Everton Independent Research Data

 

EVERTON TEAM FOR CHAIRTY MATCH
May 2, 1917 The Evening Express
By CRI
There should be some good football witnessed in the charity match between Everton and Leeds City at Goodison Park on Saturday. Leeds have displayed excellent form this season, and it will be interesting to see how they fare against a team of the calibre of Everton. The local eleven will be at full strength, having been chosen as follows;- Fern; Smith, and Thompson; Fleetwood, Wareing and Grenyer; Murray, Jefferis, Gault, Clennell, and Donnachie. It should be noted that the kick-off will be at three o’clock. As the proceeds are to be devoted to charity, Liverpool sportsmen who can spare the time will need no urging to attend. All must pay. Shareholders and season tickets holders will be admitted to their usual seats on presentation of their tickets and the payment is 1s. ATTENDANCE OF SEASON 280,000
May 3, 1917. The Liverpool Echo
Bee’s Notes
Chatting with Mr. W.C. Cuff, the Everton secretary I learnt that the season just ended had yielded an aggregate gate of no less than 280,000 spectators. Of a surety the city of Liverpool is fortunate, but fact remains that our clubs have kept abreast the times and the loyalty of the players has helped the clubs to make a success of the season. The number of soldiers passing through the turnstiles had totted up to 47,000 and that figure does not included the “stand” cases. The stand cases are really the sitting cases –soldiers who could not stand the period of an hour and a half. The number is 50,000 (including all matches) and the wounded in the stands numbered 24,000 all told. The club has subscribed £1,100 to the entertainment tax, and the 5 per cent tax for charity has yielded £750 and as half of the figure goes to local charities, and a sum from Saturday’s most interesting game will be added to it, the figure will be a splendid testimony to the forward position held by Everton.
Leeds v. Everton –or Charity
I call your attention to Saturday’s game for very special reasons. First in charity’s sweet name; second in the fact that Leeds have never before been seen here; third, because we shall see a blending of Newcastle, Villa, Sunderland, Grimsby, and Notts players. The team of which I shall say more tomorrow, is as follows; Hampton (Newcastle); Hindspeth (Newcastle)., Hampson (Newcastle); Hewison (Newcastle), Sherwin (Sunderland), Thorpe (Burnley); H and G. Stephenson (Villa), Peart (Notts Co), Moore (Sunderland), Mayson (Grimsby).

CHAIRTY MATCH AT GOODISON PARK
May 4, 1917, The Evening Express
By CRI
There will be several football “personalities” on view at Goodison Park, tomorrow when Everton will play Leeds City, the champions of the Midland League, in a match the whole of the proceeds of which are to go to charity. Although the visitors actually have been assisting Leeds City, it is one of the war’s general upsets that in normal times they all figure in other teams. For instance the whole of the rear division are Newcastle players, whilst a couple of well known Villa forwards are on the right wing. Given a continuance of the present brilliant weather there should be a hugh crowd present at the last match of the season, and there should be some pretty football, each eleven being anxious to shine. The teams will line up at three o’clock as follows;- Everton; Fern; Smith, Thompson; Fleetwood, Wareing, Grenyer; Murray, Jefferis, Gault, Clennell, Donnachie. Leeds City; Hampton (Newcastle); Hindspeth (Newcastle)., Hampson (Newcastle); Hewison (Newcastle), Sherwin (Sunderland), Thorpe (Burnley); H and G. Stephenson (Villa), Peart (Notts Co), Moore (Sunderland), Mayson (Grimsby).

SOCCER SOLDIERS HIT IN BATTLE
May 5, 1917. The Liverpool Football Echo
Bee’s Special
I have further news from the front which tells of footballers whose names are well known in the sports world, who have been hit. It was only during the week that I published news of Jack Sherdon, who has broken a leg while playing for his regimental side. Now the following names have to be asked to the fast growing list;- Nixon, Fulham’s goalkeeper, is missing, Mercer, Notts Forest, wounded in shoulder (Joe Mercer father). Pom Whitting, Chelsea and Brighton feared killed. Wragg –Leicester Fosse, wounded.

LEEDS FACE EVERTON
May 5, 1917. The Liverpool Football Echo
Everton today wound up the football innings with a very attractive fixture, Leeds City, winners of the Midland League. The day was very fine, and a fair amount should be divided between Liverpool and Leeds charities, as a consequence of the May fixture. Teams; Leeds City; Hampson, (Newcastle), goal; Hudspeth (Newcastle) and W. Hampson (Newcastle), backs; Price (Leeds), Thorpe (Burnley) and Hewison (Newcastle), half-backs; H and C Stepheson (Villa), Peart (Notts C), Moore (Sunderland), and Mayson (Grimsby), forwards. Everton; Fern, (captain) goal; Smith (West Brom) and Hinton (Crewe), backs; Fleetwood, Wareing and Grenyer, half-backs; Murray, Jefferis, Gault, Clennell, and Donnachie, forwards.
Jefferis Scored Early.
In the first minute Clen Stephenson should have scored quite easily, but mistimed the ball, his mistake. His mistake was very expensive as Donnachie presented Jefferis with a chance that he used with nice effect, thus in five minutes Everton were a goal up. Perhaps it was as well, for at any rate, the effect of the goal in the energies of both sides was patent. They gave up the indifferent stands of football, and the game improved as a consequence. There was a Newcastle thing about the Leeds forward work that pleased the spectators and the visitors were not afraid in shooting either. Price tested Fern, and Peart with a free kick made Fern save smartly. Leeds would not be denied, and the Everton goal had a miraculous escape. Smith standing on the goal line cleared when Fern was not near, and Fern later hit the ball up when a goal seemed surety. Donnachie and Gault dribbled delightfully, and the brothers Stephenson showed us Bache like movements, notably when Clem back heeled the ball, and, mark you, found his brother, but the Everton defence had anticipated the menaceurve. It was a hard task that was set young Hinton, the Crewe back, who was deputising for Thompson, and gradually he was worm down and at the twenty-first minute Referee Forshaw signalled an equalising goal. Moore was the scorer, and Mayson was the man who made the goal possible.
Scientific Play
Considering the gusty character of the wind, play had been capital. It was a matter of science today, and the crowd thoroughly relished the afternoon’s sport. The old Blackpool –Burnley player, Thorpe, was a prominent figure in attack and defence, and whereas Clennell once wasted a ball he now centred so well that any forward up would have scored with ease. No one took the gift, and Leeds got into their stride again and found the wind pretty helpful. The odd side game was tried with a great deal of success by both sides until the forwards though fit to have a care about their positions. Leeds would have scored comfortably when Mayson caught Smith napping but Peart stumbled just as he was about to take the ball in his stride. Before the danger had been cleared Fern was called upon to be daring, and swift. Everton netted the ball, only to find that Jefferis had charged the goalkeeper when that worthy had not possession of the ball.
Half-time; Everton 1, Leeds City 1

THE KING & QUEEN.
Liverpool Echo - Monday 07 May 1917
THEIR MAJESTIES AND WAR WORK. LIVERPOOL ViSST.
COMING TO MERSEYSIDE MAY 15.
MUNITION WORKS.
HONOUR FOR CITY AND MUNITIONEERS.
We are authorised to announce that their Majesties the King and Queen are honouring Liverpool with visit Tuesday, the 15th inst., for the purpose of inspecting munition works and other war activities. The necessary arrangements are under discussion with the Lord Mayor, the Dock Board, and other authorities.  It just year before the outbreak of Far that King and Queen paid their last State visit Liverpool. July 11th, 1913, was the date, and few people will have forgotten that glorious pageant. Liverpool was one of the last places to be visited in the of the Duchy, and the summer-like weather and the crowded streets combined to give right greeting to their Majesties, who had stayed overnight in Knowsley.  Within St. George's Hall addresses of welcome were presented by the Corporation, the University, and the Chamber of Commerce, and a knighthood was conferred on Mr. J. S- Harmood Banner, M.P., the then Lord Mayor.  Subsequently Royal party lunched at the Town Hall, and afterwards they drove to the Pierhead and embarked Galatea, the Dock Board tender, for a trip on the Mersey. The King and Queen boarded the Mauretania, which leviathan of the merchant fleet they inspected with interest, and then entered and formally declared open the new Gladstone Dock. Not the interesting feature of the eventful day was the visit to the Everton football ground, there were present no fewer than 15,000 school children dressed in red, white, and blue, who formed into massive Union Jack. Naturally, the coming visit will entirely shorn of the spectacular interest of its predecessor, for this occasion their Majesties' intention is to see at first hand the throbbing war activities of Liverpool.

EVERTON SURPRISED BY LEEDS CITY ELEVEN
May 7, 1917. The Liverpool Echo
Bee’s Notes
“It may be for years –it may be forever,” as the old song. When shall we see another football game from the seniors? It may be not for months, I am not a pessimist and I believe some sort of football in Lancashire is inevitable next September, but the fact remains that the position of affairs at the moment is not happy. Well, we’ll wait and –look for a bright resumption. It only remains now for a statement on the capital game given in the Leeds City debut at Everton. Charity gets the best part of £200 and would have gained much more if the weather had not been so hot during the week. As a matter of fact, Saturday’s turned out cold and quite suitable for football, and the players gave a very interesting exhibition. Leeds were top-dog and deservedly so, for they played with more understanding than Everton, whose balance was out of joint early on when Thompson could not appear and a player named Hinton (Crewe) deputising opened erratically. Hinton improved as time wore on, and with Smith playing top-hole football, and Fern clean saving many hot drives one could not complain of the defence. It is a long time since so reconvict an opposition was seen at Goodison Park. Why? Because Leeds kept the ball on the ground, did not elaborate their passes or dribble and shot often. The blending of Newcastle and Aston Villa personalities has had its effect on the sides, and draught like Newcastle tactics allied to Villa’s trickery and a touch of ginger makes, on the whole, a very delectable football dish.
Man Know They Partner.
The Everton half line did not have an easy task. The opposition wingmen could never guarantee what the forwards would do with the ball. How many forwards can you put in your mind’s eye such forwards announcing very plainly what their next move would be? You’ll want a ready reckoned to help you in name the big figure. Now, Leeds planned different moves by different tactics. They were not stereotyped and they got Everton guessing. One outstanding example was the back heeling of Clem Stephenson. He only used it once, but his partner was wide-a-wake to the possibility if not the probability and the effect was emphatically all favourable to the chance, of Leeds getting a goal. One could trace the offside game adopted by Hudspeth to the partnership of McCraken in the days when Newcastle were playing. On the vexed topic of offside I shall dwell at a later date. It is sufficient for the moment to say that Gault lay offside all too frequently and that Everton played the same trick with almost as much success as fell to the lot of Hudspeth. All the time Leeds played one could trace back their pedigree. Thorpe was just another sample. Burnley and Boyle were stamped all over his play. A clean-limbed fellow. Thorpe took the eye with his wise passes and his heading. Of what use is it to take the ball from a rival if your plant it badly and bring upon your own head another attack from the opposition? Thorpe made use of the ball. Peart possibly through the light ball, and in a large degree to Wareing’s careful watching, was not prominent, even though he goaled. He was slow, and his wings were too swift for him. C and J. Stephenson were clever and novel but Clem tended to spoil his game by lying offside. Mayson and Moore played really good football and the Sunderland man was especially good.
“Bite” in the Proceedings
The game started slowly and carelessly, but a goal to Jefferis from Donnachie infused the “bite” into the proceedings and near the end Jefferis and Thorpe got to loggerheads. It was a pity, for the game had been enjoyable and instructive up to that point. We don’t need instruction on temper-losing, having had quite a goodly education this season in the bad side of hot-tempered footballers.

EVERTON SURPRISED BY LEEDS ELEVEN
May 7, 1917, The Liverpool Echo
Bee's Notes
“It may be for years – it may be forever,” has the old song when shall we see another football game from the seniors? It may be not for months. I am not a pessimist and I believe some sort of football in Lancashire is inevitable next September, but the fact remains that the position of affairs at the moment is not happy. Well we'll wait and – look for a bright resumption. It only remains now for a statement on the capital game given in the Leeds City debut at Everton. Charity gets the best part of £200, and would have gained much more if the weather had not been so hot during the week. As a matter of fact, Saturday turned out cold and quite suitable for football, and the players gave a very interesting exhibition. Leeds were top-dog, and deservedly so, for they played with more understanding than Everton, whose balance was out of joint early on, when Thompson could not appear and a player named Hinton (Crewe) deputising opened erratically. Hinton improved as time wore on, and with Smith playing top-hole football, and Fern clean saving many hot drives, one could not complain of the defence. It is a long time since so scientific an opponent was seen at Goodison Park. Why? Because Leeds kept the ball on the ground, did not elaborate their passes or dribble and shot often. The blending of Newcastle and Aston Villa personalities had its effect on the side and draught like Newcastle tactics allied to Villa's trickily and a touch of ginger makes, on the whole a very delectable football club.

Man Know –They Partners
The Everton half backs did not have an easy task. The opposition wingmen could never guarantee what the forward would do with the ball. How many forwards can you put in their mind's eye, such forwards announcing very plucky, what their next move would be? You'll want a ready reckoned to help you to name the big figure. Now, Leeds planned different moves by different tactics. They were not stereotyped and they got Everton guessing. One outstanding example was the back heeling of Clem Stephenson. He only used it once, but his partner was wild awake to the possibility, I not the probability and the effect was emphatically all favourable to the chance, of Leeds getting a goal. One could trace the offside game adopted by Hudspeth to the partnership of McCracken in the day's when Newcastle were playing. On the vexed topic of offside I shall dwell at a later date. It is sufficient for the moment to say that Gault lay offside all too frequently; and that Everton played the same trick with almost as much success as fell to the lot of Hudspeth. All the time Leeds played one could trace back their pedigree. Thorpe was just another sample. Burnley and Boyle were stamped all over his play. A clean-limbed fellow Thorpe took the eye with his wise passes, and his heading. Of what use is it to take the ball from a rival if you plant it badly and bring upon your own head another attack from the opposition? Thorpe made use of the ball, Peart possibly through the “light,” ball, and in a large degree to Wareing's careful watching, was not prominent, even though he goaled. He was slow and his wings were too swift for him. C and J. Stepheson were clever and novel, but Clem tended to spoil his game by lying offside. Mavson and Moore played really good football, and the Sunderland man was especially good.

“Bite” in the Proceedings
The game started slowly and carelessly, but a goal to Jefferis from Donnachie infused the “bite” into the proceedings and near the end Jefferis and Thorpe got to loggerheads. It was a pity, for the game had been enjoyable, and instructive up to that point. We don't need instruction on temper-losing, having had quite a goodly education this season in the bad side of hot tempered footballers. Murray failed to respond to the work Jefferis get him to have, and only Donnachie lived up to his best form. Alan Grenyer was strong, Wareing stronger and Fleetwood a shade below par. Smith was excellent and Fern fielded some very awkward shots in confident manner. I would that all of you, readers had been present for I'm confident had you would have enjoyed the game.

EVERTON BEATEN BY LEEDS
May 7, 1917. The Evening Express
By CRI
The only senior game in the district on Saturday took place at Goodison Park, where Everton received a visit from Leeds City, champions of the Midland section, and were beaten 3-1. As the total proceeds were to be divided between the charities of Leeds and Liverpool, it was satisfactory to see a good crowd present. The spectators included a large number of wounded soldiers, who were accommodated on one of the stands. The taking realised about £200. Although there was nothing depending on the result, the players were whole-hearted in their efforts and the two goals scored in the first half were a fair reflex of the run of the game. Play had been in progress only a few minutes when Everton took the lead. After a tricky run down the wing Donnachie transfer to the centre and the ball went out to Jefferis, who netted from short range. The Everton goal had a marvellous escape after this from a corner kick, Fern's save being a masterpiece. However, Leeds eventually drew level, Moore netting from Mayson's centre. All through the match the referee's whistle was heard with great frequency for off-side, and this was particularly so in the second half, Hudspeth lying a long way forward, with the result that the Blues were often caught napping. Some clever moves were forthcoming from the brothers C and J. Stephenson, of Aston Villa, and Hinton (Crewe), who was at left back for Everton, had a stiff task in facing them. They kept Peart well supplied with short passes, and the cleverly scored, Moore putting through their third goal. Except for the frequency of the off-side infringements it was enjoyable game to watch. All the visiting forwards played well. Huthspth was a steady pivot, and Hampson was a clever custodian. This remark also supplies to Fern. Smith kicked a good length, the forwards of whom Donnachie and Jefferis showed up the best –not finishing as they might have done.

ANOTHER CHEERY EPISTLE FROM TIM COLEMAN
May 8, 1917. The Liverpool Echo
Bee's Notes
Ever a source of good fun. “Tim Coleman” so far as I am concerned, has been a fruitful source from the trenches. “P.C.” Tim sent me a letter-this week. It must interest you:-
Just a few lines while we have time for a breather, after having so many days. Am pleased to say that the weather has been champion latterly – not before time. Well, the lads have been “at it” again, and I am sorry to say caught it, Red-hot.” I am afraid the toll will be a heavy one. Dixon the Fulham goalkeeper, is missing; J. Mercer, Notts Forest has a blight one through his shoulder and Pom Whiting (Chelsea and Brighton), has I am afraid, “done west.” He went down for the stretcher-bearers and while leading them up a shell came over and dropped amongst them. Poor old Pom –he was one of the best. We were cracking a few jokes together two days previously. Wragg, who played with Leicester Fosse, has also been wounded. C.S.M. Gibson has rejoined us and he was with poor old Ripley, when he died. The old lads are gradually being thinned out. I have seen a number of prisoners, and they seen a smart set of fellows. I see T. Barber was playing for Brentford recently. He must have been a wonderful recovery. We look like having a very warm summer in more senses than one. Haven't seen Sandy Turnbull lately, and sincerely hope he got through the last push all right. If it rested with his shrapnel helmet he would come out with flying colours. One of our lads had a narrow escape. “A bullet went in the front of his helmet, and came out at the back! He was wearing a Balaclava at the time, and it also went through that. Talk about Bairnsfather's close shave. We have been making a big move forward lately and with this weather setting in, I think we shall see some big moves which will go a long way towards ending this terrible affair. I think we are winning easily now. Jimmy Sharp is just around here. I shall come across him soon, and put the hand of the law upon him!

EX-EVERTON CENTRE-FORWARD KILLED.
Liverpool Echo - Thursday 10 May 1917
Another friend of football memory has gone west.  Wilfred Toman, the Everton centre forward, who broke his leg in a game with Wolverhampton Wanderers has laid down his life for his country. He was with Everton in 1901-2, and the breakage referred to spoilt his career.  He never played again.  When he was on his game there was no prettier centre forward.- He was lightly built, but made up for this by his artistry.  He swerved in and out an opposition defence, and when he was in form Everton were very good to watch. Like his successor, Sandy Young, however, he had his off-days, and then the team seemed unable to go well. Toman had recently been engaged in shipping work, and i think he was on one our biggest ships, but, not at the time she was sunk.  A nice fellow was Wilfred, and all sportsfolk will join me in, sympathising with those he has left behind.  Wilfred, who was quickly promoted to lance-corporal, was hit during the enemy shelling of our trenches, and died shortly afterwards.  He put up a brave fight, says friend who saw him, but his injuries were too severe.

WILFRID TOMAN DEAD.
Daily Record - Thursday 10 May 1917
AN ABERDEEN LIGHT OF OTHER DAYS
Lance-Corpl, Wilfrid Toman, one of the finest players ever associated with the Aberdeen Football Club, has been killed at the front. He joined the Liverpool Regiment about six months ago, and went to the front three months later.  He was 41 years age, and a naive of Bishop Auckland, and came to Aberdeen twenty five years ago.  Wilfrid was a lad of fine physique, and, with a capital turn of speed and shooting ability, he proved great acquisition to local football- He first turned out for Aberdeen in their chanonry days, but subsequently went to Victoria United, and played one memorable cup tie for Orion, finishing up with broken arm. Then was secured by Burnley, after which Everton got him for what at the time regarded as a record transfer fee of £1OO. He sojourned in Southampton for while, then returned to Everton, and in their ranks made a great name for himself. He was capped for England inter- League match with Scotland. He had the misfortune to break his leg match against Wolverhampton, but continued to play until about ten years ago, his clubs, after he left Everton being Oldham and Stockport County. Entering the service the White Star Line, he was latterly engaged in the pursers’ department on their vessels running between Liverpool and Australia. 

NOTED FOOTBALLER KILLED
May 10, 1917 Aberdeen Journal
The Aberdeen football public and many other friends will hear with regret of the death at the front of Lance-Corporal Wilfred Toman, one of the finest players, and certainly one of the best centre-forwards who ever stripped for the Aberdeen club. He joined the Liverpool Scottish about six months ago, went to the front three months ago, and his brother, Mr. Joseph Toman, Westfield Cottage, 50 Whitehall Place, has received a letter from the chaplain announcing that he fell on Thursday last. He was 41 years of age. At native of Bishop Aucklamd, he came from Winchester College, where he was being educated, to Aberdeen nearly 25 years ago. A lad of fine physique, with a capital turn of speed and the ability to shoot from almost every position, he was a great acquisition to local football. He first turned out for Aberdeen F.C., then at Chanonry, but subsequently went to Victoria United, and played one memorable cup-tie for Orion, finishing with a broken arm. Football was booming across the Border, and he secured by Burnley. Everton got him for what was at the time regarded as a record transfer fee of £100, and after a sojourn with Southampton, he returned to Everton in whose famous eleven he made a great name for himself in English football. One of the honours which fell to him was an Inter-League cap for England v. Scotland. He had the misfortune to break his leg in a match against Wolverhampton Wanderers, but continued to play until about 10 years ago. His clubs after he left Everton being Oldham and Stockport County. Entering the service of the White Star Line, he was latterly engaged in the pursers' department on their vessels running between Liverpool and Australia.

ARCHIE GOODALL SUMMONED BY HIS WIFE.
Derby Daily Telegraph - Monday 14 May 1917
FAMOUS FOOTBALLER '
At Highgate Police Court, on Saturday, Archibald Lee Goodall, of Muswell Hill, formerly a professional footballer for Derby County, and who now conducts a gymnastic company on the music hall's was summoned by his wife, and applied for a separation order. The solicitor for the wife said the parties were married in 1893, and there were two grown-up children. For the past four years she had been treated very badly by her husband. During this time a woman who performed in his company had lived in the house. During the last twelve months the defendant had relegated his wife to the kitchen while he occupied the dinning-room where he had his meals with the other woman, who did the catering and cooking and, in fact, took over the whole duties usually fulfilled by the wife. The wife said her husband and the woman would go out to walks together. They refused her permission to enter the dining room while they were there. Asked if she made any allegation as to improper conduct between her husband and the women, the wife said she could make no definite allegation. The magistrate suggested a settlement without going further into the case, and the hearing was adjourned.

PARKER, EVERTON CENTRE WOUNDED
May 17, 1917. The Liverpool Echo
Bee's Notes
Everton, Leeds, Glasgow, aye, all football clubs and their followers will regret to learn that Bobbie Parker has been wounded in Egypt. News from a Celtic friend, who has advised me this morning of the occurrence, tells that Parker is progressing favourably. He lost a brother in the war, you may remember. The ex-Everton centre had joined the Royal Scottish Fusiliers.
Fern, the Everton goalkeeper, and Nuttall Stockport and ex-Everton are due “up” this week.
Galt in France
Here I give a photograph of “Jimmie” otherwise Lieutenant, Galt. The Everton captain, who was “locked” in friendship with Bobbie Parker, is now in France. His last game in Liverpool was in the Military International at Goodison Park –a game that should have been an annual event, but for some unaccountable reason was not proceeded with this season. I am indebted to the Scottish “Weekly Record” for the picture of friend Galt.

“BOBBY” PARKER WOUNDED.
Daily Record - Friday 18 May 1917
We regret to announce that Robert Parker, the Everton centre-forward, has been wounded in action in “Bobby," as was familiarly called, was brought out by the Ashfield, with which club he received all the junior honours. After the great Ashfield-Kilwinning Rangers Scottish Junior Cup final at Firhill in 1910, he and another “Bobby " —R. Brown, of the Kilwinning club, now assisting Third Lanark —were fixed up the Rangers. Parker was unfortunate enough to be contemporary with Willie Reid at Ibrox, consequently his appearance in the “ Light Blues" League eleven were few and far between. Ultimately he was transferred to Everton, in whose ranks he was prolific scorer. During the major portion of the season just closed, “ Bobby" assisted Greenock Morton. A few months ago Private Parker, who resides at Possilpark, Glasgow, had a brother killed in action. The deceased. David, also played in the junior Ashfield attack.

NOTES AND NOTIONS
May 19, 1917. The Liverpool Football Echo
By “Vin”
Though the three retiring directors of the Everton Football Club are offering themselves for re-election, it is quite on the cards that one of them who has had an exceptionally long “innings” may not cling to office much longer. A waggish reader playfully suggests – playfully, mark you – that the election of one Mr. Charles Dickinson as an E.F.C officer beater –is much overdue. Archie Goodall's name has been in the public glare this week. In the days of his youth he played football hereabouts for Stanley and later put in a course with Everton, their at Anfield. He is not likely to forget one incident there. In those days through lack off accommodation at Anfield; the players had to dress at the Sandon Hotel, some distance away. The consequence was that at times the players were unceremoniously jostled and nastily accosted and on one occasion on returning to the hotel dressing room, after playing in a “robust” game, he was rather badly “buffeted” by a section o the crowd. A. Goodall afterwards returned to Stanley and subsequently played for several clubs in England and Ireland but made his international name with Derby County, and Glossop. He represented Ireland on ten occasions, while his more famous brother John, Preston and Derby was England's centre in fourteen national games. Archie has for sometime been “turning” lucratisley on the “halls.” Sandy Young's processor in Everton's team, Wilfred Toman, whose death at the front in reported appeared in the Football League team v. The Scottish League in 1899. He was a “Blue” at the time.

STUD MARKS
May 19, 1917. The Liverpool Football Echo
By Louis T Kelly
Our City's seasoned sport lovers learned with unfeigned regret of Wilford Toman's second and greatest fall on the field of battle. Wilfred was a leader much above the average standard in general tactics and when Everton in the late nineties were seeking hard to build up a second league championship winning team they cast envious eyes. Burnley was where Toman was making a name for himself and his club. Everton made some rare forward captures about that period. Thus the brothers Jack and Bert Sharp were secured from Aston Villa. Equally notable was the advent thereabouts of James Settle –an inside right in chief when with Bury. The champion goalkeeper of the second division –Walter Abbott –was also attracted Mersey wards, and –there you are!

Yes, Everton's practice match prospects appeared to please on the dawn of the 1899-1900 season, which they maugurated with a home match against Sheffield United with a team of the following calibre; - Muir; W. Balmer, and Molyneux; Wolstenholmes, Boyle, and Taylor; J. Sharp, Settle, Toman, Abbott, and Gee. But somehow the combination failed to fit, and the opening three matches were all lost. Hence a change of personally became necessary for match N0 4, which was none other than Liverpool at Anfield. Of course Everton won and handed over the wooden spoon to the Reds. The Everton team's team that September v. Liverpool; Taylor was taken from left half and placed at outside right, Sharp going inside whilst Abbott and Gee as a left wing were dropped. Settle coming in at inside left, where he was destined to achieve his greatest successes. The local coal merchant, Scholfield –then merely a “black diamond” in the rough – was installed at outside left. With regard to Everton's opening forward line that season, it is interesting to note that four of the five developed physiques of the round order. Gee was already an “alderman.” He afterwards went to Notts, where his speed surprised the natives. Abbott, as most people will recall, put on weight heavily in his later Everton days, and, along with Settle, created not a few ripples when on view at Goodison in a charity match some time ago; whilst Sharp has ever been of comely proportions. Of the Everton side enumerated at the outset. Muir kept his place well that winter, Kitchen (now at the Crystal Palace) only deputising twice. Likewise W. Balmer, although that other local back W. Molyneux was passed over in favour of George Eccles (now Bolton Wanderers trainer). Eccles was a right back, and when Molyneux went Balmer was “left.” Sam Wolstenholmes and Dicky Boyle as half-backs were useful and steady; the former building up a reputation which times the gentlemanly Boyle was approaching the veteran stage, and showed the coming decline that season by giving more free kicks than during the whole of his previous very considerable services in an Everton jersey. As for John Taylor, this 1899-1900 season showed him in his most versatile form, for he began at left half, next went to outside right, then became inside left, next inside right, back again to inside left, next left half, then outside right, then again to inside right for a goodly spell, back once more to outside left, and finally wound up a remarkable individual season with four consecutive appearances at outside left, with another Scotsman, McDonald, as partner. A feature of Taylor's work that year was his pronounced fondness for opening Everton's scoring – a fondness” he retained to the end of his very active service career. As for Abbott, his experience were of the abnormal order, for upon being dropped after Everton's third match he was experimented with as a reserve teams half-back. Meanwhile a Refus-headed youth named Blythe of Jarrow had been performing usefully at left half in the League team, but with Abbot's speedy development in the second team came the public clamour for a senior team “recall.” And never did man justify himself better than did the man from the Midlands. From October 14 to December 2 Everton hadn't won a match. They occupied thirteen place in the table when Abbott was tried in their thirteenth fixture –and the luck turned. For Everton that day beat Derby County (including Fryer, Bloomer and Archie Goodall) in hamesome fashion by 3 clear goals. Abbott bottled up Wombwell and the mighty Bloomer to completely that 15,000 people were sent home delighted “indeed.” As for Walter he became a fixture at left half for nigh two season. Poor Toman –the played a useful part that winter, first at centre forward and in the closing months as Sharp's partner, for he gave way at centre to Jack Proudfoot (from Blackburn Rovers). Proudfoot's trouble, by the way, like that of Abbott and Gee was prolific flesh. Proudfoot and Gee in fact, savoured of the pantomime policeman in the matter of girth. In 1900-1901 Toman did not once figure in Everton's League team, Proudfoot holding away throughout, save when occasionally replaced by a Notts Forester, one Beveridge who, sad to say, encouraged an early death. Both But England's recent fallen one returned to League service full of hopefulness, on September 2, 1901 when he led the way to a 3-1 win over Manchester City at Goodison. Alas, for human promise and fragilities. A few days later Wolverhampton Wanderers came here. Everton's middle line has meanwhile been strengthened by the advent of Tom Bootle, the famous Rovers. And what a business like attack was theirs! It read from right to left; Sharp, Taylor, Toman, Settle, and Bell. Play had not been very long in progress when Jones the Burly Wolstenholmes right back, advanced to check the oncoming Toman. There was a collision a crack and a fall. Toman was taken away per ambulance and examination showed that he had sustained a compound fracture of the leg. That sealed his playing days and now we know that he has fallen in the sterner playing fields abroad. There was one –esy, two –others striking features about that match with the Wolves. First, Everton played better with ten men than with eleven. They won handsomely 6-1 and most notably of all, whilst Settle performed the hat-trick in the first half Taylor went and did “likewise” in the second stage! The writer cannot recall a finer display of individual and deadly forward-ness than that which Settle served up that afternoon. Minus his centre forward Settle found himself with more room and moving space than usual, and he simply can tricked, and worried those luckless Wolves (Phesent and Co) off their feet. Baddley of all men will never forget his experience at Goodison that afternoon. Hardon this reminiscent strain dear reader, but Toman's sad “double” yes glorious “finale” complete it. Wilfred was endowed with considerably above the average “footer” education, and wrote a beautiful hand.

News has been received in this country that popular Lance-Corporal Bobby Parker, who has been serving at a base in Egypt and then followed into the firing line has been wounded. He is in hospital but is going on favourably Good. Parker's admirers can quite understand how that the popular erstwhile Everton leader would make a during raider –indeed his keenness's at Goodison was more than once miss constructed by the man with the whistle. Parker by the way, is attached top the Royal Scottish Fusiliers. He has seen a lot of service (football) since going abroad, and says that his comrades are simply made on the game out there. Parker may not be a prophet in the strict sense of the term. But he predicts a skill greater future for the game when peace which he speedily anticipates is proclaimed.

HARRY GRUNDY
Cheshire Chronicle-Saturday 19 May 1917
Roll of Honour
News came through to the father of Private Harry Grundy on Sunday that his son had been wounded in France. At the time of writing it is stated the wounds are in the mouth, nose and eye, and that he has arrived in England and is being treated at a hospital at Colchester. Pte Grundy is the son of the licensee of the “Greenland Fisheries.” He is a well known sportsman, and once played for the Everton Football team with conspicuous ability. He joined up with the Cheshires and has been in France for some time.

ROLL OF HONOUR
May 19, 1917. Chester Chronicles
News came through to the father of Private Harry Grundy on Sunday that his son had been wounded in France. At the time of writing, it is stated the wounds are in the mouth, nose and eye, and that he has arrived in England and is being treated at a hospital at Colchester. Pte Grundy is the son of the licensee of the “Greenland Fisheries.” He is a well known sportsman, and once played for the Everton Football team with conspicuous ability. He joined up with the Cheshire's and has been in France for some time. It is also rumored in regard to Private Reuben Williams, who was wounded twice in Gallipoli and France, and was on his way to the front again, that his boat has been torpedoed but he is safe, only receiving slight injuries.

WOLSTENHOLMES COACH WORK AT RHULEBEN
May 23, 1917. The Liverpool Echo
Bee's Notes
George Rogans, the former Garston footballer, who has for three years been interned at Rhuleben has sent to his home at Seaforth, a letter saying that he is in good health. He says:-
“Football started again last week (the date of the letter is March 31) and we played our replayed cup-tie with Barrache 7-Percy Hartley's team. It was a very hard struggle and rough at times, and we had to coach defeat for the first time this season, and for the second time in two years. We finished a goalless draw, but played extra time, and we were knocked out of the cup. Thus we have lost one of the honours we –gained last season; but we have still a five-point lead at the top of the league and we hope to win the championship again. We have had a long run of successes, and Sam Wolstenholmes is the key to the whole machine. His coaching and advice to all of us has proved of great value. We are a very fond of the old Evertonian, both on and off the field. For the first half of the season I am leading goal scorer for the first division (14 goals) and Clem Burnhill, our inside right is second with 10 goals. His brother, W.J. Rogans has safely marched up in the promotion stakes and is now a sergeant.

NOTES AND NOTIONS
May 26, 1917. The Liverpool Echo
By Vim
It seems to have escaped Press notice that W. Toman's service with Everton was not continuous. He was down South to Southampton, I think for a season, and, if I remember aright Dr. Baxter required his return to Everton. Subsequent to his injury he acted for a time as auxiliary trainer – the official trainer being under suspension at the time.

SANDY YOUNG
May 28, 1917. Liverpool Echo
Now In Penitentiary and Well
The “Echo” today received the following cablegram from Melbourne;-
Young, who was sentenced to three years in Bendigo Goal and was transferred to Ararat Lunatic Asylum, is now in Pentridge Penitentiary, well. The well-known Everton footballer was sentenced for the manslaughter of his brother.

FERN
May 30, 1917 Nottingham Evening Post
Fern, the Everton and Lincoln City goalkeeper reported yesterday at Liverpool for army service, and has been placed in the R.F.A.

MR. SUNLIGHT
June 9, 1917 Chester Chronicles
The conferment of a barony upon sir W.H. Lever and the interest evinced in the title the new peer would adopt recalls a good story. Some years ago an Everton football team went to Port Sunlight to play a match and inaugurate the new football ground. Mr. lever, as he was then had consented to kick off. Everton had lost the toss, and Mr. lever was just about to send the ball on its journey with a big kick when Paddy Sheridan, one of the Everton players, probably fearing that the gentleman might land the ball somewhere in the vicinity of the home goalkeeper, cried out, to the amusement of Mr. Lever and players and spectators alike, “Don't kick it down there; put it over here, Mr. Sunlight!”

THE NEW ARRANGEMENTS
June 16, 1917. The Liverpool Echo
The annual meeting of the Everton Football Club was held last evening at the Common Hall. Hackins nay, Mr. W.R. Clayton presiding over a small attendances. The Chairman said that they had now played football for three seasons under war conditions and it had been proved that the spell-ports were wrong and that football and other reasonable recreations were a great national asset in these strenuous times. During the three seasons they in common with other clubs, had experienced grave difficulties. A great number of players were fighting for their country, but they had received assistance from men who were experts in munitions making and in other essential trades, who had helped them to keep the game going. Not only had the clubs in continuing their operations given recreation to the war workers, but also to soldiers in training and those who had been wounded. The records showed that they had admitted free to the ground during last season 51,040 soldiers. The players had cheerfully and ungrudgingly given them assistance without remuneration. Alluding to the conditions under which the game had been played during the past season the Chairman said that all the leading League clubs has stood out against the proposed pooling o gates and had assisted upon the old plan of the home club taking its own gate thus enabling the progressive clubs to reap the advantage of their own enterprise and expenditure. The decision was arrived at a League meeting held at the commencement of the season, and he proposed the adaption of the policy on behalf of all the leading clubs and at the request of the president of the League, quite recently the club, and himself had been critised in the Press for the action taken on the occasion, the whole blame being thrown on the Everton Club, whereas he had merely voiced the opinion of the whole of the clubs in the First Division. He thought members of the Press might be fair and try to ascertain facts before going out of their way to make statements which were absolutely untrue.

Next season, the difficulties they would have to face would probably be greater than in the season just closed, as their players quite properly, would have to work full time and could not undertake long journeys. Consequently they would have to play in a restricted area and having examined the receipts of the clubs in that area, Mr. McKenna and himself had come to the conclusion that it would be impossible for some of the clubs to continue to play from a financial point of view. As a result, believing that from a national standpoint the game benefited hard workers, they felt they ought to agree to some scheme to help the less fortunate club's financially. The proposal was the next year 20 per cent of the home gate should be handed over to the visitors and on the figure it was believed that such action would enable every club in the combination to go through the season financially sound. The clubs who were likely to continue a large sum of money agreed to the proposal, which the Management Committee of the League would submit to the annual meeting next month, so he hoped next year they would play football as last season and against practically the same clubs. The football shown then was excellent, and in many games reached the highest standard ever reached in their career. Financially, the Everton Club was in a very healthy condition, in fact, from that point of view they were the strongest club in the kingdom, which was largely due to those who had managed the club from time to time, and who had worked on sound progressive lines. The report and balance-sheet, which have already been published, were adopted unammously. The proposed divided of 5 per cent per annum, free of income tax, on called-up capital was also agreed to. The retiring directors –Messrs H. Banks, J. Davies, and H. Halsall –were the only candidates and were declared elected for the ensuing three years. A note of thanks was accorded the chairman and directors, and it was decided to send a letter expressing good wishes to all the players on active service.

EVERTON F.C.'S ANNUAL MEETING.
Liverpool Echo - Saturday 16 June 1917
The annual meeting of the Everton Football dub wa« held evening, at the Common Hall, Hackine-hey, Mr. W. R. Clayton presiding over a small attendance. The Chairman said that they had now played footba.l for three seasons under war conditions, and it had been proved that the epon-eporte were wrong, and that footbaiJ and other reasonable recreations were great national asset in these strenuous times. ing the three seasons they, in common with other clubs, had experienced grave difficulties. A great number of players were fighting tor their country, but they had received assistance from men who were experts in munition making and in other essential trades, who had helped them to keep the game going. Not only had the clubs in continuing their operations given recreation to the war worker, but also to soldiers in training and those who Bad been wounded. The records showed that they had admitted free to the ground during last season. The players had cheer fully and ungrudgingly given them assistance without remuneration. Alluding to the conditions under which the game had been played during the past season, I the Chairman said that all the leading League clubs had stood out against the proposed of gates, and had insisted upon the old plan the home club taking its own gate, thus enabling the progressive clubs to reap the advantages of their own enterprise ana expenditure. This decision wa« arrived a League meeting held at the commencement of the season, and proposed the adoption of this policy behalf all the leading clubs and at the request of the president the League. Quite recently the club and himself had been criticised the Press for the action taken that occasion, the whole blame being thrown on the Everton Club, whereas he had merely voioed the opinion of the whole of the clubs in the First Division. He thought members of the Press might be fair and try to ascertain facts before going out their way to make statements which were absolutely untrue. Re next season, the difficulties they would have to face would probably greater than in the season just closed, as their players, quite properly, would have to work full time and could not undertake long' journeys. Consequently they would have to play in a restricted area, and, having examined the recipts of the clubs in that area, Mr. M'Kenna and himself had come to the conclusion that would impossible for some of the clubs continue to play from financial point of view. As result, believing that from national standpoint the game benefited tired workers, they felt they ought to agree to some scheme to help the less fortunate clubs financially. The proposal was that next year per cent, of the home gates should handed over to the visitors, and on the figures it was believed that such action would enable every club in the combination to go through the season financially sound. The olubs who were likely to contribute a large sum of money agreed to the proposal, which" the Management Committee of the League would submit the annual meeting next month, he hoped next year they would play football as last season and against practically the same olubs. The football shown then was excellent, and in many games reached the highest standard ever reached in their oareer. Financially, the Club was a very healthy condition. Io fact, from that point of view they were the strongest olub in the kingdom, which was largely due those who had managed the club irom time totime. and who had worked on sound progressive lines. The report and balance-sheet, which have already been published, were adopted unanimously. The proposed dividend of 5 per cent, per annum, free of income tax, on oalled-up capital was also agreed to. The retiring directors—Messrs. H. Banks, J. Davies, and H. Halaall—were the only can didates. and were declared elected for the ensuing three years. A vote of thanks was accorded the chairman and directors, and it was decided to send letter expressing good wishes to all the players on active service. '

NOTES AND NOTIONS
June 16, 1917. The Liverpool Football Club
By Vin
Mr. Harry Banks, Everton's newest director, is most attentive and painstaking, the only one with full marks last season for the team's away matches and the board's meetings. Mr. Banks enjoys the unique distinction from a syndicate point of view, of having become an Everton board member without the “inconvenience “ –to give the proxy-nuisance the mildest of terms – of a contest, and in being re-elected as he was last night, without opposition. Reference was made here recently to the fact that Jack Sharp's civil “leave” might terminate at the end of the month like that of Charlie Thomson of Sunderland. Bert Sharp, who is nearing the legal “non-combatant” age, has been on munitions at Aintree for some time.

PALLETT DEAD & PARKER IN BAD WAY
June 19, 1917. The Liverpool Echo
Bee's Notes
News in hand this morning is not nice “Bobbie” Parker, the Everton centre-forward was wounded eight times, and he fears he will not play football again. We are all hopeful that, as in the case of Tom Barber the popular player will recover and find his worst fears confounded. If any reader has Parker's address, I shall be pleased to learn it. The next item is the death of the one-time crack, slow-bowler of country crocket Harry Pallett, of Warwickshire.

BETTER NEWS OF EVERTON CENTRE
June 22, 1917. The Liverpool Echo
Bee's Notes
It is good to hear that the statement circulated that it was unlikely that Robbie Parker, Everton's centre forward, would play football again, owing to the injuries he had received at the front are exaggerated. Mr. W.C. Cuff received a letter from Parker a few days ago, in which the young Scot stated that he was in hospital in Cairo suffering from shrapnel wounds in his side. He had been under an operation, which had proved entirely successful in eliminating the shell fragments, and his wounds were healing splendidly. The doctor had assured him that he would soon be quite well again, and that there was no doubt about his being able to play football again as far as his present condition was concerned. The Everton Club sent a football to Parker last April, and, in reply, the latter said that he and others had been having a game on the desert. It was played under almost tropical conditions, whilst the players were their ordinary boots, and as little else as possible. Parker had not then been in the firing lines, but he must have made acquaintance with it soon afterwards.
• After an existence of 21 years it has been decided to wind up the Accrington Stanley Football Club.

FOOTBALLER FOR ARMY.
Daily Record - Tuesday 26 June 1917
GEORGE WILSON'S APPEAL DISMISSED.
At the Appeal Tribunal for Fife and Kinross, held at Kirkcaldy yesterday— Sheriff Fleming. K.C., presiding—George Wilson (33), married, coal miner, Kirkcaldy, appealed for exemption. It is stated that was experienced miner, having worked in the pit from the time he left school until 1904. He returned to the pit in January. 1916. He was medically examined at the pithead end passed for general service, and the Coal Mines Tribunal had refused him as was not employed in the pit m August, 1915. In addition to working as a miner, he had one of the largest tobacconist and hairdresser businesses in Kirkcaldy. Captain Maxwell, the military representative, said that Mr. Wilson was rather celebrity. He was a famous football player, in fact, an Internationalist, and being a thorough athlete, was just the man for the army.

SANDY YOUNG NOW IN PENITENTIARY, .AND WELL.
Liverpool Echo - Monday 28 May 1917
The "Echo" to-day received the following cablegram from Melbourne Young, who was sentenced to three years in Bendigo Gaol and was transferred to Ararat Lunatic Asylum, is now in Pentridge Penitentiary, well. The well-known Everton footballer was sentenced for the manslaughter of his brother.

J.H.GALT
Daily Record - Friday 29 June 1917
Lieutentant J.H. Galt, was wounded recently.  The many friends of the Rangers and Everton half-back will be gald to learn that he is himself again. 

"SMILER" WANTED IN ARMY.
Liverpool Echo - Friday 29 June 1917
George Wilson, the old Everton, Newcastle United, and Scottish forward, has been refused exemption by the Fife Appeal Tribunal. The ground of the appeal by Wilson, who carries on tobacconist's and hairdresser's business in Kirkcaldy, was that he was coal miner, and it was admitted that he was experienced miner. He bad, however, been refused exemption the Coal Mines Tribunal, as he was not in the pit in August, 1915. The military representative said that Wilson was thorough athlete, and just the sort of man they wanted for the Army.

NOTES AND NOTIONS
June 30, 1917. The Liverpool Football Echo
By Vin
A Wellington Barrack (London) friend tells me that the Everton players in Khaki – in compliance with the request of the shareholders at the annual meeting –have received a short and sweet note from the club thanking them for their services and wishing them a safe and speedy return. Sam Chedgzoy had quite recovered, and along with his colleagues Guardsman Kirsopp and Harrison, expects to have a “cross” shortly – a cross to France! Harrison (as on the field) has turned out a first class shot and an expert bomber. More trouble for the entrenched Hun “goalkeepers” when George heads up at the front!

 

 

May 1917