Everton Independent Research Data

 

SAGAR SAVES PENALTY
June 1, 1940. The Evening Express
Everton’s Game At Old Trafford.
By Pilot.
Tom Jones was able to assist Everton at Old Trafford against Manchester United in the concluding regional match. Everton: - Sagar (captain), goal; Jackson and Greenhalgh, backs; Mercer, Jones (T), and Watson, half-backs; Lindley, Bentham, Lawton, Stevenson, and Boyes, forwards. Manchester United: - Goodall (Bury), goal; Redwood and Gemmill (Bury), backs; Jones (J.) (Everton), Briggs and Manley (Brentford), half-backs; Matthews (Stoke City), Herd, Burdett (Bolton Wanderers), Doherty (Manchester City), and Carter (Bury), forwards. Referee Mr. J. B. Williams (Cheshire). United were a more effective side, but attacks broke down in the penalty area, due mainly to the keen anticipation of Jones. Everton claimed two successive corners in a game producing an abundance of clever constructive football, and Stevenson, breaking through to Lawton’s pass, found Goodall safe. In seven minutes, Jackson accidentally handled a centre from carter and the referee awarded a penalty, Herd took this placing hard and low to Sagar’s right, but Sagar dived to make an excellent clearance. This is the second Saturday in succession Sagar has saved a penalty. Everton almost got ahead when Lindley cut through from Lawton’s pass and placed low across goal, but the ball travelled just a little too fast for the in-running Lawton. Sagar and Tom Jones, figured in a mix-up, but Carter was hardly lively enough in accepting a half chance, and when next Carter got through he placed straight to Sagar. Herd was also guilty of faulty shooting, before Lawton headed inches wide from Lindley’s centre. Mercer damaged his nose in a collision, but was able to continue. Everton gradually took a grip of the proceedings, their forwards playing with marked accuracy. Watson sent in a fast low centre which Lindley hit first time, only to see the ball fly over the top. Stevenson’s fast burst through was frustrated by Goodall. Herd was given a good opportunity, but one again his direction was faulty. Everton were almost continually on the attack. Lawton twice went close with headers before Goodall went full length to fist away from Bentham, Lawton beat three men before placing outside. Then Mercer joined the attack and sent in a right-foot shot which Goodall saved brilliantly. There had been much good football in this game. Matthews again found his master in Greenhalgh, who did not give the international a chance. Lawton continued with another good run, but the pace of the ball beat him as he was shaping for his shot.
Half-Time; Manchester United 0, Everton 0.

EVERTON JUN V. LIVERPOOL JUN
June 1, 1940. The Evening Express.
The challenge match at Goodison Park produced good football in midfield, but both sides were weak near goal. Good ball control by Pickstock led to a corner, but this, like several others forced by Liverpool, came to nothing. Sumner neatly tricked Rafferty, and centred accurately, but Brownhill in the Liverpool goal made a safe clearance.

THIRD TEAM IN EIGHT DAYS.
June 1, 1940. The Liverpool Echo.
Doherty Plays For United.
Everton Escapes.
Everton: - Sagar (captain), goal; Jackson and Greenhalgh, backs; Mercer, Jones (T), and Watson, half-backs; Lindley, Bentham, Lawton, Stevenson, and Boyes, forwards. Manchester United: - Goodall (Bury), goal; Redwood and Gemmill (Bury), backs; Jones (J.) (Everton), Briggs and Manley (Brentford), half-backs; Matthews (Stoke City), Herd, Burdett (Bolton Wanderers), Doherty (Manchester City), and Carter (Bury), forwards. Referee Mr. J. B. Williams (Cheshire). United had many “gusts” in their side against Everton, and one of them Doherty, has been seen in three different colours in the last eight days. He played for his own side last Saturday, Liverpool on Wednesday, and for the City’s neighbours today. It was a lethargic opening, but United’s units soon began to play like a machine without producing the necessary devil in their finishing to make progress. They should certainly have scored when Jackson decided to handle a centre by Carter in the early stages when standing in the penalty area. Herd, usually a sure shot, hit the ball hard from the “spot” but Sagar moved to the right and took the ball to his body for a grand save. Sagar once lost possession with carter at hand, but the mistake was not costly when Jones crowded out the young boy’s determined bow-at-a-venture shot. Everton showed promise in several attacks, but the ball did not run kindly for them until Lindley provided a centre from which Lawton all but succeeded with a header. A solid drive by Watson was flicked five yards from goal by Lindley, but through Goodall could hardly have made a save against such a deflection, the ball curled high over the bar. The Matthews-Greenhalgh duel was continued and as before Matthews did not have it all his own way. Whenever Greenhalgh failed there was usually Watson or Boyes to take up the challenge.
Lawton’s Trick.
Sagar was beaten by a placed shot by Burditt, but the ball swung outside. Another Everton escape came when Tom Jones was forced to put Herd’s shot over his own bar. One of the few minor names in this match of much talent, Briggs, a reserve player, challenged comparison with others, but Tom Lawton got him and others running the wrong way, and would have got a picture goal if he had kept his shot low. Lawton made one particularly good effort to retrieve a ball right across the face of goal, and Goodall did his best work when he pushed round the post a left-foot shot from Mercer, who had got over a blow on the nose and was starting to play his customary game.
Half-Time; Manchester United 0, Everton 0.

RAPID HAT-TRICK FOR STEVENSON
June 3, 1940. The Liverpool Daily Post
Manchester United 0, Everton 3
Everton Win at Manchester.
By L.E.E
One of the smallest, but most able footballers, Alec Stevenson, failed by an inch or two or achieves an everlasting distinction at Manchester. Four Minutes from the end he scored in the same breath as it were and within the space of another minute he all but registered the quickest hat-trick on record. His third shot was half-held by Goodall and was crossing the line when he made a pounce for the ball and saved the day. So Stevenson had to be content with getting the hat-trick in four and not two minutes. He obtained a final goal right on time, and Everton won 3-0. Right up to Stevenson’s hat-trick of goals this seemed destined to be a goalless game. The centre half, Briggs a youngster in the teens and a reserve player into a bargain, rather showed up some of the famous feet that pattered alongside. Without any attempt at polish, he got great effect against Tom Lawton and others simply through sheer tenacity. It was not his fault his side lost 3-0.
Fine Football.
Actually I doubt whether Everton were worth such a solid success. United, with many guests, played well, if without the punch one expects with a vital League game in normal times. It was a grand exhibitionist football, including wonderful individual work at various times. Sagar, for instance saved Herd’s penalty shot –the missing of this probably cost the losers the match –and Mercer once he recovered from a blow on the nose, made it his business to close the Doherty channel down as much as possible. Greenhalgh always had willing assistance from half-back and forwards in his duel with Mathews, but this juggler of footballs was not nearly so often in the picture here as he is when Stoke colleagues ply the ball his way. For a level of excellence, with emphasis on the idea that football is a team game. Watson is hard to beat, Jones used his short, simple pass that got the defence out of trouble. The Doherty-Herd-Burdett inside combination offered many opportunities for the leader., Burdett, who appears to be a very useful type. Manley, Briggs and Redwood were others of United who showed up well. Everton: - Sagar (captain), goal; Jackson and Greenhalgh, backs; Mercer, Jones (T), and Watson, half-backs; Lindley, Bentham, Lawton, Stevenson, and Boyes, forwards. Manchester United: - Goodall (Bury), goal; Redwood and Gemmill (Bury), backs; Jones (J.) (Everton), Briggs and Manley (Brentford), half-backs; Matthews (Stoke City), Herd, Burdett (Bolton Wanderers), Doherty (Manchester City), and Carter (Bury), forwards. Referee Mr. J. B. Williams (Cheshire).

THE CUPS.
June 3, 1940. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log.
Everton holders of the Liverpool Senior Cup have a chance of adding the Lancashire Senior Cup to their sideboard collection. They oppose Bury in the final at Gigg lane on Saturday –last day of the season. On the same day, at Wembley Blackburn Rovers will endeavour to bring the League War Cup to Lancashire at the expense of West Ham (Beat Fulham 4-3). I think Everton can beat Bury. They conquered Manchester United on Saturday in no uncertain fashion –and Alex Stevenson just failed to make history. The little Irishman a hat-trick in the space of six minutes –great work. It might have been three in two –the fastest hat-trick ever. He got his first two goals in a minute and then streaked through again to send in a low cross shot. Goodall just managed to touch the ball, which ran along the goal-line until Redwood desperately kicked it away. Features of the game –apart from a fine scoring spate –were the manner in which once again Norman Greenhalgh mastered Stanley Matthews and Sagar’s penaly save. Norman never gave Stanley a chance, Sagar came to the rescue with his penalty clearance early on when the United were masters. Later, the Blues called the tune in a delightful game, productive of all that one finds in football’s copy book, and with thrills abounding. Everton won 3-0. Doherty, Redwood, Manley and Briggs were the United’s best, and the way in which 18-years-old Briggs –produce of the United’s “A” team –stuck to Lawton was excellent. Lindley had his best game of the season –at outside-right. In an Everton attack which allowed the better understanding. Lindley outshone Matthews in effectiveness. Bentham was the chief initiator and a half-back. Watson had no superior, although Tom Jones and Mercer kept a tight grip on the United attacking stars. Jackson played well late on Stevenson came into the game at the crucial moment with its winning goals, but Boyes has been more assertive. Everton’s Chairman Mr. Andrew Coffey, and Secretary Mr. Theo Kelly, were accompanied by the new Liverpool County F.A. secretary Mr. Ike Robinson.

“STEVIE’S” GOOD WORK.
June 3, 1940. The Liverpool Echo
Ranger’s Notes
Alec Stevenson, of Everton, was within inches of creating a quick-scoring record at Manchester. He nearly got a hat-trick in two minutes. Goodall half stopped the shot which would have brought a third goal and then as that ball was about to cross the line he flung himself at it and saved the situation. As it happened Stevenson was not to be denied a hat-trick and he got his third goal in the last minute. If it was not a rousing game it was certainly a very attractive one, with much good exhibition football and none of the displays of temper we sometimes get when anything vital is at stake in normal times. United, with many guests, blended well, and but for Sagar’s grand goalkeeping, which included a penalty save from Herd and Tom Jones’s characteristic coolness under pressure. Everton would have been three goals down, not three goals to the good. As it was the game was goalless, and seemed destined to finish so, when four minutes from the end Stevenson came to life. Not least outstanding was Briggs, a well-built sturdy reservist, who stood between Lawton and goals and showed himself to be a player of promises. He is only in the teens, but there was no indication here that he was a minnow among many big fish. Watson’s club spirit and Greenhalgh’s grip of Stan Matthews, who was not as busy as he might have been were other points that did not escape the eye.

EVERTON’S TEAM FOR CUP FINAL.
June 4, 1940. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log
Everton for their Lancashire Senior Cup final against Bury at Gigg Lane on Saturday, hope to field the team which conquered Manchester United on Saturday. Lindley’s display against the United was something of an eye-opener. He always strove to do the correct things, and for once in a while luck was with him in that his efforts bore fruit. Lindley, in many games, has been what I would describe as a “luckless player.” It was his quick thought and action that enabled Everton to gain the first –and vital –goal on Saturday. Everton; Sagar; Jackson, Greenhalgh; Mercer, Jones (Tom), Watson; Lindley, Bentham, Lawton, Stevenson, Boyes.

EVERTON-BURY “RUBBER.”
May 4, 1940. The Liverpool Echo.
Ranger’s Notes.
The meeting of Everton and Bury at Gigg Lane on Saturday, in the final of the Lancashire Senior Cup, is a “rubber” affair. Each has beaten the other once in previous finals, while Bury have won the trophy five times, and Everton four. Everton hope to have their strongest side out, the probable’s being; Sagar; Jackson, Greenhalgh; Mercer, Jones, Watson; Lindley, Bentham, Lawton, Stevenson, Boyes. Everton “C” play St. Elizabeth, in the last match in the Bootle J.O.C. league at Goodison Park tomorrow night (7 o’clock). On Saturday there is an attractive fixture with the famous Mujac (Manchester United Juniors) at Goodison Park. The two previous meetings between the teams have produced excellent games. Walter Boyes, the Everton winger who is sports organiser for convalescent soldier at – a Liverpool hospital, has appeared to me for badminton shuttlecocks. Who will oblige? Please send them to me here.

RENTON STALWART PASSES
Daily Record - Wednesday 05 June 1940
Another of the great old-timers has passed out.  Andrew Hannah, who has died in Clydebank, was one of the famous Renton team which gained the proud title of Champions of the World. As right back, played for the Scottish League in the first match against the English League, in 1892, at Holton. Referee was the late John Bentley, who said it was the cleanest game he had ever seen—he did not have to award a single free kick.  As an Anglo-Scot, Andrew Hannah captained Everton during three seasons, and he was a stalwart in the Liverpool team, Everton’s greatest rivals of the time. A noted athlete, he won numerous prizes at Highland games, his forte being the hop, step and leap, at which he had done 49 feet.

ANDREW HANNAH PASS AWAY
Daily Record, 5 June - 1940.
Another of the great old-timers has passed out. Andrew Hannah, who has died in Clydebank, was one of the famous Renton team which gained the proud title of Champions of the World. As right back, he played for the Scottish League in the first match against the English League, in 1892, at Bolton. Referee was the late John Bentley, who said it was the cleanest game he had ever seen he did not have to award a single free kick.

As an Anglo-Scot, Andrew Hannah captained Everton during three seasons, and he was a stalwart in the Liverpool team, Everton's greatest rivals of the time. A noted athlete, he won numerous prizes at Highland games, his forte being the hop, step and leap, at which he had done 49 feet.

GOODISON FINALE
June 6, 1940. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log
A fair-haired young player named Briggs gave a splendid display for Manchester United against international Tommy Lawton at Old Trafford last Saturday. When I required about him I was told that it was his first home game with the United senior side that he was 18 and was a product of the United junior side which plays under the name of the Mujacs. “And we have plenty of other lads equally as promising in our Mujacs team at the moment,” said Secretary Mr. Walter Crickmer. Merseyside enthusiasts will be able to see for themselves on Saturday, for the Mujac are appearing at Goodison Park in opposition to Everton Juniors –champs of the Bootle J.O.C League. The match is at 3.30 p.m., and it should prove a grand finale for the season 1939-40 at Goodison Park. The sides met twice last year and each gained a success. Two newcomers –discoveries of Tuesday’s trial game at Goodison –will be included in the Everton team. They are Barlow, a 14 year-old right half from Gwlady’s street school, who was born within a few yards of Goodison Park, and Steele, a 16-year-old outside-right who has been playing with St. Leonard’s Boys Club, Bootle. Mr. Theo Kelly, the Everton secretary is much impressed by them. At outside-right will be Harry Cooke. He works on the ground staff. All the Everton players except two are under 17. Everton; Morris; Ireland, Dugdale; Barlow, Morris, Kieran; Cooke, Owen, Powell, Lyon, Steele.

EVERTON AND BLUE LANCASHIRE CUP RECORDS
June 6, 1940. The Liverpool Echo
Goodison “B” Newcomers
Ranger’s Notes.
I don’t know whether the same high level of efficiently and organising ability characterises the occupants of the secretarial seats of other county F.A.’s, but certainly in Lancashire we have been fortunate in our officials. The late Mr. Jimmy Grant, of revered memory, was one of the best ever always courteous and helpful, and in appointing Mr. Ike Robinson as his success the Liverpool County F.A. have a man of energy and ability who will guide their destinies aright from his fund of practical experience. The Lancashire F.A. is just as fortunate in the possession of Mr. Fred Hargreaves, in the secretarial chair from whom I have received a cheery hole regarding Saturday’s Lancashire Senior Cup final between Everton and Bury at Bury. There is too much in it to use in full in these days of paper shortage, but some of the facts are so interesting that I have summarised them as follows:- Bury have won the Lancashire Cup five times –in 1892, 1899, 1903 (when they beat Everton 1-0 at Bury), 1906 and 1926. Four of their five wins have been on opponents grounds. While the average gate receipts when Bury won were £250 a match, on the three occasions they have been defeated in the final they drew well over £1,000 at each game. In 1901 Bury and Blackburn Rovers met five times in a Lancashire Cup-tie before they reached a decision, Rovers eventually winning after four drawn games and a total playing time of eight and a half hours.
Everton’s Lancashire Cup record is also a good one for they have won the trophy on four occasions, having beaten Bolton (1894), Manchester City (1897), Blackburn Rovers (1910), and Bury (1935). The Cup is one of the most handsome in the country having cost £160 way back in 1879, so I reckon it should be worth well over doubt that these days. Gold medals are presented to both competing sides, and there may be a bonus for the winners as well, though at the moment, that is in the melting pot. The Football league has forbidden the clubs to pay it, but the Lancashire authorities are not content to leave the matter there, and are fighting it out before the F.A. itself.
Stars of The Future.
Those who saw the previous game between Everton’s junior side and Manchester’s United’s hopefuls will need no telling that the repeat performance at Goodison Park this Saturday will be worth seeing. The kick off is 3.30 and Everton’s team will include two youngsters who must be bursting with pride at their inclusion. They are Barlow and Steele, right half and outside left. Both these lads went up to Goodison for a private trial game on Tuesday –the last until next season –and did so well that Mr. Kelly has included them in Saturday’s team, though they have never donned an Everton jersey before. Powell the centre forward, is a son of the Witton Albion chairman and is still at school, at Northwich. Outside right Cooke, is the grandson of Trainer Harry Cooke. Everton team follows with ages in patentheses. Morris (15), Ireland (16), Dugdale (16), Barlow (17), Miller (17), Kieran (17), Cooke (15), Owen (17), Powell (15), Lyons (16), Steele (16).

COUNTY FINAL.
June 7, 1940. The Evening Express.
Merseyside interest will be centred more on the Lancashire Senior Cup final at Gigg Lane, I expect to see Everton succeed at the expense of Bury in a game which should attract at least a £1,000 gate. There will be on bonus for the game. This is now definite, for the Football Association have backed up the Football League who placed a ban on the payment of extra reward. Rochdale provide the form guide to this game. Bury were knocked out of the League Cup by Rochdale, who then went under to Everton. This indicates success for Everton tomorrow, but much depends on the constition of the side. Mr. Kelly is hopeful that all the selected will be available including Tommy Jones. In opposition will be two former Everton players –George Bradshaw, the goalkeeper, and Peter Dougal the inside-left. I expect to see a really thrilling finale to the season. Everton; Sagar; Jackson, Greenhalgh; Mercer, Jones (Tom), Watson; Lindley, Bentham, Lawton, Stevenson, Boyes. Bury: - Bradshaw; Robinson, Gemmill; Livingstone, McGowan, Halton; Jones, Davies, Burdett, Dougal, Carter.
• Challenge Match Tomorrow at Goodison Park Everton juniors v Mujacs (Manchester United Juniors). Kick-off 3.30 Match No 48. Usual prices of admission.

EVERTON AT BURY
June 7, 1940. The Liverpool Echo
Ranger’s Notes.
Everton hope to be strongly represented, but they will find Bury a big proposition on their own ground, where they have done exceptionally well all season. The Shakers side will include two former Evertonians in goalkeeper Bradshaw and inside left Dougal. I think Everton can lift the trophy provided they are at full strength and the forwards will remember the need for first-time shooting. Probable teams: - Everton; Sagar; Jackson, Greenhalgh; Mercer, Jones (Tom), Watson; Lindley, Bentham, Lawton, Stevenson, Boyes. Bury: - Bradshaw; Robinson, Gemmill; Livingstone, McGowan, Halton; Jones, Davies, Burdett, Dougal, Carter.

EVERTON IN THE LEAD.
June 8, 1940. The Evening Express.
After Early Bury Goal.
By Pilot.
Everton were without Mercer for the Lancashire Senior Cup Final against Bury at Gigg Lane, today. Mercer was engaged on military duties. Lindley, who tells me his joining up next week, moved to right half and Sumner, the Skelmersdale amateur, was at outside right. Everton: - Sagar (captain), goals; Jackson and Greenhalgh, backs; Lindley, Jones (Tom), and Watson, half-backs; Sumner, Bentham, Lawton, Stevenson and Boyes, forwards. Bury: - Bradshaw, goal; Robinson and Gemmill, backs; Livingstone, McGowan, and Halton, half-backs; Jones, Davies, Burdett, Dougal and Carter, forwards. Referee; Mr. P. Snape (Swinton). Bury opened with some neat forward work, but the Everton defence did not yield an inch, and the Blues were much more dangerous when they got moving. Bentham broke through and passed quickly for Sumner to beat Gemmill and shoot against the side netting. Boyes, showing fine speed, made a quick pass to Lawton, whose shot was saved by Bradshaw. Bury took the lead in seven minutes through Burdett. Sagar had fisted away from Carter, and before he could get back into goal Jones had slipped the ball back along the floor to Burdett to shoot through. Everton developed well on the left where Boyes always constituted a menace in a game played at surprising speed. It was a brilliant move between Stevenson and Boyes which led to the equaliser in sixteen minutes. The pair interchanged position cleverly, and when Boyes was hursting through for the final thrust he was brought down by Halton, and Lawton scored from the penalty. Everton had a narrow escape when from Carter’s corner Burdett headed against the bar, and twice Sagar had to run out to clear from the lively Burdett. Sumner was revealing good form on the Everton right and twice he outwitted Gemmill cleverly, but the Bury defence was perfect in its covering and few shooting chances accrued. Everton took the lead in 31 minutes with a splendid headed goal by Bentham. He had forced a corner on the left and he was there to leap high to Boyes’ corner kick and head into the far corner of the net.
Half-Time; Bury 1, Everton 2.

EVERTON IN LANCS CUP FINAL AT BURY
June 8, 1940. The Liverpool Echo
By Stork.
Everton: - Sagar (captain), goals; Jackson and Greenhalgh, backs; Lindley, Jones (Tom), and Watson, half-backs; Sumner, Bentham, Lawton, Stevenson and Boyes, forwards. Bury: - Bradshaw, goal; Robinson and Gemmill, backs; Livingstone, McGowan, and Halton, half-backs; Jones, Davies, Burdett, Dougal and Carter, forwards. Referee; Mr. P. Snape (Swinton). There was only a moderate attendance at the final of the Lancashire Senior Cup at Gigg Lane. Everton had to make changes, Mercer has returned to the South, so that Lindley went to the half-back line, and Sumner came in on the wing. Bury started off on a strong note, but Everton had the better chance when Boyes ran down the centre and offered Lawton a grand opportunity which he took, Bradshaw the former Everton goalkeeper, making a smart save. Bury’s reply was a grand run by Jones on the right wing, but he delayed his shot, so the Everton goal escaped. Bury had been pretty well kept in check, but a free kick against Everton led to their undoing for in seven minutes Bury had scored through Burdett there being a slackness about the Everton defence, Sagar being out of goal as the ball flew into the net. Everton equalised in fifteen minutes as a result of a penalty, Lawton scoring. The work of Boyes and Stevenson which led up to Halton bringing down Boyes, was as nice a piece of work as I have seen. Boyes seemed certain to score had he not been fouled. Bury had desperate luck when a header by Burdett bumped against the crossbar, with the Everton defence plainly beaten. Bury were inclined to miss their chances, whereas Everton accepted their gladly, and at 32 minutes they took the lead with a beautifully headed goal by Bentham. He glided Boyes’ corner kick right away from the Bury goalkeeper. Jones had a great chance of equalising for having worked out a grand opening he hooked the ball outside. From a free kick Davies tried to head away from Sagar and almost accomplished the feat, the Everton goalkeeper saving at the post. Half-Time; Bury 1, Everton 2.

EVERTON GAIN THE LANCASHIRE CUP
June 10, 1940. The Liverpool Daily Post
Bury 2, Everton 4
Bury’s Hard Fight
By Stork.
Everton had to fight every inch of the way to win the Lancashire Senior Cup at Gigg Lane, for Bury put up a magnificent fight for an hour when a Lawton goal, which came at a critical moment of the game, took all the heart out of the North Western champions. Up to that point they had been the more menacing side; in fact they appeared likely to run out winners of a game in which there was any amount of stern football. Everton at the interval led by a goal. A penalty goal by Lawton and a magnificent header by Bentham offset Burdett’s goal, which came in seven minutes. Bury strove might and main to break up the stern Everton defence, in which Jones were supreme, and with the slightest hit of luck they would have had more than the goal Davies scored in the second half. With that equaliser Bury put on hot pressure. Everton only came in spasms, and it was from one of these that they took the lead. A long ball by Watson saw McCowan falter his serious slip during the game, and Lawton bounced on the opportunity to score a grand goal, the ball travelling low and away from Bradshaw, the Bury goalkeeper. The fourth goal, scored near the end was a fluky sort of affair. A “head” flick by Stevenson appeared to be well covered by Bradshaw, who at one time was on Everton’s books, but the ball alighted on a lumpy piece of turf and “broke” to such extent that it flew over the goalkeeper’s shoulder and went into the net. In all the circumstances the football was quite entertaining but I think we can safely say that football in June will not be attempted again. The players did well under trying conditions, but when I say that there were only 3,522 people present it can be realised what people think of football in this month. Everton were unable to play Mercer, who has returned to the South and Lindley who took his place, will join the R.A.F today. Everton: - Sagar (captain), goals; Jackson and Greenhalgh, backs; Lindley, Jones (Tom), and Watson, half-backs; Sumner, Bentham, Lawton, Stevenson and Boyes, forwards. Bury: - Bradshaw, goal; Robinson and Gemmill, backs; Livingstone, McGowan, and Halton, half-backs; Jones, Davies, Burdett, Dougal and Carter, forwards. Referee; Mr. P. Snape (Swinton).
Everton Jun 3, Manchester U Jun 1
At Goodison Park. Everton were worthy winners of an interesting game, a feature of which was a brilliant hat-trick by Powell. Ireland, Hankin, Finnis, and Steele were other outstanding figures. Cope was a clever goalkeeper for the visitors, and Walton and Gillott also defended stubbornly. Morris (who scored their goal), Kenwright and Hall were best of an attack who were allowed little scope.

CUP TRIUMPH
June 10, 1940. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log.
Everton wound up the season on a triumphant note by winning the Lancashire Senior Cup –for the fifth time in history –at Gigg Lane on Saturday, when Bury, champions of the North West Region, fell 4-2. Everton won easing up in the end, but they had to weather a terrific Bury storm for about 25 minutes in the second half when the “Shakers” did, in truth, try to shake them up. Everton recovered their balance and a Watson true-to-an-inch passed, Lawton to burst between McGowan and Gemmill and crack home one of those mighty drives which have made Lawton the most feared centre-forward in football. It never left the ground for the 25 yards. Bury, collapsed like a house of cards, and Stevenson’s header made it safe. In the opening half Burdett had given Bury the lead, but Lawton’s penalty and Bentham’s brilliant header had placed the Blues in front. Stars in the game were Greenhalgh, Watson, Jones, Bentham and Stevenson for the Blues No, Bury player did better than Livingstone, the right-half whom the selectors persistency ignore despite strong recommendations from sound judges. Mr. Andrew Coffey, Everton’s chairman; Mr. Theo Kelly, secretary; Mr. Walter Cartwright, of Liverpool F.C; Mr. Ike Robinson, Liverpool County F.A. secretary, and Mr. T. Arthur Jones, hon secretary of the Bootle J.O.C League were among the Everton party, and at the game I had chats with good friends from both Manchester clubs, Burnley and Chesterfield. Mr. Coffey’s splendid resture in personally giving all those in the Everton party a high tea on the way home was deeply appreciated, and the Blues skipper, Ted Sagar, made a little speech of thanks. So football passes with one big hope –that we may resume in normal conditions in August.

EVERTON WIN LANCASHIRE CUP
June 10, 1940. The Liverpool Echo
By Stork.
Two cups now adorn the Everton sideboard, the Liverpool Senior Cup, and the Lancashire Senior Cup which they won by beating Bury at Gigg Lane on Saturday. It was not an easy victory for Bury gave promise of capturing this magnificent trophy, but they missed the vital factor in football –goals. They were a more spirited side, and Everton defence often had to battle desperately to prevent their goal being riddled. They had their chances and failed to accept them, so the spoils went to the more calm, methodical team. With fewer opportunities Everton snapped on four goals, the third of which completely knocked the suffering out of Bury. The size of the attendance -3,522 –told one plainly what they thought of football in June. I think June football can now be marked down as a thing of the past. Most of the clubs (many clubs were represented at the match) are in favour of carrying on next season if only to make sure that “youth takes its bow.” Mercer, is down in the South again, and Lindley, who took his place, joint the R.A.F tomorrow, while Boyes is due to have his medical board this week.

EVERTON CHAIRMAN
June 21, 1940. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log
Mr. Will Gibbins was last night elected chairman of Everton Football Club in succession to Mr. Andrew Coffey. This was done at a special directors’ meeting at which Mr. Coffey, owing to a reoccurrence of his recent illness, resigned the position. Mr. Coffey succeeded Mr. Ernest Green a month or so ago when Mr. Green and Mr. Gibbins were suspended by the Football Association in connection with the Joe Mercer case. Mr. Gibbons’ suspension ended on June 8. He joined the Everton board in 1920. Mr. Gibbins has always been an enthusiastic Everton worker. He will be occupying the chair for the first time.” The directors have decided to hold the annual meeting of the club on Thursday, July 11, when they ask the shareholders to support them in their desire to do away with competitive football for next season. Everton will give permission for the use of Goodison Park in connection with the scheme promoted by the Central Council for Recreative Physical Training through the Football Association.

EVERTON’S F.C.’S DECISION.
June 22, 1940. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log
The decision of the Everton F.C., directors to ask their shareholders to support their desire not to have competitive football next season has caused plenty of comment in the city. One appreciate that football at the moment, is in the melting pot, but I though Everton would have waited until after the Football league annual meeting –a meeting which will probably be held in two or three weeks time. The League plans to promote a Regional competition next season. If that or any other scheme is adopted Everton surely would wish to take part. As it read the resolution it may not mean that Everton would “put up the shutters.” If the shareholders did decide not to enter any competition next season, nothing could be done to after that ruling and the Blues, champions of the Football league would be left out in the cold. The governing authories are going ahead with preparations for next season, and Mr. Fred Hargreaves, secretary of the Lancashire F.A., states that entries for next season’s Lancashire Cup close on July 1 and Junior Cup and Junior Shield entries on August 1.

FOOTBALL NEXT SEASON.
July 29, 1940. The Evening Express.
Clubs Decide On Competitive Games.
The clubs of the Football League at their annual meeting in London today, decided to run competitive football next season in North and South regions. Matches will begin in the last week in August or first week in September, and will last till December 28. The clubs rejected a proposal that players should not be paid and agreed to a fee of 30s, a match and no bonus. The competition, in which at least 60 clubs are expected to take part, will be decided on goal average. The clubs decided to forgo trophies and medals. The competition will comprises twenty playing days, and the fixture list will be published as a whole in the near future. Mr. F. Howarth, the League Secretary gave an assurance that the Management Committee will see that every club has a requisite number of games. Clubs in defence areas will have to approach the Regional Commissioners. Clarifying the position of clubs in prohibited areas, Mr. Cuff stated that the League would not object to their playing their home and away games on grounds of other clubs. In referring to last season’s competition, Mr. W.C. Cuff, president of the League, said: “I am sure you will all agree that our clubs shared in the upkeep of the morale of the people.”

EVERTON F.C. MAY RESCIND DECISION.
June 30, 1940. The Evening Express.
Pilot’s Log
Everton Football Club will, in all probability, rescind their decision not to participate in competitive football next season. They are holding a special meeting of the directors tonight to consider the position arising out of football’s “Parliament” in London. The League decided that a two-regional league in North and South be run from August 31 to December 28 embracing 20 playing days. Everton were represented at the League annual meeting by Mr. W.C. Gibbins, their chairman, who announced that although Everton had decided not to participate in competitive football and that this decision had been confirmed by the shareholders, he thought the Board would decide to carry on, Mr. Theo Kelly, the secretary, immediately set to work to arrange tentative fixtures.

June 1940