Southern League teams could give them points in the half-back line if the Southerners played up to form. Mr. Robson the manager, was hardly so optimistic, but he felt certain that they would provide the First Leaguers with a good game, and make them play their hardest before they could claim a victory. The Brighton manager is not a believer in special training, unless you can send the men away for a fortnight, and he is personally superintending the preparation of his team at home. It will be remembered that Brighton defeated Portsmouth in the opening round of the Cup, which is their first away success of the season. At home, however, they have played constantly well, as the following figures will show: -

Played 11, won 8, Lost 1, Drawn 2, For 24, Against 9

The Players.

Their performances at home stamp them as being a well balanced team, but it must be taken into account that several of these games were won before Smith was transferred to Bradford in December, and since the latter's departure Brighton have not been nearly the successful side they were. In fact they are still without a reliable centre-forward, which is causing some anxiety in selecting the men to oppose Everton on Saturday. Only last week against Meftover Needham started the game as leader of the attack, but was so unsuccessful that after the interval he changed places with Miller. On thee wing Needham gave a sparkling display, and in view of Goodwin's recent loss of form I should not be surprised if Needham should retain the place with Muir again in the centre. It is generally recognised that Brighton proposes an exceptionally fine half back line, and all three can command plenty of weight. Booth, the right half, has for some seasons been one of the best players in the position in the South. Several times he has been selected to play in international trial games, and as late as ten days ago played for England against the North on the Manchester City ground. Booth would in all probability have got his cap but for Ben Warren and then Ducat being in such good form. McShie the centre half, always plays a keen, vigorous game and he is quietly looking forward to opposing Browell. Higham on the left obtained his place in the team when Haworth was transferred to Middlesbrough, and he has never preformed better than in recent games.

A Wonderful Veteran.

The most extraordinary feature of the Brighton defence is the wonderful form, which Leeming continues to show. The Brighton captain is spending his fifth season in the Southern league and previously he assisted Bury for ten seasons, but although Leeming is now a veteran and a good deal slower than he was his generalship is worth a lot to Brighton. Leeming will have a youngster for a partner in Spencer, owing to Routridge still being unfit, but during the latter's absence Spencer has played many fine games and under Leeming's guidance he has become quite a steady back, who tackles cleanly and uses more judgement in his kicking than when he first came into the team. Whitting of course needs to introduction as a goalkeeper, but the forwards are of doubtful ability. They are all clever players individually, but there is a general lack of understanding about their methods that may make the work of the Everton defence easy. Longstaff on the extreme right is a winger with plenty of pace, and he learned his football in the Country, Simpson the inside right, came from Bradford in exchange for Smith, and he has done useful work for the Seasiders since he joined them six weeks ago. Webb the inside left was once an amateur who played for the Bohemians, and has also represented Ireland in International games. Webb is an artistic footballer and a clever opportunist. Although nothing definite has been settled about the Brighton team, I should not be surprised to see the following oppose Everton: - Whiting (goal); Spencer and Leeming (backs); Booth, McGhee, and Highan (half-backs); Longstaff, and Simpson (right wing), Miller (centre forward); Webb and Needham (left wing), with just a possibility of Goodwin coming in for the latter at the last minute.

 

 

 

January 1913