Everton Independent Research Data

 


J.H CALDWELL
Dundee Evening Telegraph - Wednesday 10 July 1912
The officials of Everton F.C. have done a good stroke of business in signing J. H. Caldwell, who last season guarded the sticks for Reading. Caldwell's first senior club was East Stirlingshire, but he came into prominence with the Biscuitmakers, for which club he played some marvellous games in the English Cup ties. He is considered be one of the smartest goalkeepers in the country.

F. GRAYER
Portsmouth Evening News - Saturday 13 July 1912
The Southampton Club have transferred F. Grayer to Everton and have signed E.E. Dalway as a professional.

A GOOD CAPTURE FO CHESTERFIELD
Sheffield Evening Telegraph - Monday 22 July 1912
Chesterfield Town have signed on L.C. Weller, a half-back, who has been receiving the maximum wage at Everton for three years. He went to Everton from a Stoke club. He is now 22 years of age; five foot ten inches; and weighs twelve stones; He was on Everton's list at $250 but got it reduced to $100

A DERBY COLLISION.
Nottingham Evening Post - Wednesday 24 July 1912
EX-FOOTBALLER TO PAY DAMAGES.
Archie Goodall, the well-known ex-footballer, and now performing in music-halls in a walking the-loop” turn, was at Derby County Court today ordered to pay £5O in damages in connection with a collision in which he was concerned as a driver of a motor-car. On August 6th last, about 8.30 p.m., Nellie Grace Tilbum, a young woman living at 121, Normanton road was cycling down a hill at Allestree and while passing a brake going in the same direction she was overtaken Goodall’s car. She was knocked off her machine, and the front wheel of the car went over both her thighs, fracturing one of them. The injury necssitated her detention at the Royal Infirmary for 36 weeks, and she underwent five operations, while a sixth was stated to pending. The evidence showed that defendant failed to sound his horn, and that after collision admitted to constable that he alone was to blame. Defendant asserted that the accident would not have occurred had the plaintiff not suddenly swerved.



TWO EVERTONIANS TRANSFERRED.
July 29 1912. The Liverpool Echo.
WILLIAM SCOTT TO LEEDS.
We are informed this morning that William Scott, the Everton goalkeeper, has signed on for Leeds United. William Scott was born at Belfast, and first made his name with local organisations. Linfield spotted him, and with that well-known Irish club he proved himself a first rate custodian. Everton were in search of a first class goalkeeper in 1904, and Scott was signed and played regularly until the close of last season, and with the Goodison Park crowd, he was very popular. However, towards the close of last season, differences rose between the player and the club, and Scott was placed on the transfer list. Rumours had it that he was going to a first Division club, but the “Echo” intimated time ago where he was likely to go; in fact it emphatically stated the club –Leeds City. The Yorkshire club have made satisfactory arrangements with the player, who will travel to and from Liverpool. Scott agained his first international cap for Ireland, representative games, and on several occasions he captained his side. He is 5ft 10 and half ins, in high and weights the scale of 11 st 12lbs.

Everton record. 1904-05; 16 League apps,
• 35 League apps ; 6 Fa Cup apps.
• ; 35 League apps, 8 Fa Cup apps
1907-08; 34 League apps 7 Fa Cup apps
1908-09; 36 League apps 2 Fa Cup apps
1909-10; 27 League apps 7 Fa Cup apps
1910-11; 31 League apps 3 Fa Cup apps
1911-12; 37 League apps 5 Fa Cup apps
Total League 251 apps, Fa Cup apps 38.
League Clean sheets 75, Fa Cup clean sheets 18

L.C. WELLER
Weller, is a good half-back, who has played with Everton first team on several occasions has been transferred to Chesterfield. He has been at Everton three years, and originally played for a south club. He was priced at £250 but eventually the sum was reduced to £100. Weller stands 5ft 11ins, and weights 12 stone.

Everton records: - 1909-10; 1 League apps, 1 goal.
1910-11; 5 League apps.
1911-12; 1 League app Total 7 League apps, 1 goal.

WHY DID SCOTT LEAVE.
July 30, 1912. The Liverpool Echo
The news published yesterday regarding William Scott's new club, Leeds United did not create great surprise, because we had told of the probability of his going to Leeds United. There is any amount of good goalkeeping in Scott, and the real interest in him so far as Liverpool is concerned is around the reason of his going from Everton. There is no doubt that in the latter stages of last season. Scott was credited with letting shots pass him that it was though he should have saved, and at the time I gave it as my opinion that in the majority of these cases, Scott was not to blame, he would have seemed to have been winged as an angel had he saved these unsaveable shots. The importance of the Blackburn Rover visit to Goodison Park and to result in a defeat to Everton may have caused Scott, to be discredited unfairly. I think that must have been the match, which settled the Everton directors upon a decision not to sign Scott. Why did Scott leave Everton? He himself asks me to say that he had no differences with the Everton directors. “Never a word with them” and his dismissal came as he says, “ I cannot get satisfaction as to why they did not re-engage me.” He is anxious that his friends should not be mislead as to the reason of his leaving Everton and challenges. The Everton directors to let the public know why they dismissed him. However, Scott is fixed up a fresh, and I think that the matter would be better let to “lie on the table.” We all wish the clever Irishman every success.

NOTABLE FOOTBALL TRANSFER.
Dundee Courier - Tuesday 30 July 1912
SCOTT, OF EVERTON, FOR LEEDS CITY.
Wm. Scott, the well-known Irish internationalist, who served Everton for seven years, has been transferred to Leeds City, He kept goal for Everton when they won the Cup, and was recognised as one of the greatest custodians in the country. He was chosen for Ireland during the last nine years, and had captained the side.

LEEDS CITY TO HAVE STRONG DEFENCE
Dundee Evening Telegraph - Wednesday 31 July 1912
In Next Season's Team.
When Everton declined to re-engage their goalkeeper, William Scott, everyone was surprised, and realised that something very unusual must have happened to break the! relationship between the club and the player. For although Scott has been Goodison Park for seven years, and that a long time in the life of a footballer, he was so good last season to be still one of the' leading goalkeepers. He was certainly first, choice for Ireland's national team, as has been for several years past, and in willingly losing his service! Everton have clearly made a sacrifice. Scott has been on the "open transfer" list since the end of last season, and though other first class, players have experienced the same difficulty; in finding fresh homes, the fact that he has not been transfered sooner is probably due to the fact that clubs, anxious to secure his services, have been unable to find the money to pay his fee. Chapman, the new Leeds City manager, has, however, evidently convinced the club directors of the folly of the cheap they have practised. Leeds' City have had lot of Irish players in the, past, but none who have possessed the footballing ability of Scott, and in scuring his' transfer the club have given first indication of getting together a really good side. With a defence of Scott, Ferguson (Dundee), and Law (Arbroath and Rangers), the City should do particularly strong.

AUGUST 1912

DOANLD SLOAN
Dundee Evening Telegraph - Wednesday 07 August 1912
East Stirlingshire have signed a successor to Bernard, last year's clever goalkeeper, who has gone top Reading. The new custodian is Donald Sloan, who was two seasons with Everton and one with Liverpool. His last club was Bathgate.

HOUSTON
Nottingham Evening Post - Saturday 10 August 1912
Houston, of Linfield, Belfast, who signed a League form for Everton, asked for it to be cancelled, but the reasons advanced were not considered adequate and no action was taken.

ALEX YOUNG TO SOUTH LIVERPOOL
August 12, 1912 Hull Daily Mail
“Sandy” Young, of Everton, Tottenham Hotspur, and Manchester City, has joined the South Liverpool F.C., (Lancashire Combination Club). The same club has signed Jack Taylor, the famous Everton centre half, who was damaged in the semi-final at Old Trafford in the match with Barnsley.

Young and Taylor
Hull Daily Mail-Wednesday 14 August 1912
"Sandy" Young, of Everton, Tottenham Hotspur, and Manchester City, has joined the South Liverpool F.C- (Lancashire Combination club) The same club has signed Jack Taylor, the famous ' Everton centre-half, who was damaged in the semi-final at Old Trafford in the match with Barnsley.

PINKNEY TO BARROW
August 17, 1912. The Liverpool Courier.
When Ernest Pinkney left a North of England and helped Everton in the month of April, it was though he would fill the position, then about to be vacated by Jack Sharp. However, he didn't live up to his early promise, he has just signed for a Barrow Association Club.

EVERTON'S FIRST PRACTICE MATCH.
August 24 1912 Express, Liverpool.
Smart play at Goodison.
Followers of the Everton Club turned up in goodly numbers at Goodison Park this afternoon for the first practice game. Although the ground was wet and slippery and the light had owing to the mist, which overhung the ground like a pall, some really interesting football was witnessed. The weavers of the Blues considered for the most part of Last year's League players, while the Stripes team included the latest recruits. The teams were: - Blues, Caldwell, goal, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (Captain), backs, Harris Fleetwood, and Grenyer, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, T. Browell, Bradshaw, and Uren, forwards. Stripes: - Hodge, goal, Holbem, and Laurie, backs, McCulloch, A. Browell, and Gourlay, half-backs, Smith, Gault, Murray, Graham, and Davidson, forwards.

At the opening exchanges the crowd were repeatedly roused to enthusiasm by the bright play of the Blues' forwards, their cleverness and footwork and effective combination, which characterized so many of their performances last year, being again in evidence. Beare and Jefferis soon found their proper stride, and it was a neat movement by the pair that led to Browell pouncing on the ball, dashing straight ahead, and scoring. Tommy almost secured a second soon afterwards, a straight shot striking one of the backs, full in the body. Uren next raised a cheer by one of his wriggling movements, which ended in the left winger giving Hodge a hard straight drive to get rid of. Smith and Gault worked well together on the right and McClulloch, the new right half-back was putting a lot of good work. Laurie at back was no match for the wily Beare. Tommy Browell.

Added a Second.
For the blues from a well placed centre by Uren. The character of the play was of a high order, and while it was the old players who most caught the eye several of the new men were giving a good account of themselves. The Stripes' keeper was having much more work to do than Caldwell. He saved cleverly from Harris, and a moment or two later he was applauded for keeping out a dangerous header by Browell. Davidson was most prominent with a clever sprint, and centre, which Hodge imposed of. Soon afterwards Graham missed an opening from a centre by Smith. Although goals were not plentiful, the spectators were being provided with capital football. Beare sprinted away in fine style, and from his centre Browell gave to Hodge a hot shot to stop. It was very pleasing to see MaConnachie in such trim, and Fleetwood also was giving a good account of himself. Half-time Blues 3, Stripes 0.

PRACTICE MATCH AT GOODISON
August 26, 1912. The Liverpool Courier.
EVERTON'S BRIGHT PROSPECTS.
Everything points to Everton having another successful season. This time last year, the practice games commenced their prospects were nothing like so bright as they are at present. Weakspots were remedied as this season advanced, and all the players who made the eleven such a powerful combination towards the end of the season are again available, and what is more they are all looking remarkably fit. In the opening practice game held at Goodison Park. On Saturday, many of the players did not exert themselves to the full, but still sufficient was shown to demonstrate that the Blues have an abundance of talents at their disposal this season. A change of custodian is always a matter of serious, but the general impression created on Saturday was that a most worthy successor has been found for William Scott in Caldwell, for while he had nothing near so much work to do as the junior custodian Hodge he made no mistake, and several of his saves called for hearty applause. Although five goals were scored against Hodge, he was by no means disappointing. He was often left completely at the mercury of Blues' sharp-shooters, and he made many fine saves.

THE DEFENCE.
The one doubtful position in the team is at right full back. Macconnachie left full-back, gives every promise of appearing at the best this coming season, but neither Stevenson nor Holbem come anywhere near the standard of efficiency, while Laurie, thew local youth, tried at full-back was far from reliable. One can well imagine there being some keen rivalry for one or two positions in the League team Beare for instance, will have to be on his best behaviour, so to speak, and J. Smith, who came from Hull with the Browell brothers will take the place. Beare showed all his old clever footwork on Saturday, but on the other hand, Smith put in a lot of good work. Then again, there is not much to choose between Uren and Davidson for the outside left possession. They both showed up well on Saturday, and Uren is an speedy as ever, and he get in many fine centres. It will be difficult to improve on Bradshaw and Jefferis for inside position on Saturday's form, and T. Browell's the young centre forward, is again full of promise. His shooting powers were demonstrated by the three goals he scored and the many times that he struck the crossbar or had likely shots charged down. Two of the most prominent players in Saturday's game were Harris and Fleetwood, while Grenyer also gave a good account of himself.

THE NEW MEN
Of the latest recruits, McCulloch, who belongs to Blantyre, should prove a serviceable right half. He is of the right stamp, fearless and sure in his tackling, and not lacking in judgement in placing to the forwards, Murray, who scored twice on Saturday, had many shortcomings, but some of his work was most praiseworthy; and Gault too, is a player of distinct promise, and Smith worked well together on the right wing, while Graham, at inside left, was by no means disappointing. Little need be said of the game itself. In the first half the play was fast and keen, but it slackened down considerably in the second half. The Blues team, which consisted for the most part of the season's League players were top-dog all through the game, and they finally won by five goals to two, Browell scoring three, and Jefferis and Grenyer one a piece. For the Stripes Murray scored both the their goals. The Teams: - Blues, Caldwell, goal, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (Captain), backs, Harris Fleetwood, and Grenyer, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, T. Browell, Bradshaw, and Uren, forwards. Stripes: - Hodge, goal, Holbem, and Laurie, backs, McCulloch, A. Browell, and Gourlay, half-backs, Smith, Gault, Murray, Graham, and Davidson, forwards.

EVERTON'S CURTAIN RASIED AT GOODISON.
August 26, 1912. Liverpool Express.
Blues- Supporters delighted.
By the Critic.
Everton, who held their first trials on Saturday, are in the fortunate positions of being able to command the same team which for the better half of Last season had the reputation of being one of the smartest combinations in League football. The large crowd that left Goodison Park after the Blues' first practice game on Saturday contained few, if any, grambles. It was in no cause a great game, and in parts was decidedly flat, still sufficient was shown to remove any doubts in the minds of the followers of the club as to the capabilities of the players. Whilst in no way wishing to disperance the work of the new men, the most gladdening fact, after all, was to see these players who did so well towards the end of last season, are in such fine trim. There were periods in the game when the spectators were roused to a high pitch of enthusiasm by the cleverness of footwork and deft passing on the one hand, and the fine back play of McConnachie and sound goalkeeping of the two new keepers, Caldwell and Hodge, on the other. A change of custodians is always a matter of serious moments, but the general impression was on Saturday was that a more worthy successor has been found for William Scott in Caldwell, for whilst he had nothing near so much work to do as the junior custodian Hodge, he made no mistakes, and several of his saves called for hearty applause's. Although five goals were scored against Hodge, he was by no means disappointing. He was often left completely at the mercy of the Blues' sharp-shooters, and he made many fine saves. The one doubtful position in the team is at right full-back. MaConnachie left full back gives every promise of appearing at his best this coming season, but neither Stevenson nor Holbem come anywhere near his standard of efficiency, while Laurie, the local youth assist at full-back was far from reliable. One can well imagine there being some keen rivalry for one or two position in the League team. Beare for instance, will have to be on his best behavior so to speak of J. Smith, who came from Hull with the Browell brothers, will take his place, Beare showing all his old clever footwork on Saturday, but on the other hand, Smith put in a lot of good work. Then again, there is not much to choose between Uren and Davidson for the outside left position. They both showed up well on Saturday, and Uren is an speedy as ever, and his got in many fine centres. It will be difficult to improve on Bradshaw and Jefferis for the inside positions on Saturday's form and T. Browell, the young centre forward, is again full of promise. His shooting powers were demonstrated by the three goals he scored and the many times he struck the crossbar or had likely shots charged down. Two of the most consistent players in Saturday's game were Harris and Fleetwood, while Grenyer and A. Browell always gave a good account of themselves.

WILLIAM WATTS
Nottingham Evening Post - Thursday 29 August 1912
William Watts, of Kilamarsh, left yesterday to join the Everton Club. Last season he played for Staveley, his previous clubs being Kiveton and Killamarsh Institutes. Watts is only 20.

PRACTICE MATCH AT GOODISON.
August 29, 1912. The Liverpool Courier.
AN ENCOURAGING DISPLAY.
About 5,000 spectators witnessed the second practice match at Goodison Park, last night, and the team chosen to represent Everton at Tottenham in the opening League match on Monday next justified their selection by beating the reserves eleven by six goals to three. Last season's League players, without unduly exerting themselves, did not fail to demonstrate their general fitness for the ensuing campaign. The side as a whole worked together with harmony, the forwards and halves shoing that complete understanding which marked so many of their displays last season. Browell did score one beautiful goal, but the chief honours in this respect went to Bradshaw who showed his aptitude for goalgetting by scoring five of the six goals secured by the “Blues.” It is not too much to say that the League team did not reveal a single weak spot. Makepeace appeared none the worse for his many wet experience in the cricket field, entering into the rigour of the winter pastime with all his old zest. Caldwell, the new custodian again created a favourable impression, and Macconnachie once again showed his great worth in defence. Everton's present problem of scoring one or two capable reserve backs is still unsolved. A trial was given to a junior back from the Redcar district ramed Simpson, who on Saturday turned out with Bradford City. He did one or two smart things, but later on the whole of his performance was only moderate. Of the reserve players, Chedgzoy and Gault deserve special mention. They were a most effective right wing showing neat passing, and bright precision in front of goal. Graham also gave a good account of himself on the left wing, and Grenyer put in a lot of useful work at left half-back.

BRADHSAW SCORES FIVE GOALS.
The game opened with the Stripes in determined mood, and for a time they more than held his own. Chedgzoy and Gault were early prominent with neat passing, and it was one of their movements which led to Graham opening the score. The League team, although never showing real energy, worked together with bright precision. A well-placed centre by Uren ended in Browell taking the ball on the run, and with unerring judgement he drove into the net. There was nothing noteworthy about the next two goals scored by Bradhsaw (1 from a penalty kick). But Grenyer was deservedly applauded for his shot, which gave the Stripes their second goal. The play in the second half, as in the earlier stages, was fairly evenly contested. One incident worthy of note was two capital saves by Caldwell during a hot scrimmage in the goalmouth. Bradshaw added two more goals for the Blues, and Gault a third for the Stripes, the League team thus winning by six goals to three. The teams are : - Blues: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (Captain), backs, Harris, Fleetwood, and Makepeace, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, and Uren, forwards. Stripes: - Hodge, goal, Holbem, and J. Simpson, backs, McCulloch, A. Browell, and Grenyer, half-backs, Chedgzoy, Gault, Murray, Graham, and Davidson, forwards.

FOOTBALL OPENS
August 31, 1912. Express Liverpool.
By the Critic.
A good start is always appreciated by the clubs, and you may depend on it, that the players well be as keen as mustard to bring about victory for their respective clubs on Monday. Locally of course chief interest will be centred in the doings of Everton at Tottenham. The match in London, however, is the one which strikes (!) me as likely to be “the” opening “tit-bit.” Everton are a curious club. Probably that fact has never been more exemplified than last season. When they appeared to have the League Championship in their grasp they made two or three blunders and the championship slipped from their grasp once again. A few years ago the same thing happened, and Everton are still waiting for their second championship success. Will it come this season? Hope springs eternal, etc. There is no doubt that the “Blues” have a good side. They played good football last season, and with the majority of the men available, the side is likely to show to advantage. Of course, one must wait events until the team is seen in actual warfare. Until them no reliable opinion can be formed.

Everton a Strong Side.
On paper the side appears to be exceptionally strong both in attack and defence, and providing the players work together as one man there is no reason why the combination should not be successful. The forwards as all followers of the game know are exceptionally smart. At outside right Beare as perhaps on the small side, but what he lacks in inches he makes up for in pluck and the determination, whilst his speed and ability to centre the ball at a nice angle makes the little man an opponent to be respected. Jefferis at inside right is one of the cleverest exponents of the day, and the fact that he is a well-preserved player enables him to stand the warmest pace. Then young Browell is a smart as ever as a sharp shooter, and Bradshaw demonstrated in the practice match that he is in his best scoring form.

The Defence.
Uren will do well if he will only vary his methods a bit. The halves are a business like trio, and the defence ought to remain sound. At the same time one would welcome another first class defender or two. I understand that the negotiation between Everton and Preston North End, regarding the transfer of Houldsworth have fallen through, and this clever half-back is not now likely to be seen at the Park. He would have proved a useful addition to the staff, but of course there is a limit to transfer fees. Even following for the fact that Everton are to appear away from home the “Blues” I fancy will open the season with a victory. The Spurs' are not regarded as a strong side, but at the same time if Young, the centre, gets going he may easily make it warm for Caldwell. As a rule the Toffees are usually seen to advantage against the ‘Spurs' and there is no reason why they should not claim at least a point on this occasion. Personally, however, I fancy the “Blues” will win. I may be wrong, but it is my opinion that Everton is the stronger side. The teams chosen to duty duty are: - Everton: - Caldwell; Stevenson, and MaConnachie; Harris, Fleetwood, and Makepeace; Beare, Jefferis, Browell (T), Bradshaw, and Uren. Tottenham chosen from Lunn; Collins, Brittan; Jones, Griomsdell, Lightfoot, Darnell; Tattern, Minter, Young, Bliss, Middlemiss. The kick off is timed for 5.30 and arrangement have been to publish the result of the match in a special edition of the “Express. immediately the final whistle is sounded.

SEPTEMBER 1912

TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR v. EVERTON.
Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer - Tuesday 03 September 1912
Played at Tottenham, yesterday, before 20.000 spectators. Adapting themselves better to the condition. Evertton had the better of the opening exchangee, and Lunn was called upon save many fine shot, from Harris and Browell. After time the 'Spurs improved, controlling the lively ball better, but although they got dangerous several times, Everton defence was keen. Browell scored a fine goal. Half-time. Everton 1 goal, Tottenham Hotspur none. The light was failing fast when the game was resumed. Tottenham attacked warmlv, and Minter twice came near equalising. The Everton halves played finely, giving their forwards chances. Browell got through, but was fouled by Brittain, and Macconachie scored from the resultant penalty. The Everton continued hold the upper hand, playing splendid football. Result: —Everton 2 goals, Tottenham Hotspur none.

CALDWELL SAVES FINELY FOR EVERTON.
Dundee Courier -Tuesday 03 September 1912
Everton, 2; Tottenham Hotspur, 0.
During the opening stages Everton exerted such pressure that Bradshaw nearly scored. The home backs had a lively time, for Everton did better together, and Collins at back did finely. Each side forced a corner, Caldwell saving well from Young. The Spurs attacked, but at half-time Everton had scored through Browell, and led 1-0. At the opening of the second half Hotspur pressed vigorously, Caldwell saving well from Middlemiss at close quarters, and then defending two corners. Everton took a further lead when Maoonncchie scored from penalty. The home defence had warm time against a better team, Lurrn being kept very busy. The home halves were not quick enough for the stylish lot of forwards, who played grandly.

TOTTENHAM HOTSPURS 0 EVERTON 2
September 3, 1912. The Liverpool Courier.
EVERTON'S BRILLIANT VICTORY.
CLEVER DISPLAY AT TOTTENHAM
Playing exceedingly clever football at Tottenham last evening, Everton gained a well deserved victory over the Spurs by 2 goals to nil. There was plenty of enthusiasm exhibited by a crowd of upwards of 20,000, who must have very disappointed at the poor form shown by the Metropolis team. The margin of goals does not by any means show the true superiority of the visitors, for in general tactics, both in attack and defence they clearly proved that they were the more capable footballers individual and collectively. Everton played football which was high class from beginning to end, and the magnificence of their half-backs' play were a long way towards bringing about the complete discomfiture of the Spurs. Who at no period in the game appeared quite capable of bring able to do sufficient good work to warrant the scoring of a goal. The Spurs always fought bravely during the first half, but their methods were of such individual character that it was the easiest thing imaginable for the visitors to define their intentions and throughout the whole game Caldwell was not asked to negotiate a shot that could be considered to be dangerous.

CONVINCING FORWARD WORK.
Everton's form must at all events be quite satisfactory for an opening game. The Forwards, it is true, only registered a single goal up at the interval, but their work had been so convincing that it was obvious that the home goal could not keep on escaping as it did. Lunn did excellent work in the Hotspur goal, was he had a really clever pair of backs operating in front of him in Collins and Brittain, but at half-back Tottenham were quite outclassed. Where the Everton men excelled was the quickness with which they made ground. The forwards trapped the passes that the half-backs delivered, and no time was wasted before the opposing goal was reached. Browell had a couple of really good openings given him in the first ten minutes, but he was handicapped in having to turn quickly, and this robbed his shots from being powerfully directed. Uren was probably the most dangerous of the visitors' forwards, simply because he nearly always did the correct thing for an extreme wing player to go. That is, he centred at every available opportunity. His centre too, were mostly accurate and he owed a lot of his success to the skilful manourving and passing of Bradshaw, Jefferis was equally successful in getting the best work out of Beare, but in point of effectiveness it was the methodical play of the Everton inside forwards that provided the chief incidents in the game.

THRILLING ESCAPES FOR ‘SPURS.
The Sours' gaol underwent some thrilling escapes, and none more so than when Harris sent up a shot from 20 yards range that Lunn disposed of beautifully. The Spurs' custodian misjudged a centre from Beare soon afterwards but Browell with half a chance, just failed to direct the ball into the untenanted net. Previous to Everton opening the scoring two minutes prior to the interval Bradshaw missed the best scoring opportunity that occurred during the game. He had snapped up a pass from Uren and worked himself into a splendid position, but to the general surprise of the spectators he completely miskicked in his attempts to shoot. The goal that followed was the result of a particularly clever piece of football and quite in keeping with the methods when Everton had employed. Jefferis started the movement with a fine pass to Beare, who transferred back to Harris when challenged by Britton. The half-back lost no time in pursing the ball forward to Browell, who was wanting and in a second the centre-forward and scored the opening goal of the season with an unstoppable shot. Everton had more than deserved their lead when the interval arrived, and soon after resuming Lunn made an extra ordinary save from Browell from a shot fully 25 yards out. The custodian just succeeded in tapping the ball over the crossbar.

PENALTY GOAL BY MACCONNACHIE.
Browell that the Everton scored came, midway in the second from another clever burst it half. He was obviously pushed off the ball by Brittan, the Tottenham back, and the referee had no hesitation in giving a penalty kick . Macconnachie took the kick, and before entering the net the ball struck the underneath part of the crossbar, which of course gave Lunn no chance of saving. Tottenham were always well beaten in the second half and it was only because their half-backs were so poor that the forwards failed to play together. Little was seen of the new centre forward. Young and the play, and the play of a whole side was a long way behind what will be required to keep the team in the League. Grimsdel and Tattersall, two players secured from Watford last year were also very moderate performers. Next to the splendid play of the visitors halfbacks there was noting finer in the game than the play of Macconnachie. He was seldom guilty of a mistake in tackling, and the accuracy of his kicking frequently brought loud cheers from a keen crowd, who were quickly to applauded the clever tactics of the visitors. It was always a quick open game with plenty of incidents, and was undoubtedly a complete honour for the Everton men. Teams : - Tottenham Hotspurs: - Lynn, goal, Collins, and Brittan, backs, Darnell, Minterl, Grimsdel, and Lightfoot, half-backs, Tattersall, Minter, Young, Bliss, and Middleton, forwards. Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (Captain), backs, Harris, Fleetwood, and Makepeace, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, and Uren, forwards. Referee Wilkes.

STOCKPORT COUNTY RESERVES 2 EVERTON RESERVES 4
September 3, 1912. The Liverpool Courier.
CENTRAL LEAGUE (Game 1)
Stockport County opened their season with a game with Everton Reserves at Stockport. Everton pressed at the outset, but the County improved Cook opened the score and recorded a second for them from a penalty. Smart combination by Everton troubled the Stockport defence, and Graham and Gault recorded goals, the scores being level at the interval. In the second half Everton played strongly, and often troubled the County defence. Murray scoring early on, and this was followed by a fourth (Gault). The County attacked with determination towards the close, and in the failing light Everton defence luckily survived on several occasions. The game was fast throughout . Everton: - Hodge, goal, Holbem, and Laurie, backs, McCulloch, A.Browell, and Grenyer, half-backs, Smith, Gault, Murray, Graham, and Davidson, forwards.

SIMPSON ENGAGED.
September 3, 1912. Express Liverpool
Everton have signed J. Simpson the young back from Redcar district, who came to Everton on trial. He has shown much promise, and Everton decided to engage him. Although on the small side he displays correct judgement in tackling.
Promising Young “Blues.”

Blues 5 Stripes 3
Everton directors will have no difficulty in picking a very good “A” team from the 22 players, which took part in the trial game on Saturday. The Stripes led at the commencement by 2 goals to nil, but the Blues better-balanced side had reversed the position at half-time by 4 goals to 2, and ultimately won by 5 to 3. The attack on both sides was superior to the defence and the “Blues” were better served at half-back. Murray led his men and always seemed to have the measure of his opponents. His inside partner Watts, did many good things, and Wild in goal could hardly be blamed for the shots that beat him. The Stripes forwards combined well and took the ball in before releasing shots, whereas the Blues often nullified good movements by shooting from too long a distance. The feature of the afternoon's play, however, was the work of the stripes' right wings Hampson and Craige. The former at outside right was excellent and Craige, inside, undoubtedly has the right idea. These two men if signed on, should earn promotion, and as they both have youth on their side, I can confidently predict their making a name for themselves in the football world. Craige who is not yet 21, has already appeared in good football, having played for North Shields against such clubs as Newcastle 2 nd and Sunderland 2 nd , and he has also played inside to the great Rutherford. He is now living here and following his work as a Smith in one of our steamship engine works. Jack Hampson has only been playing football three years. Last season figuring with Ormskirk and the previous season with St. Helens Recs. He is only 19, 5ft 5ins in height but he is sturdily built and weights 10st 2lbs, and has good speed. He is a nice unassuming lad, and should become a great favourite.

Trial play.
The trial match on Saturday was an interesting one the spectators being highly pleased with the showing of some of the men. The Scott's brothers was seen to advantage, and many of his saves were really good. Most of the men were playing keen football. It does not speak well for the “Reds” however, that they failed with two penalties Goddard failed to defeat Campbell and Lacey also had a try without avail. It was not until the second half that the Blues livened up, the “Whites” being smart.

EVERTON'S TRIUMPH.
September 3, 1912. Liverpool Express.
“Blues” Clever Display.
A Fine Combination.
By The Critic.
The whistle has sounded, and the race is in progress. Everton got off to a really fine start, and the “Blues” highly pleased their friends by the magnificent display at Tottenham last evening. As would be gathered from the graphic report and comments printed in the special edition of the “Express” last evening (Record Office did not have) -which by the way, was far in advance of all competition –the Merseyside representatives were complete masters of the situation throughout the game, and the roughly deserved their victory. There was no fluke about the win either, as John MaConnachie and his men were the superior side at all points. The forwards and halves were alike perfect, and it is generally acknowledged that on that form the “Blues” would have beaten any team. Of course, it is early yet to prophesy, and the calibre of the Spurs must not be overestimated but at the same time there is no denying that the “Blues” have made a decidedly encouraging start, and if such form is maintained Everton will again climb high on the ladder.

Delightful Play.
Their play was delightfully crisp and some of the movements between the halves and forwards denoted the perfect football machine, working smoothly and with every move behaving a direct object in view. It was pleasing to watch the methods with which the men worked into one another's hands, and at a first glance I quite believe that the team will develop into an even more trustful combination than last season. The forwards were neat and clean in nearly everything they did the three inside men giving glimpses of that ability which we know them to passes. Tom Browell thus early has shown that he retains all the skill and shooting ability, which has made him famous, and two or three of his shots were the acme of precision and accuracy. His goal was a neat effort, whilst he might easily have added a second had not Britton infringed the penalty rule, and the captain was able to do the trick.

Macconnachie as a Marksman.
On previous occasions I have written of MaConnachie's ability as a marksmen, and the captain is now looked on as the team's penalty expert. When a member of the Hibs, “Mac” frequently figured in the list of scorers from centre half, and from the time he started taking penalties for Everton I do not believe he has made a mistake. We can depend on accuracy in this direction from the Everton captain. He played a capital game last evening, his fine judgement in coping with the advances of the ‘Spurs' forwards being really good. All round it was a most satisfactory display, and the appearance of the “Blues” at home will be awaited with the keenness possible interest. Let us hope the “Blues” will go on as they have commenced.

‘Spurs Outclassed.
Our special representative who attended the match, in the course of his comments says the margin of goals does not by any means, show the true superiority of the visitors, for in general tactics, both in attack and defence, they clearly proved that they were the more capable footballers individually and collectively. Everton played football that was high class from beginning to end, and the magnificence of their half-backs play went a long way towards bringing about the complete discomfiture of the ‘Spurs, who at no period in the game appeared quite capable of being able to do sufficient good work to warrant the scoring of a goal. The Sours always fought bravely during the first half, but their methods were of such individual character that it was the easiest thing imaginable for the visitors to define their intentions, and throughout the whole game, Caldwell was not asked to negotiate a shot that could be considered to be dangerous.

Fine Halves.
Everton's form must at all events be quite satisfactory for an opening game. The forwards, it is true only registered a single goal up to the interval, but their work had been so convincing that it was obvious that the home goal could not keep on escaping as it did. Lunn did excellent work in the Hotspur goal, and he had a really clever pair of backs operating in front of him in Collins and Brittan, but at half-back Tottenham were quite outclassed. Where the Everton most excelled was the quickness with which they made ground. The forwards trapped the passes that the half-backs delivered, and no time was wasted before the opposing goal was reached. Browell had a couple of really good openings given him in the first ten minutes, but he was handicapped in having to turn quickly, and this robbed his shots from being powerfully directed. Uren was probably the most dangerous of the victors' forwards, simply because he nearly always did the correct thing for an extreme wing player to do. That is, he centred at every available opportunity. His centres too, were mostly accurate, and he owed a lot of his success to the skilful manceuring and passing of Bradshaw. Jefferis was equally successful in getting the best work out of Beare. The ‘Spurs were beaten all to pieces fore and aft.

EVERTON AT AYESOME PARK.
September 6, 1912. Liverpool Express.
Everton's chance.
By the Critic.
Everton must travel to Ayresome Park, and judging from the reports of the Albion v Middlesbrough it would seem that the northern team play rather vigorous football, so that Everton must beware. The “Blues” however, are clever if not possessed of too much weight and they may be depended to hold their own. A win tomorrow would indeed be pleasant, but I would advise the forwards not to be too elaborate in their tactics. A well known enthusiast who witnessed the “Blues” display at Tottenham thought they overdid the dribbling business and kept the ball too close and against a cleverer defence would not have had all their own way. Such defenders as McLead and Weir are not to be trifled with in this way, and these sturdy individuals will require a vast amount of beating. The Borough have made one change in their team from that which visited West Bromwich. Barker taking Fraser's place. The teams chosen are as follows: - Everton; Caldwell; Stevenson McConnachie; Harris, Fleetwood, and Makepeace; Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, and Uren. Middlesbrough; Williamson; McLeod, and Weir; Parker, Carr, and Varill; Stirling, Elliott, Brown, Windridge and Eyre.

EVERTON
(A draw 0-0 last season).
September 7, 1912. Liverpool Express.
Blues at Ayresome Park.
Terrific Pace.
Fine Footwork by Visiting Halves.
A Goalless Draw.
By Rover.
Probably no club in the League has had a more arduous task thus far than Everton. Away engagements with Tottenham and the Tee-siders are exacting enough at any period, but following upon the team's success at White Hart lane, the followers of the “Blues” looked hopefully forward to the result of the encounter this afternoon. The players, in charge of Messar Whitford, Allman and Coffey, left Liverpool last evening, and made their headquarters at Darlington, which was reached shortly after nine o'clock. A quiet evening at one of the local halls was followed by a leisurely morning, and the party arrived at Middlesbrough in good time for the match. The weather was all that could be desired for a capital exhibition of football, and as the local side had failed at West Bromwich, during the week there was every indication that they would fully extend themselves in their first home engagement. There was a change from the side that carried full points away from Tottenham, and the Everton players were hopeful of a least repeating their partial success of last season at Aryrsome Park. . Teams: - Middlesbrough: - Williamson (captain), goal, McLeod, and Weir, backs, Barker, Carr, and Verrill, half-backs, Stirling, Elliott, Brown, Windridge, and Eyre, forwards. Everton: - Caldwell, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (Captain), backs, Harris Fleetwood, and Makepeace, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, and Uren, forwards. Referee P. Sent, Barnsley
It will be noticed that there was but one change on the home side from that which was defeated at the Hawthorns, Fraser who was hurt, giving place to Duguid at right half.

The Game.
There would be about fifteen thousand spectators present when the teams took up their position. There was a slight end-to-end breeze, and Williamson was favoured in winning the toss. It was early apparent that the spectators were to enjoy a storming game for the pace was at once terrific, and for some little time the scene of operations was mostly in Everton half. Brown frequently led his men on in promising style and on Eyre closing in disaster looked certain until Stevenson came to the rescue. However, the home forwards kept up a vigorous attack, and Caldwell was called upon to save a shot from Windridge, while a moment later a strong drive from Vervill also commanded the best work from the Everton keeper. Subsequently MaConnachie and Harris executed some neat defensive work, which led to Beare and Jefferis making away. However, the home defenders were equal to the occasion and after McLeon and Weir had kept the Everton van out in turn. A strong movement led to a corner against MaConnachie. Makepeace was in at the rescue, and during the next few minutes Everton's inside men displayed commendable footwork, which called for the best work of the Borough halves. However, Beare managed to make further headway and was going strongly when Verill came under the ban of the referee, and following the free kick Uren headed into Williamson's hands. There could be no mistaking the earnestness of both sides and the terrific pace set up at the start was well maintained. Following one movement of the home forwards Brown looked like racing clean through from a pass by Duguid, when Stevenson took the ball from his toe and failing to get it away Fleetwood rusher to the scene and saved the situation. Next followed a marvellous escape of the Everton goal, as Eyre found an opening for Brown who was quite unmarked. The centre forward however, overran the ball, but it went to Stirling who with a terrific shot shivered the crossbar and the ball rebounded into play. It was a great escape, and the players settled down again, Browell raced off, and luckily defeating the opposing halves he was making for goal when McLeod was successful in his challenge and the Middlesbrough forwards were again in possession. The Everton forwards were not at all convincing in their movements just now, though Brown getting possession from Jefferis worked into a good position, and as the backs were beaten he should have scored. As it was his weak effort went yards wide. Another bombardment in which Elliott played prominent part called the Everton defenders much anxiety, and fortunately efforts from Brown and Windridge were charged down by Fleetwood and Stevenson, though a moment later Windridge rushed through and only missed by inches with a fast rising shot. Breaking away, Browell tested Williamson again, but the keeper's anticipation was correct, while at the other end Elliott was only a trifle wide with a header. Eventually the Blues got into a promising stride, and, following several exchanges, in which Bradshaw, Jefferis, and Browell were concerned, the ball was placed for Beare, who however, finished by lifting over the bar. Following Uren made a couple of futile advances and then forced a corner, which, however, was cleared. Everton's outside left found Stirling a great obstacle, and after another smart skirmish the Reds went off in irresistible fashion. First Fleetwood charged down.

A Terrific Drive from Brown,
and after Elliott had attempted to place through MaConnachie this time saved the situation. In the close following the skipper practically on the goalline kept out a terrific shot from M. Stirling at a time when Caldwell was helpless. It had been an anxious time for Everton, and the crowd were not tardy recognizing the defensive strength of the Blues. Caldwell had to come out to save from Windridge following which, Bradshaw and Uren made an incursion, but could not enact quarter from the Boro' backs, and a further effort just towards the interval met with a better success.

Half-Time Middlesbrough 0 Everton 0
It had been a hard fought first half with Middlesbrough the more aggressive side. This was mainly due to the smart work of the home half-backs, who were alive to every movement of the Everton inside forwards and never relaxed their efforts in making the Blues part with the ball. In addition to the home halves plied their forwards who were generally nippy and on more than one occasion looked like opening the score. . Towards the interval the Boro' forwards were very forceful in their methods and were unlucky in not opening the scoring. The Everton forwards were somewhat disjointed in their movements and were not nearly so virile as their opponents when they reached close quarters, and it was fortunate that there was no slackness in the rear division. . Everton attacked strongly and after fine footwork all along the line Bradshaw skimmed the bar. Uren later tested Williamson, the keeper also luckily charging down from Browell in the goalmouth. Everton was now prominent. Willaimson being tested in turn by Beare, Jeffeis and Bradshaw.

Final Result Middlesbrough 0 Everton 0

EVERTON RES V. BARNSLEY RES.
September 7, 1912. Liverpool Express.
The opening match of the season took place at Goodison Park in the presence of about 3000 spectators. Teams: - Everton: - Hodge, goal; Simpson and Holbem, backs; McCulloch, A. Browell (captain) and Grenyer, half-backs; Chedgzoy, Gault, Murray, Graham, and Davidson forwards. Barnsley: - Lindon, goal; Hull and Tundall, backs; Spencer, Barson and Musgrave, half-backs; Mitchell, Rawlinge, Hunter, McCann, and Newton, forwards . The visitors were first to assume the aggressive, and Rawling executed a neat dribble and centred nicely into the goalmouth, where Browell cleverly intercepted and removed the danger. The first shot of the match came from the foot of Gault who worked well for a position, but shot wide. A dangerous centre by Gault spell danger for Barnsley but unfortunately for the homesters Davidson's shot cannoned off Graham out of play. The Blues continued to have the best of matters, and Gault who was

Showing Splendid Form,
Sent in a fine shot, which Lindon neatly turned around the post for a corner. As usual Davidson place the flag kick with wonderful accuracy and Murray meeting the ball with his head, sent it towards goal, but Lindon again saved the situation. The Barnsley right wing made a dangerous incursion to the home territory, where the fair haired Simpson proved his worth by saving an awkward situation. The Blues were soon attacking again and Gault again

Tried to Capture
The Barnsley goal, but Lindon once again accomplished a wonderful save. Everton were much the better team but all their efforts to score proved unavailing. Gault was the most conspicuous of the home vanguard, but he experienced ill-luck in his efforts to score. Barnsley them had a big slice of luck, for Simpson had a very feeble effort to tackle Hunter, when in possession, and the visitors centre ran close in and easily scored. From the centre kick Everton went away, and Gault in a powerful drive, which Linden turned over the bar for an abortive corner. A well judged pass by Browell enabled Graham to try a shot, but Lindon made a wonderful full-length save. A fine centre by Chedgzoy was headed in by Murray and the ball was

Sailing into the Net
When Hall pulled it out with his hand, and from the ensuing penalty king Gault equalised. Of the new players McClulloch happened to be the most successful, for Graham was very slow, and Simpson at times was unreliable. Half-time Everton 1, Barnsley 1. Final Everton 2, Barnsley 2.

MIDDLEBBROUGH v. EVERTON.
Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer - Monday 09 September 1912
Middlesbrough, before 15,000 spectators. The weather fine and the ground splendid trim. A magnificent contest witnessed. Middlesbrough being the more virile and dangerous in front of goal. Caldwell saved brilliantly thrice from Windridge and Macconnachie and once from Stirling. Everton were poor front of goal, Williamson having little do. interval—Middlebrough none, Everton none. The second half generally was a tame character, with Everton, if anything, the superior side. They could do everything but score, the shooting being very faulty. Williamson had his anxious moments, notably when he picked up from Bradshaw and Browell on the line. Middlesbrough's inside men were slow, and several smart centres went a begging. Result ; Middlesbrough none, Everton none.

MIDDLESBROUGH 0 EVERTON 0
September 9, 1912. The Liverpool Courier.
EVERTON'S BRILLIANT START.
NO GOALS AT MIDDLESBROUGH.
It falls to the fortunate of few clubs to secure points at the opening of the season on opponent's grounds, and as the Everton players obtained three of a possible four within a week they may be said to have commenced the campaign in distinctly promising fashion. Some five seasons ago they surprised the football world by winning their opening engagements at Woolwich and Bristol within three days with an aggregate of six clever goals. This is on the records as one of their most notable achievements, and their performances during the past week must also rank among the best feats of the club. On Monday last they trounced the ‘Spurs at Tottenham by two clear goals, and followed this at Middlesbrough on Saturday by sharing the honours in a strenuous game. What more could the most expectant supporters of the Goodison-road brigade desire? Surely their cup of rejoicing is filled to overflowing. It would however, be a mistake, remarkable as these early successes are, to run away with the idea that Everton are likely to prove all powerful. Of this there are no qualms as regards either the directors or the players. Both are perfectly well aware how exceedingly arduous is the struggle to achieve championship honours, and how equally balanced have the clubs in the League becomes. The executive of the club on the one hand are desirous, as they have always been, of showing every consideration to their servants, while the players are determined to given of their best. This is as it should be, and the rest may be players are determined to given of their best. This is as it should be, and the rest may be safely entrusted to the keenly critical supporters in and around the district.

SOME IMPRESSIONS.
It could scarcely be said of the game at Ayresome Park on Saturday that the play reached the highest standard or that it a roused the intense excitement which is usually distinctive of really great struggle. For all that, it was always interesting and both sides at times experienced the vilest of luck. Local enthusiasts are perfectly well acquitted with the abilities possessed by the forwards, and probably it came as a surprise to them that the Middlesbrough defer, was not punctuated. It was a near thing on more than one occasion, but failure to do themselves full justice may be accounted for by a lack of concerned movement with the half-backs as the result of Fleetwood having strained the muscles of his leg when the game had been in progress ten minutes. With the key of the situation weakened it can readily be imagined that the ban were not as frequently aggressive as is their went; still for all that there was the hall-mark of class in their occasional advances, and had conditions been normal they must assuredly have been their presence felt. Despite the disability under which the centre-half labored, there was but little deterioration from the high standard usually attained by the middle lines, and back play left little room for adverse criticism. One point was distinctly apparent, and that was that the players had attended well to their training, and the value of this all-important feature was fully demonstrated in the first portion of the game, when the home forwards set a terrific pace. The "Blues” held up well, and afterwards demonstrated their superior fitness by dominating the movements of play during the greater portion of the second half.

CONCERNING THE PLAYERS.
A goalless draw was the result, and, singularly enough, neither team found the net in the corresponding game of last season. There were, however, several narrow escapes, and probably none more so than when Williamson anticipated some smart finishing by the left wing and prevented Browell from scoring when placed only placed only a few yards off the net. The Everton forwards though not brilliant put in much good work. They were opposed to halves, who in the first stages were successful in breaking up tactics and having got their measure during the second period must have scored but for excellent keeping of Williamson. Jefferis was clever, and with Beare formal a successful right wing, while at the other end Uren especially in the later stages put in several fine touches that looked like leading up to a tangible point. Bradshaw was always in the thick of the fray, but was out of luck, and Browell carefully shadowed by Carr, the home centre half was not allowed much scope. Harris was the most successful of the halves, though Makepeace gave no quarter and while Stevenson was a bit shaky early on, the skipper maintained a stolid defence all though, and on one occasion cleverly kept a ball out when Caldwell was beaten. The keeper did all that was required in business like style, and all round little exception could be taken to the display of the side. For Middlesbrough Williamson demonstrated that he has not lest any of his old cleverness and while McLeod and Weir generality defended well. Carr at centre half in, addition to keeping an eye on Browell, attended well to his forwards of whom Stirling, Ellwit, and Windridge, were capable marksmen. Teams: - Middlesbrough: - Williamson (captain), goal, McLeod, and Weir, backs, Barker, Carr, and Verrill, half-backs, Stirling, Elliott, Brown, Windridge, and Eyre, forwards. Everton: - Caldwell, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (Captain), backs, Harris Fleetwood, and Makepeace, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, and Uren, forwards. Referee P. Sent, Barnsley

EVERTON RESERVES 2 BARNSLEY RESERVES 2
September 9, 1912. The Liverpool Courier.
CENTRAL LEAGUE (Game 2)
The opening game at Goodison park was drawn, each side scoring two goals. Everton had rather the better of the opening play, and the Barnsley goal had several narrow escapes. Gault made gallant attempts to find the net, but Landen who kept a magnificent goal frustrated all his efforts. An attack by the visitors resulted in Hunter scoring, but Gault equalising from a penalty. After charging ends, Mitchell again gave Barnsley the lead, and two minutes from time A. Browell equalised from one of Davidson's accurately placed flag kicks. Gault was the cleverest and most dangerous forward on the field, while Davidson gave a creditable display, but he was poorly supported. Graham being altogether too slow, Browell at centre gave a finished display, and Holbem's full back play was beyond reproach. Barnsley are a sturdy lot of players, and what they lack in the finer points of the game is fully made up by their doggedness and enthusiasm. Everton: - Hodge, goal, Holbem, and Simpson, backs, McCulloch, A. Browell, and Grenyer, half-backs, Chedgzoy, Gault, Murray, Graham, and Davidson, forwards. Barnsley: - Lindon, goal, Hall, and Tindall, backs, Spencer, Barson, and Musgroves, half-backs, Mitchell, Rawling, Hunter, McCann, and Newton, forwards.

BLUES' GOOD START.
September 9, 1912. Liverpool Express
Although Everton did not complete our jubilation by winning at Middlesbrough, they did the next best thing shared the points. To obtain three points out of four on opponents' ground is a decidedly meritorious performance, and the record says much for the cleverness of the team. The start reminds one of the triumphs down south a couple of season's ago, when the “Blues” defeated the ‘Spurs and Bristol, and won at Middlesbrough. “Rovers,” who attended the match at Ayresome Park, in the course of his comments, says: - It would be a mistake, remarkable as these early successes are to run away with the idea that Everton are likely to prove all powerful. Of this there are no qualms as regards either the directors or the players. Both are perfectly well aware how exceedingly arduous is the struggle to achieve championship honours, and how equally balanced have the clubs in the League become. The executive of the club on the one hand are desirous as they have always been of showing every consideration to the servants while the players are determined to give of their best. This is as it should be, and the rest may be safely entrusted to the keenly critical supporters in and around the district.

Some Impressions.
It could scarcely be said of the game as Ayresome Park on Saturday that the play reached the highest standard or that it aroused the intense excitement, which is usually distinctive or really great struggles. For all that, it was always interesting, and both kicks at time experienced the vilest of luck. Local enthusiasts are perfectly well acquainted with the abilities possessed by the forwards, and probably it came as a surprise to them that the Middlesbrough defence was not penetrated. It was a near thing no more than one occasion, but failure to do themselves full justice may be accounted for by a lack of concerned movement with the half-backs at the result of Fleetwood having strained the muscles of his leg when the game had been in progress ten minutes. With the key of the situation weakened, it can thus readily be imagined that the van were not as frequently aggressive as is their wont; still for all that there was the hail-mark of class in their occasional advances, and had conditions been normal –they must assuredly have made their presence felt. Despite the disability under which the centre-half laboured there was but little deterioration from the high standard usually attained by the middle lines, and back play left little room for adverse criticism. One point was distinctly apparent, and that was that the players had attended well to their training and the value of this all-important feature was fully demonstrated in the first portion of the game, when the home forward set a terrific pace. The “Blues” held it well, and afterwards demonstrated the superior fitness by dominating the movements of play during the greater portion of the second half.

Players Who Shone.
The Everton forwards though not brilliant, put in much good work. They were opposed to halves who in the first stage were successful in breaking up tactics and having got their measures, during the second period must have scored but for the excellent keeping of Williamson. Jefferis was clever, and with Beare formed a successful right wing, while at the other end Uren, especially in the later stages put in several find touches that looked like leading up to a tangible point. Bradshaw was always in the thick of the fray, but was out of luck and Browell, carefully shadowed by Carr, the home centre-half was not allowed much scope. Harris was the most successful of the halves, though Makepeace gave no quarter, and while Stevenson was a bit shaky early on the skipper maintained a solid defence all through, and on one occasion cleverly kept a ball out when Caldwell was beaten. The keeper did all that was required in business-like style, and all round little deception could be taken to the display of the side.

SANDY YOUNG
Dundee Evening Telegraph - Wednesday 11 September 1912
" Sandy " Young, who was Scotland's centre forward against England in 1905 while with Everton F.C.. iS at present playing havoc with custodians. He joined South Liverpool this season, and last Saturday against Barnoldswick he scored three goals, while last night he credited himself with two more against Portsmouth Rovers. South Liverpool, who also boast of " Jocky" Taylor at half-back, should not, at any rate, be the bottom of the Lancashire Combination Second Division table next April.

EVERTON RESERVES 1 PRESTON RESERVES 2
September 12, 1912. The Liverpool Courier.
CENTRAL LEAGUE (Game 3)
Preston North End beat the Everton reserves team at Goodison Park yesterday, two goals to one being the score, but on the run of the play the Blues hardly deserved to lose. Still, they had themselves to blame for missing opportunities. For instance, they were awarded a penalty, but Gault, who took the kick, put the ball wide in trying to place past Taylor. Several other shots struck the upright with Taylor well beaten. Preston gained their two goals in the first half, when McKeller defeated Bromilow, who deputized for Hodge whilst Marshall gained the second with a really fine shot. It was not until the second half was well advanced that Everton were seen to advantage. Gault scored a fine goal, and later the forwards showed up well, but they could not gain an equaliser, although Taylor's charge had several narrow escapes . Everton: - Bromilow, goal, Holbem, and Simpson backs, McCulloch, Browell, and Grenyer, half-backs, Chedgzoy, Gault, Robinson, Murray, and Davidson, forwards.

EVERTON COMBINATION DEFEAT EGREMONT.
September 12, 1912. The Liverpool Courier.
Egrement and Everton Combination met at Mill-lane last night. Everton started strongly Walshe heading through from a nice centre by Lovelady. The scores were equalised by Henderson, and soon after Palmer scored Egremont's scored goal. Just before half-time Walshe levelled matters again, converting another pass by Lovelady, the score at half-time being two goals each. The second half opened in sensational style, Morris handling the ball in the penalty area, and Walshe had no difficulty in scoring his third goal from the kick. Smith placed the teams on level terms again, receiving on the half-way line, and going right through Delaney scored a fourth for Everton, and Walshe got his fourth goal just on time. Final Everton 5 goals, Egremonds 3.

NOTTS TEAM V EVERTON
September 12 1912. Liverpool Express.
The Notts County team to meet Everton has been chosen as follows –Iremonger; Morley and West; Emberton, Clamp, and Craythorne, Waterall, Flint, Cantrell, Jones, and Tomlinson. This is the same team as that which drew with West Bromwich.

Everton Reserves.
Everton Reserves were beaten by Preston Reserves yesterday, but the run of the play the “Blues” hardly deserved to be beaten. The team to oppose Rochdale on Saturday is: Bromilow; Simpson, and Holbem; McCulloch, Browell, and Grenyer; Chedgzoy, Gault, Gourlay, Robinson, and Davidson. Laurie reserve.

NOTTS AT GOODISON.
September 13, 1912. Evening Express Liverpool
Local enthusiasts are concerned, is the debut of Everton at home. The “Blues” have preformed well so far, and there is sure to be a big crowd to welcome them to Goodison. Notts County are the visitors, and while the County are not a “star” side, they are nevertheless a sturdy eleven whose defence is famous as being dour and determined.

Offside Tactics.
Everton will not have it all their own way, but at same time I expect our men to win. I know local enthusiasts are rather set against certain Notts defenders for their off-side tactics, they should remember that it is open to the opposition to checkmate their movements. Morley shows intelligence in his football, and if his opponents are not clever enough to foresee his intentions when he makes an advance that is not Morley's fault. However, I think the Everton forwards know well enough how to cope with the situation if the occasion should arise. Iremonger is still a resourceful keeper, whilst Alf West makes Morley a good partner. I hope to see a good game. The “Blues” team is unchanged, and although Fleetwood has been suffering from a knock on the knee, I understand he will be alright for tomorrow. The kick off is timed for 3-30, and the teams are as follows: - Everton; Caldwell; Stevenson and McConnachie; Harris, Fleetwood, and Makepeace; Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, and Uren. Notts County; Iremonger; Morley, and West; Emberton, Clamp, and Crayborne; Waterall, Flint, Cautrell, Jones, and Tomlinson.

EVERTON
(Draw 1-1 Last season)
September 14, 1912. Evening Express, Liverpool
Notts County Open Season at Goodison.
Great Day for Harris.
His First Goal For Five Years.
Rout of the Lacemen
By Cosmo.
The opening match at Everton was largely attended. The players were given a hearty reception when they trooped on the field. Notts County, who were the visitors, had not gathered much encouragement from their two opening home displays, only one point having accrued from them. The ground was in excellent condition, the whole playing area being smooth and as flat as a billiard table. Both teams turned out as selected and lined up as follows: - Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (Captain), backs, Harris, Fleetwood, and Makepeace, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, and Uren, forwards. Notts County: - Iremonger, goal, Morley, and West, backs, Emberton, Clamp, and Craythorne, half-backs, Waterall, Flint, Cantrell, Jones and Tomlinson, forwards. Referee W. Chadwick.

Dashing Start.
There would be fully 20,000 spectators at the start. The game opened at a rare pace and Everton were early prominent with dashing onslaughts. Right from the start Harris after checking Jones put Jefferis on the gallop. The ball was taken by neat passing well into the visitors' quarters. Browell was finally given possession, but his shot was stopped by Iremonger and a second or two later Iremonger kept out a short range shot from Bradshaw. Some exciting play took place at the other end, Caldwell twice having to fist away when hard pressed. The came one of those movements which the most unemotional. Jefferis got going and placed over to Beare, who rare speed proved the undoing of West.

An Early Success
Beare placed right in front of Browell, who scored a capital shot. All this had happened in the first four or five minutes –truly an exciting commencement. Then followed some strenuous midfield play in which the respective intermediate lines stood out with credit. Another pass out to the home right ended. In Beare finishing another clever dribble by placing in front of goal. Iremonger's tall form shot out and the ball was punched away. Browell next got in a likely shot, and Iremonger had to literally throw himself across the goal to keep it out. The Notts front line were showing nothing like the same effective combination as the Blues, but there were times when the spirited dashes of the outside men cause home defence some anxious moments.

Liberal Charges.
The Notts halves are a hasty lot, and they were very liberal in their charges. Morley twice miskicked, but in each case the mistake was covered by Emberton. Notts had a good opening when the referee allowed Cantroll to dash away from a clearly offside position. Makepeace give chase, but was not soon enough to prevent the Notts centre from shooting. The ball, however, went a yard wide of the target. In the next few minutes some dangerous play was witnessed in the home goal. Some uneasiness was caused by Caldwell twice allowing the greasy ball to slip from his hands. Fortunately, however, it did not end in disaster. The Notts men were playing with great vigour and determination, and by the this time were having a fair share of the play. The Everton forwards got going once more, and then followed an over memorable incident.

Harris's First Goal.
Val Harris during his five years useful service with Everton, has never had the satisfaction of scoring a goal. He has tried hard, but somehow up to this afternoon ill luck has attended all his efforts. Twenty minutes after the start he scored as brilliant goal as one could wish to see. He had wriggled his way right across to the left wing and then finding himself clear of the opposition he screwed in an oblique shot which entered the goal just under the bar. Iremonger being taken completely unawares. It was a great goal and at length the spell of ill-luck, it is to be hoped, has been broken. The spectators delight knew no bounds and the cheering and waving of hats continued for several minutes. Then followed a spell of attacking by the Notts men who repeated worked themselves into a dangerous position, but they rarely looked like scoring Caldwell had one hard shot to save Jones, but this was the only time he was troubled. Beare galloped away and centred with good judgement, but the finishing touch goalward was not forthcoming. Notts had now adopted their old familiar methods of playing one back well up the field thus causing the Blues to be frequently pulled up for infringement of the off-side rule. These methods nevertheless, profited then little Everton's superiority being beyond question. A well placed corner kick by Uren led to the ball being steered into goal. Iremenger making

A fine Save
The Everton forwards, and halves now began to give as much as they received in the matter of hard knocks, the game now being extremely vigorous.

Half-Time Everton 2 Notts County 0
Although Notts had done quite as much attacking during the first half as the Blues, they deserved to be arrears at the interval. Everton not only showed better combination, but much superior finish.

Second Half.
Everton opened the second half-spirited attack. Bradshaw delivered a fast shot, of which Iremonger safely disposed. A corner kick almost led to disaster for the homesters. MaConnachie, who had stationed himself at the far end of the goal, saving an almost certain goal with a back heel kick. The Everton forwards continued to find the one-back tactics of their opponents very disconcerting, but for all that the Notts goal was far from immune from attacks. Beare finished weakly after a clever dribble and later the Notts goal had a narrow escape, Jefferis striking the crossbar with a hot shot.

Visitors Troublesome.
A breakaway to the other end for Waterall outwitted MaConnachie. The visitors continued to make spirited dashes whenever an opportunity presented itself it generally found MaConnachie and Stevenson too hard a nut to crack. Beare and Jefferies were working well together, the latter having hard lines on one occasion stumbling when about to shoot.

Blues' Third Goal.
Everton's third goal was the result of some really tricky work by Uren. He tricked several –opponents then placed accurately in front of goal. Bradshaw rushing up and scoring with deadly precision. Notts continued to create openings only to lose them through lack of finish. On one occasion a beautiful centre was put in by Waterall, Cantrell starring the ball wide with a header. Notts gained a corner kick but it was not improved upon. Uren finished another neat sprint with a grand centre, the ball going right across the goal, and Beare smartly returning to the foot of Jefferis, who grazed the crossbar with a strong shot. West was giving a good account of himself for the visitors, his volleying being particularly noteworthy. The closing stages saw Notts Working

Might and Main .
To secure a goal, but try as they would they could not score. At the other end Iremonger had an anxious moment or two, having to save three shots in succession immediately afterwards Browell added.

A Fourth Goal.
For Everton, after tricky work by Beare. Just before the end Everton forwards delighted the crowd with their clever footwork and passing their concerted action at this period being really brilliant.
Final Result Everton 4, Notts County 0.

ROCHDALE RES V EVERTON RES
September 14, 1912. Liverpool Evening Express
Central league.
At Rochdale before 6,000 spectators. With the wind in their favour, Everton opened in fine style and Gourlay and Gault both had hard lines with shots from close quarters. Everton pressed very hard, and Gourlay shot against the foot of the posts. Tully got the ball just inside the post. Page added a third past Bromilow with a fine drive, which passed . Half-time Rochdale 3 Everton 0.

EVERTON 4 NOTTS COUNTY 0
September 16, 1912. The Liverpool Courier.
EVERTON'S CLEVER FORWARDS.
A REMARKABLE DEMONSTRATION.
The 25,000 spectators who witnessed the opening match at Goodison Park were provided with some really first class football. The exhibition given by Everton, was indeed worth going a long way to see, and the manner of the scoring of the goals will remain fresh in the memory for a long time to come. The game itself furnished a striking contrast in methods. Eleven determined hard working players represented Notts. They put in all they knew, and what advantage they possessed in the matter of weight and inches they made the most of. By sheer dash and vigour, and occasional flashes of individual brilliance, their forwards had almost as much of the attack as the homesters, but try as they would they could not score. The Everton backs took a lot of beating, but still there were several occasions when the defence should have been overcome. Time after time openings were created to be lost by bad marksmanship. How different it was with Everton. In all their attacks they left a sting. Their beautifully concerted movements were backed up by strong finishing power, and the result was that, while Iremonger got rid of more than half a dozen difficult shots, he was clean beaten on four occasions. For clear goals in a wide margin but it on no way over emphiasises the superiority of the homesters. They were immediately the better team at all points, their display being of general excellence.

VAL HARRIS SCORERS.
Everton did not wait long to show their real intentions. Four minutes after the start Jefferis made headway, and passed out to Beare, who, after working his way round West placed in front for Browell to score. The subsequent play saw Everton not unduly exerting themselves, while on the other hand, the Notts men frequently caused trouble to the home defence with their spirited dashes. The scoring of the homesters' second goal by Harris just before the interval was followed by a remarkable demonstration. For more than four years the player has been denied the satisfaction of scoring a goal for Everton, and he has been promised all sort of things if ever he should accomplish his ambition. His spell of ill luck was broken on Saturday, for he scored as brilliant a goal as one could wish to see. He had to work his way round several opponents, crossing from the right to the left, and then dashing in a fast rising shot with his left foot, which completely beat Iremonger. His colleagues quickly surrounded the popular Celt, and he received their congratulations with beaming countenatice. The spectators' delighted know no bounds, the lusty cheering and waving of hats being repeated again and again. The two goals scored in the second half were both the result of clever play. The home forwards indulged in some delightful footwork, and although Notts frequently resorted to the one back fame they found that those tactics availed them little against a set of forwards who worked together with clock-wise precision. Notts were completely out-played in the closing stages, and Jefferis got in a terrific drive, which deserved a better fate than to strike the bar. Everton's third goal was led up to by a neat sprint by Uren, his accurate centre giving Bradshaw his opportunity for steering into the net. Iremonger by this time was looking very glum, but he was beaten yet again. Beare after tricky work placing in front for Browell who scored with a deadly left foot drive.

BROWELL'S GREAT WORTH.
The one player on the home side to cause anxiety was Caldwell, for in the early part of the game when Notts were repeatedly aggressive he seemed more than a trifle shaky. The backs as usual were sound and skilful, and no fault could be found with the intermediate line. Harris was the pick of the three for quite apart from the goal he scored he was in great form. One cannot speak too highly of the forwards. They were all five exceedingly clever. Uren has found a blue jersey much to his liking, and he is at present showing tip-top form. Beare also gave a grand display while Jefferis was repeatedly applauded for the clever footwork. Browell delighted the crowd with his brilliant work near goal. He was cool and resourceful, and he timed the centres from the wings with uncering judgement. The one great weakness of the Notts forwards was lack of finish. Canythore at centre played with rare dash, and vigour, but he was sadly lacking in shooting powers. Waterall gave a good account of himself at outside right, but Flint was not seen at his best. Tomlinson and Jones were much less effective on the left. The half-backs worked hard, but were lacking in resource, while of the backs Morley was far from reliable, but West gave a grand display, his volleying being particularly noteworthy. Teams: - Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (Captain), backs, Harris, Fleetwood, and Makepeace, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, and Uren, forwards. Notts County: - Iremonger, goal, Morley, and West, backs, Emberton, Clamp, and Craythorne, half-backs, Waterall, Flint, Cantrell, Jones and Tomlinson, forwards. Referee W. Chadwick.

ROCHDALE 3 EVERTON RESERVES 0
September 16, 1912. The Liverpool Courier.
CENTRAL LEAGUE (Game 4)
Everton Reserves are not performing at all satisfactory, and they submitted to their second defeat in the course of four days at Rochdale, where they proved fairly easy winners for last season's champion of the combination. Rochdale obtained all their three goals in the first half through Page (2) and Tully, but try as they would the Blues could not penetrate the solid defence opposed to them . Everton: - Bromilow goal, Simpson, and Holbem, backs, McCulloch, A. Browell, and Grenyer half-backs, Chedgzoy, Gault, Gourlay, Robinson, and Davidson forward.

BRILLIANT BLUES.
September 16, 1912. Evening Express, Liverpool
By the Critic.
Val Harris's Goal.
Everton delighted their friends by the convincing way they brought about the overthrow of Notts County, and their four goals' victory was well deserved. Whilst the game was by no means one-sided, the visitors played an entirely different class of football to the homemen, and whilst Everton were artistic in every move, and finished with much power, Notts failed to finish in a manner calculated to bring points. Everton are to be congratulated on their magnificent play, and I am sure the spectators were delighted with the first home venture. And did not Harris score a goal? We have waited long for that point, but Val's goal was worth waiting for. It was a grand one when it did come. How the crowd did applaud! The roar must have been heard for miles around. Your hand, Val. It was a fine piece of work. Even if you have been playing for Everton since April 1908, without a point until Saturday your play has been of the highest quality, but that goal has satisfied an ambition which has long been cherished. May it be followed by others.

Kicking Back to the Keeper.
The “Blues” were much cleverer than their opponents and finished in a style which spelt goals; whereas the rushes of the Notts men were never really dangerous, simply because the forwards lack finish. The defence has always had a reputation for adopting novel methods, but surely there was no need for Morley and others to place the ball back to the goalkeeper when they were near the half way line? Yet these tactics were adopted on several occasions. Had the players been hard pressed at the time one could understand it, but I failed to see the necessity of the course, but you “never can tell,” when Notts are in the field. Morley showed cleverness at times in throwing his opponents offside, but on the whole these tactics were not so prominent as formerly.

Clever Forward Play
The Everton forwards were particularly smart and I should imagine that the “Blues” are in for a really good season. At the outset Beare and company gave us a taste as to what to expect, and the early impression proved to be correct, for whilst Notts played strong football, they were never clever enough, and Everton always seemed to have something in hand. Beare showed marked ability and speed against West at times, and his centre which enabled Browell to score the first was a beauty. Frank Jefferis was not so prominent as usual, but he had hard line with one shot, which hit the bar. Tom Browell, is a sure as ever in his shooting, whilst his passing out to the wings were really delightful. Browell wastes no times in trapping the ball, and his judgement and steady nerve makes him an ideal centre forward. The great point about Browell's play is his ability to shoot at the right moment from any position without unnecessary manceurving. He takes the ball before it drops with remarkable accuracy, and seldom do any of his wing passes go astray. Those who saw him for the first time on Saturday marvelled at the ability the youth possesses. “First time” is Browell's motto, and we know it pays. He has scored three goals to date. Coming to Bradshaw, I must say he played a very useful game, his combination with Uren being fine. His goal was another point in favour of first time shots. He caught the ball before it reached the ground, and the leather fairly flashed past Iremonger. Uren's work, which played the way for this goal, was really smart, and altogether the wingers are a very encouraging display. His centres were fine.

Caldwell's Mistakes.
The halves as usual were strong and resourceful, with Harris and Makepeace being the best although Fleetwood was a rare defender. Further behind MaConnachie and Stevenson were very safe, the captain being especially neat in his work. Caldwell however, was not convincing. His mistakes might easily have proved disastrous against more trustful forwards. The ball was wet, but that was not sufficient excuse for the keeper's lack of control. On the Notts side Iremonger did well in goal, and Alf West was a really fine back. I was delighted to see the old Liverpool man in such fine form.

EVERTON v. NOTTS COUNTY.
Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer - Monday 16 September 1912
Miserable damp weather prevailed at Goodison Park, Liverpool, for this match. Twenty thousand spectators witnessed the start, and in three minutes Everton were one up, Browell scoring finely from Beare's centre. Iremonder was further troubled, but the game afterwards opened out, and Notts had good share of the play. Harris scored the second goal, this being the Irishman's first goal for Everton. Interval— Everton two goals, Notts County none. Harris received rare ovation when scored, and resuming Bradshaw fired in hard shot, which Iremonger saved. The game again was fast and interesting. Jefferis hit the post, and Iremonger saved cleverly from the rebound. Notts' goal escaped narrowly, but later the visitors improved , without being dangerous. Then Everton obtained a goal. Uren's tricky work enabling Bradshaw score. Near the finish Browell added the fourth for Result: Everton 4 goals, Notts County none.

FAMOUS SCOTTISH PLAYER' JOINS DUBLIN CLUB.
Dundee Courier - Wednesday 18 September 1912
Willie McLaughlin, who for several seasons was the mainstay in the defence of Hamilton Academicals has signed for the Shelborne Club, Dublin. During the last two seasons he captained the Hamilton eleven, and among his many fine performances was the scoring of the winning goal that ousted Dundee from the Scottish ties in 1910-11. McLaughlin migrated from Cambuslang Hibernians to Hamilton Academicals, and after a time he went South, playing in turn for Everton, Plymouth Argyle, and Preston North End. From the latter club he returned to Hamilton Academicals, with whom he proved to be the most consistent player the club has ever had. Originally a forward, he proved his versatility by filling the breach at centre-half.

EVERTON DIRECTORS
Dundee Courier - Wednesday 18 September 1912
The Everton Directors have come to a sensible arrangement in the matter of benefits to their players. When they have once decided to award one they will hand over to the favoured individual £500. Every footballer, therefore, who plays for the club and is allotted benefit will know the exact amount he will receive.

DERBY COUNTY v. EVERTON.
Nottingham Evening Post - Wednesday 18 September 1912
TWO PENALTIES AGAINST THE “RAMS.”
Last time Everton appeared at the Baseball Ground the Rams achieved a brilliant victory in the Cup competition, and this evening the teams renewed acquaintance in the League, and a crowd of some 14,000 people welcomed them. The weather was perfect, and everything pointed to a hard and interesting struggle. Compared with the side that beat Sunderland, the County made one change, Garry taking the place of Richards, who was injured, whilst Gault was substituted for Jefferis in the visiting eleven. The game opened briskly, Everton advancing on the left, and Uren lifted the ball into Scattergood's arms, the keeper clearing effectively. The “Rams” were not long in retaliating, a beautiful passing movement on the right being crowned by a perfect centre from Grimes, which, Maconnachie returned, and when Grimes indulged in another sparkling bit of footwork a corner resulted, which the Scot fisted away over the heads of a crowd of players. Beare tricked Betts, and centred prettily, but Atkin cleared. Beare. however, speedily raced back, and Atkin conceded a corner, from which Browell headed in, Scattergood bringing off a remarkably fine save. Leonard and Barnes were prominent in a sturdy attempt directly afterwards, but hampered by Macconnachie the first named failed to get any power behind his shot and Caldwell easily saved whilst directly afterwards Stevenson relieved in dashing style.
A SPRINT BY SHAPE
Sharpe sprinted back and complelled Stevenson to give a corner and with the flag kick being cleared Everton swept down in line, Betts robbing Beare very neatly. From a free kick against Buckley, Fleetwood misdirected, but Uren got the better of a tussle with Aitken a moment later, and put in a capital centre, Browell being penalised for handling when the home goal was in serious jeopardy. The "Rams" set up another vigorous atatck, but Stevenson intercepted a dangerous centre from Grimes, and Everton once more assailed in close order, Browell missed the target by a foot. Gault grazed the crossbar with a brilliant shot, and then the "Rams" made a spirited incurison on the left, and gained a corner, from which Caldwell fisted away. The County, however, remained on the offensive, and twenty-eight minutes had elapsed when they were rewarded, leonard accepting a neat pass from Barnes, and giving Caldwell no chance with a hard, low drive. Within a minute the visitors had equalised, Betts being adjudged to have handled a centre from Uren, and a penalty being promptly awarded, Macconnachie who was rentrusted with the kick, easily beat Scattergood. The home forwards made desperate efforts to re-establish the lead, and passed attreactively, but Caldwell beat away a header from Barnes and then Beare burst away at top speed, and tricking Garry drove the ball into the centre. It caught Betts arm in transit, and Mr. Garner awarded the visitors another penalty at the expiration of 34 minutes. Macconnachie again took the kick, but this time Scattergood saved, only for the Everton full back to secure possession from the rebound and drive it into the net. The subsequent play was all in favour of the vsiitors, whose forwards combined splendidly, and Bradshaw and Browell rushed another centre from Beare past Scattergood, only for the point to be disallowed on the ground, apparently of hands. Everton maintained a determined atatck and Scattergood saved cleverl;y from Bardshaw, whilst just before the interval Aitken stemmed a dangerous rush on the left. half-time; Everton 2, Derby 1. Players;- Derby County; Scattergood; Atkins, Betts; Barbour, Buckley, Garry; Grimes, Bloomer, Leonard, Barnes, and L.G. Sharpe. Everton; Caldwell; Stevenson, MaCoonacchie; Harris, Fleetwood, Makepeace; Beare, Gault, Browell, Bradshaw, and Uren. Referee; Mr. T., Garner, Barnsley.
Within two minutes of the resumption Everton increased their lead, due to the slackness of the home defence, Uren dropping a centre from Beare and, having ample time to take aim,scored with a shot which cut the inside of the post and glanced into the net. The Rams ,undauted, attacked strenously, and Fleetwood bundled when Leonard tried to dash through, the referee awarding a free kick a foot outside the penalty line, and waying his hand to a strong appeal for a penalty. Everton again atatcked rigourouly, but were beaten back. Five minutes from the end Beare ran through and scored a fourth for Everton, whilsat two minutes later a penalty was given against Macconnachie, Bloomer's shot striking the under side of the crossbar and glancing down in front of Caldwell, who cleared, injuring himself in the effort. Result; Everton 4, Derby County 1

TOWN AND GOSSIP.
Derby Daily Telegraph - Thursday 19 September 1912
Of all the matches played between Derby County and Everton, the nearest parallel to the disaster of Wednesday evening was the Cup-tie of 1890 on the old ground at Anfield road, when Everton won by 11 goals to 2. On paper it was" great victory for the Everton players, but it was not a victory of which the details would bear close scrutiny. The Derby goalkeeper, Enos Bromage, lost his nerve badly at the outset of the game, and give away some of the simplest goals ever seen in first-class football. The Derby forwards acquitted themselves like heroes, and the rest of the team worked their hearts out, but there stood poor Bromage in goal a helpless bundle of nerves, giving away goals faster than his own side could score them. It was one of the-tragic days of football history, and even the Everton supporters—then only half instructed in the niceties of the Association code—could see for themselves that the sentiment most appropriate to the occasion was weep for the vanquished rather than to indulge in unseemly exultation over their prostrate forms. It is a good many years since that dreadful spectacle, on a dreadful afternoon, a dreadful ground was witnessed, but the memory of will not readily depart from those who had the misfortune to witness the rout of the Derby team, and who would probably have been glad to follow the example of Mr. F. R. Spofforth, who fled from the scene long before the close, declaring that he could stand it no longer. But on Wednesday, the whole scene was vividly brought back to our minds—and doubtless to the minds of others—until we could picture it all as though it were being re-enacted before our eyes. For to no inconsiderable extent' history had repeated itself, and Everton had defeated Derby County by four goals to one—a defeat which, we make bold to assert, the losers as a whole had done nothing to deserve. tip to a certain point we could not have desired see better match or one more instinct with the higher genius of football. There was much delightful passing by the forwards, there was a great deal of clever tackling by the half-backs, and Farmer Buckley, as is his wont, had tickled the ears of the groundlings," as Hamlet would have put it, by incontinently felling any casual opponent who had had the temerity to obstruct him in the execution of his duty. But that, of course, is a way he has, and after a time the Everton men began to realise that this happy-looking countryman was a person to be approached with respect and caution. If one could have pointed out any disparity in the teams in the course of that glorious first half-hour, it would be at the expense of Derby County, whose efforts at the critical point were lacking in the finish that characterised those of Everton. There was one attack by Everton in which Gault, who was acting substitute for the great Jefferis, headed the ball into the Derby goal, where Scattergood effected one of his best saves. The Riddings man well deserved the eheer which the clearance evoked. Then came the beautiful goal which so worthily crowned the half-hour's excellent work. It originated with Bloomer, who gave Leonard one of his old-time quick passes, which the Derby centre intercepted with equal promptitude. There may differences of opinion as to Leonard's merits as a centre-forward, but there could be none as to the alertness with which he seized on this very eligible opening. In second he was facing goal with the ball at h feet. He heeded not a couple opponents that bore down on him. one of whom reached him in a vain attempt to rob him of the ball. Outr shot the right foot, and though Caldwell had gone up to that end of the goal was well beaten between his left hand and the goal post. It was a really good goal, well worked for, and cleverly consummated—the pass itself worthy of the master, and the shot one that would not have disgraced Sandy Higgins in his halcyon days. We have it on the greatest of all human authorities that " there is a tide in the affairs man which taken at the flood leads on to fortune; omitted, all the voyage of their lives is bound in shallows and in miseries." When Leonard kicked the ball past Caldwell, the fortunes of Derby County were at tha food. A steady, strong pull would have landed them into smooth water,/where they could have defied the brilliant assaults with which the Everton players bore down their defence. It was a situation that demanded cool heals, and the dogged self-reliance which often enables a less expert performer to wear down sheer impetuosity, no matter how brilliant. But in the very moment of their apparent triumph Derby County faltered at the supreme test of greatness, and the fabric of victory they had so laboriously reared was soon tottering about their ears. When the game was resumed it was Everton who threw into their play that infectious and'irrepressible vim that is the outcome of the spirit of Conquer or Die. They bore down on the Derby defence force, there was a momentary confusion in the Derby ranks,. and then Betts undoubtedly touched the ball with his hand, but whether by accident or design is a problem we must be excused from attempting to solve. All care to commit ourselves to is the opinion that such an offence is frequently committed without calling for the infliction of the most extreme penalty known to football law. Here, however, its influence on the game was swift and decisive. From the penalty kick Macconachie obtained a goal, which was bad enough in ill conscience, but, after all, as nothing compared to the supreme agony endured a few moments later. For, in lees time "than it takes to write the story, the same thing had happened again with the same disastrous accompaniments. Scattergood this time stopped the ball, but it went back direct to the feet of Macconnachie, whoi could hardly have missed the second time, even had he been minded to do so. No doubt there are plenty of our readers who are passionately fond of the sea, but are not very good sailors. They have probably gone out many times in sporting sea and have tasted to the full the pleasures of "a life on the ocean wave " —for a time. Then all at once the soene is changed. Our exhilaration and enjoyment are over, our shouts of delight cease, we ask for the boat to be turned round, and we are taken ashore sadly chastened and subdued. One cannot say that all interest in the game of Wednesday evening experienced as sudden an extinction as this, but it needed no profound instinct to make one realise that the two penalties against Betts had dealt it a deadly blow, from which it could hardly hope to recover. The situation that had been created was far worse for Derby County than the mere fact of being "in a minority of one goal to two, for the blow was moral as well material. In vain did the resourceful Bloomer and big-hearted Buckley endeavour to rally their forces; the effort was futile as the attempt of Napoleon to rally the Old Guard after the fateful words,' qui peut," had been tremulously passed from lip to lip on the field, of Waterloo. For all practical purposes, the as well" have the second penalty, for no one believed that it was in the power of Derby County or any other team to wrestle with any hope of success against such stupendous ill-luck as had befallen poor Betts, and through him the whole side. He had played the part that years before had been played by Enos Bromage, and he went about for the rest of the afternoon with the conscious air Cf being the Jdnah of the team. Frankly, felt sorry for him, and our sympathy was deepened the varying views held as to his indiscretions. No two people appeared to think quite alike on the subject. One body of opinion declared that the first might have called for a penalty kick, but that the second decision was ridiculous. Others, on the other hand., thought that the second decision might possibly be justified, but that the first was absurd, so that between the two the referee probably had serene conscience. Though in the records of the game it will down to history that September 18, 1912, Everton defeated Derby County by four goals to one, we venture to interpose a doubt to the strict accuracy of the verdict, and to suggest that the whole course of the game was influenced by a chapter of accidents that enabled Everton to reap wholly extravagant and disproportionate reward. Future opponents of Derby County must not count too confidently on crumpling up the Derby defence after the manner of Everton on Wednesday evening. The match may best be described as " Penalty kick gone mad." Not, of course, that make any complaint against the referee, who was perfectly justified according to the rules in giving all three penalties, and only escaped being compelled to give a fourth on a mere question of geography. Certainly there was a sufficient element of intention regard to the "Hands" that brought the offences within the four corners of the law, even though one is bound to admit that the goal was in no immediate danger, and that the interests of neither side were either advanced or prejudiced by what Betts, or Macconnachie did. Everyone knows that under the criminal law of England a distinction is drawn between murder and manslaughter. For murder a man pays but one penalty, whereas the offence of manslaughter is punishable according to the degree of criminality which the Court believes attaches to the prisoner on the evidence before the Court. But football no such distinction drawn in the matter of the penalty kick. the full back deliberately fists out a shot that is passing underneath the bar, the punishment is precisely the same—no more and no less—as when a player touches the ball yards away from goal with the unreflecting anl uncontrollable impulse that proved too much for Betts. that quite fair ? It may be urged in reply that what is good for one is good for another, and that even justice is in the end meted out to all. But that does not alter our conviction—and the conviction of a great many others—that in this particular match the punishment so far from fitting the crime, was excessive to the last degree. Everton are. a magnificent team— we would be the last to question such very self-evident fact. But we confess would have preferred to see their victory over Derby County obtained by the aid of their own transcendent merits, and on those merits alone.

DERBY COUNTY 1 EVERTON 4
September 19, 191. The Liverpool Courier.
EVERTON'S GREAT VICTORY.
DERBY OUTCLASSED.
THREE PENALTY KICKS.
The Everton team accomplished a fine performance yesterday at Derby, when they gained a well-earned victory by 4 goals to 1. The Evertonians were in splendid trim, and the Derby team were made to look very ordinary in the second half, when the Blues had the game to themselves. It was an extre ordinary game if it was only for the fact that no fewer than three penalty kicks were awarded and what is more, one man was concerned in all three. Macconnachie the Everton captain was deputed to take the two kicks for Everton, and he scored both occasions. Macconnachie, however, was adjudged to have handled in the penalty area when Derby were pressing, but the referee apparently made a mistake for the ball came full on the player's chest. The referee decided otherwise. Bloomer took the kick, only to see his shot strike the bar, and Caldwell was enabled to clear from the rebound. Bloomer brought the keeper down badly as he was in the act of clearing, and a free kick to Everton cleared the danger. These were exciting incidents, but otherwise it was not a great game from an unbiased spectator's point of view, for the simple reason that for the major portion of the contest there was only one team in it, and that was not Derby. True, they made some spasmicals bursts but there was little merred and concerned movements were few and far between. In the first half Derby played fairly well, but in the second portion they could never extend Everton, who at the end simply toyed with their opponents. Everton played splendid football, and apart from their penalty kicks, fully deserved their success. They were the better balanced team at all points, and the Derby half-backs, although they unparted much vigour into their work, could never thoroughly cope with the crisp footwork of the Blues forwards.

SPARKLING FORWARDS.
The Everton front line played sparkling football. Bradshaw and Uren as a wing being particularly good, whilst Beare was in splendid trim on the extreme right. Gault made him a good partner. The Tyneside youth was making his first appearance in league football. Frank Jefferis having been injured on Saturday. The young player made a very good impression as Beare partner his passing being very neat and well directed whilst his sent it two or three fine shots, one effort being luckily saved by Scattergood, whilst another shaved the bar. At the same time, he would have done better at times to put into the centre rather than try shots himself from too difficult angles. Still, his debut in League football must be voted a success. Browell was not so prominent as usual, but he kept his wings together. The halves were spoilers, and the Derby attacks were broken up with the judgement. Fleetwood was in his usual robust mood whilst Harris and Makepeaace played cleverly. Macconnachie and Stevenson never allowed the Derby forwards any rope, and Caldwell in consequence, had little to do. As a team, Everton were far and away the superior combination, and there were times when the County were made to look like novices. Bloomer was the only man whose deft touches troubled the opposition, and there is no doubt that the veteran remains much of his old skill in manipulating the ball and gliding the leather to his partner. Barlour was perhaps the best of the Derby halves, but Buckley played a strong game. The backs were none too safe, but Scattergood was an excellent custodian and he made some good saves. As a team, however, Derby for the most part were outclassed.

RUN OF THE PLAY.
The game opened in spirited fashion, with both sides attacking in turn, but Everton were always the more convincing in their footwork. Beare's centres were always dangerous and once Browell was unfortunate in handling when he had a good opening. Scattergood once saved splendidly from Gault, who headed sharply, whilst at the other end the Everton defence was pressed for a few moments, but Caldwell eventually cleared. Another attempt by Gault was ably saved by Scattergood, and then Bloomer was prominent with a couple of really delightful forward passes, but Leonard did not take advantage of them. Neat work at the other end saw Gault skim the bar and up to this point Everton did splendidly, and were unfortunate in not scoring. But then came a surprise, Leonard dashed through and beat Caldwell with a low shot, the keeper starting much too slowly to save the shot. A claim was made for offside, but this was not entertained. A couple of minutes later Betts handled in the penalty area, and Macconnachie who has never failed from one of these penalty kicks, beat Scattergood all to easily. More excitement followed, for after a rush to the other end Betts again handled a centre from Beare in the penalty area, and this time, Macconachie penalty kick shot against Scattergood, but the Everton captain coolly netted as the ball came out to him from the goalkeeper foot. Browell only just missed a centre by Beare, or the Blues might have been further ahead at the interval.

THIRD PENALTY KICK.
On restarting Everton took up the running, and only a few minutes had elapsed when a combined move in which Harris, Beare, and Browell took part, resulted in Uren scoring the third goal with a hard close shot into the far corner of the net. During the remaining portion of the game Derby made little headway. Everton holding them in check, and but for rather too much close passing near goal the visitors must have increased their lead. Derby only broke away on occasions, and once Fleetwood was adjudged to have handled the ball, He was standing inside the area, but the referee gave an ordinary free kick, and this was placed over the bar. The third penalty kick of the match came near the end, Macconnachie appeared to breast the ball, but the verdict was that he handled, and Bloomer taking the kick struck the under part of the crossbar. Caldwell caught the rebound and cleared. At the same moment Bloomer dashed into him, and the goalkeeper took some time to recover. In the closing minutes Beare put on the fourth goal, and the rout of the county was complete. On the form displayed Everton have a very strong side, and they play was greatly admired. It may be unquestioned that 400 enthusiasts made the journey from Liverpool, and there where 12,000 spectators present at the match.

Teams: - Derby County: - Scattergood, goal, Atkins, and Betts, backs, Parlour, Buckley, and Garry, half-backs, Grimes, Bloomer, Leonard, Barnes, and J.G. Sharp, forwards. Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson, and Macconnachie (Captain), backs, Harris, Fleetwood, and Makepeace, half-backs, Beare, Gault, Browell, Bradshaw, and Ureh, forwards. Referee Mr. Garner.

A TALE OF PENALTIES.
September 19, 1912. Evening Express, Liverpool.
Everton's Latest Success.
By the Critic.
Everton apparently have found their feet and already one hears talk of the championship. It is rather early in the day to even dream of such an event, but at the same time there is every reason to be satisfied with the “Blues” performances so far. Steven out of a possible eight points is decidedly encouraging, and their supporters are highly delighted with the success achieved. At the present time Everton are at the top of the League, their record being superior to that of the Rovers or Aston Villa who also claim seven points. This is decidedly good business, and from what I have seen of the side I think they will hold their own with the strongest opposition that can be put up against them. The “Blues” have scored 10 goals, and the point registered by leanard last evening was the first that has been chalked up against them. If they continue on the same lines the Toffee boys must claim a high position. Derby people were highly impressed by the form of the Goodison men yesterday, and the prevailing opinion in the Peak capital was that Everton played far superior football to the Rovers.

Blues Too Good for Derby.
Certain is that the “Blues” were far too good for the County eleven yesterday, and indeed so completely were the “Rams” overplayed after the first half hour that the score might easily have been more pronounced. No doubt the penalties knocked some of the heart out of Derby; but the same time, they could not be compared with Everton in point of class and finish footwork, the Merseysiders fully deserving their victory. It is not often one sees three penalties in a game, all given for handling; indeed I am inclined to think that it has never happened before. It was truly a tale of penalties and the total was very nearly being made into four. Fleetwood was adjudged to have handled the ball. At the time he was within the penalty area, and it was either a penalty or nothing –at least that is how it appeared to me –but the referee gave an ordinary free kick outside the area. MaConnachie figured prominently in this penalty business, and I should imagine he looks upon the taking of these kicks as one of his special lines. It will be remembered he scored against Tottenham from a penalty and yesterday he converted two, the second one being plotted into the net after Scattergood had saved. Mac has thus scored three goals so far this season. It was fitting that Bloomer did not score from Derby's penalty, in as much as the decision appeared to be an unfair one, as the Everton captain caught the ball on his breast. He certainly did not appear to handle, and the incident occurred in the open, where everyone could see. The captain afterwards told me that the ball struck him on the breast. However, it matter not now. In the case of the penalty awards against derby there was no question about it, for Betts very foolishly reached up to the ball on each occasion when there was really no necessity. The first fault was from a centre by Uren, and the other from Beare's cross. Against the Rovers Betts also handled and gave a penalty so, that he has proved rather expenses.

Prominent Players.
Everton played good football, but the opposition did not bring out their real qualities. In the first half hour Derby certainly played up with determination, but they were not as dangerous when near goal, as their opponents, and after the first penalty there was really only one team in it, for in the second half the “Blues” toyed with them, and might have scored more goals but for a tendency to overdo the passing near goal. Certainly the forwards ought to have obtained more than two points. But one must not grumble at a 4-1 victory. On the Everton side Caldwell had very little to do, but he showed obvious signs of nervousness, has antics in goal being somewhat amusing, Caldwell wants to steady the nervous temperament. MaConnachie and Stevenson were in splendid form at back, whilst the halves were really brilliant. They dominated the game, and never allowed the home forwards to settle down. They quickly stopped combined movements and in addition fed their forwards splendidly. It is a fine line. Fleetwood as usual worked like a Trojan and Harris and Makepeace were neat and clever in every move. The forwards did well, if not as brilliant as I have seen them. Browell again kept his wings together, but he missed the artistic touches of Frank Jefferis. Bradshaw and Uren are coming on as a wing. The outside man wasted little time, and his centres were always laden with danger. Bradshaw served him well, and the pair will yet make a great wing. Beare was perhaps the best of the line, his runs and centres being very fine, and the little winger generally had the opposing defence on toast.

Gault's Debut .
Gault's debut in League football must be voted a success. For some time, the rise of this player has been watched with interest, and yesterday he fully merited the confidence reposed in him. He combined cleverly with Beare, especially in the first half, and he had hard luck in no scoring with a smart header and again when he shaved the bar. No doubt he was anxious to score; but there was two occasions when he would have served his side better had he passed inside to Browell instead of shooting from a difficult angle. Nevertheless, Gault showed much promise. I was sorry to see that he caught a rather bad cold. In every department Everton were the superior side. Scattergood made some very fine clearances, but the backs were none too safe. Barbour played well, as also did Buckley, but Garry was a failure. Bloomer is still very clever and a number of his left touches reminded one of his palmist days. The famous inside right was undoubtedly the best forward on his side, and it was a pity that he should have though fit to foul Caldwell after he had failed to score from a penalty. It was sad to see such an experienced player as Bloomer lose his head as he did, for he charged Caldwell very heavily and unfairly.

WALTER SCOTT AND THE SUNDERLAND CLUB.
Derby Daily Telegraph - Friday 20 September 1912
Walter Scott, the goalkeeper of the Sunderland club, has been suspended by the directors of that organisation for absenting himself from training. He has also received 14 days' notice to terminate his agreement with the club. Scott went to Sunderland about 18 months ago from Everton. A native of Worksop, he first came into prominence when associated with Grimsby Town.

ANDY BURTON
Nottingham Evening Post - Friday 20 September 1912
Arrangements have been completed for the transfer of Andy Burton from Everton to Reading. Burton, who is an inside forward, was with Bristol City before going to Everton. As showing the interest taken in Bristol City by their followers, over £6OO has been taken in the two home matches, last Saturday’s receipts exceeding those for any home match last season.

EVERTON.
(“Blues Beaten 2-1 last season)
September 21, 1912. Evening Express, Liverpool
“Blues” At Old Trafford.
First defeat.
Manchester United win by Two Goals.
By Rover.
Everton's prospect of rubbing off some of the arrears that had accumulated in their engagements with Manchester United have seldom looked so promising. The Weather today was all that could be desired; indeed it was more in keeping with cricket, and it was small wonder that the “gate” was much above the average. As was feared Jefferis had not sufficiently recovered to take his place in the team, but fortunately Gault was fit, so that the Evertonians had nothing much to complain about us regarded representation. On the United side, there were several changes from the team that took part in the earlier games. Duckworth, who was pronounced fir, again filled the right back position, whilst Nuttall was entrusted with the inside right berth. The sides met with a great reception when they lined up as follows: - Manchester United: - Beale, goal, Duckworth, and Stacey, backs, Whalley, Roberts (Captain), and Bell, half-backs, Meredith, Nuttall, West, Turnbull, and Wall, forwards. Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson and Macconnachie (Captain), backs, Harris,

Fleetwood, and Makepeace, half-backs, Beare, Gault, Browell, Bradshaw, and Uren, forwards. Referee R. Eccles.
Fine Forward Work
There would be quite 20,000 spectators present when Browell opened the play and at once the Everton forwards swept all before them, and were within a few yards of Beale and looked like opening their account when Duckworth nipped in and cleared. Then Roberts sent his men on a promising mission, and first MaCconnachie and then Makepeace came through successfully to clear it somewhat deadly attack. Meredith returned, but his centre was not well supported but on a further advance Caldwell was called upon to save a shot from wall. Play was keen enough and rendering interesting by the speedy flashes of the respective wing men, but as a rule the defences on both sides were never found wanting, and the custodians were not called upon. However, the limitable Meredith once again set out on a dangerous attack, and after getting the better of MaConnachie put in a clever shot, which fortunately for Everton went over the bar.

The Opening Goal
Following this the United forwards advanced again, this time on the left, and Turnbull after deftly evading Harris put to Wall, who rounded Stevenson and put in a centre to the far post, where West was in readiness to head into the net. Caldwell was sourcely correct in position to deal with the wingers effort, and the United were thus somewhat lucky in securing this early success. Play had been in progress ten minutes when the point was recorded. Following further pressure by the United, the Everton forwards went away in fine style, and Browell was unfortunate with a shot that flashed against the upright and passed behind. Then Bradshaw was presented with an opening but was evidently over anxious, and drove the ball high over the bar. The game continued to be highly strung and the speedy end to end play kept the spectators on excellent terms with themselves. Turnbull was an artist in evading Harris and he swung the ball over to Wall, who brought out the full effort of Stevenson. However, the full backs did well, and their occasional cross shots were ably seceded by MaConnachie.

Meredith Well Watched.
Makepeace kept Meredith fairly well subdued, and from one of his touches Bradshaw made off with the result that Uren tested Beale with a shot that unfortunately lacked power. Returning again Meredith sent in an excellent centre, which Caldwell failed to accurately anticipate, but luckily Stevenson was on the spot to clear just as Turnbull was closing in to apply the finishing touch. This escape was signalized by a sturdy attack on the United defender, and although Gault failed to take advantage of a possible opening, the ball went to Beare, who was unmarked, but he made a very feeble attempt to score. The footwork of the Everton forwards was just now very effective, but they were up against a sturdy defence, and on every occasion they were hampered in their final efforts.

Strong Defence.
Fine work by Bradshaw augured well, but Browell was adjusted offside, while a moment later Duckworth was lucky in keeping out Uren, who had worked into a capital position for scoring. It was a neck or nothing effort on the part of the United back, but it came off and the home situation was saved. For some time the Evertonians controlled most of the movements of the play, and only sheer grit and determination on the part of the home defenders kept them out. A few minutes before the interval the home forwards went off at a good pace, and West looked like putting on a successful finishing touch when Stevenson managed to get to the ball as it was being applied. Next Nuttall tried his luck, but without success, and on a further return Caldwell dumbled a slow shot from Turnbull but fortunately recovered himself in time to evade disaster.

Half-Time Manchester United 1 Everton 0
The first half was brimful of exciting movements, but at close quarters neither side showed exceptional ability. Particularly was this so in the case of Everton, who with the chances that came their way, should certainly not have been behind at the interval. Still, on the general run of play the United were slightly the more aggressive, and they might have increased their lead. The home defence was well served by Duckworth, who played a masterly game against Bradshaw and Uren, but as a rule the whole of the first position might be said to have been a trial of strength in respective half-back lines.

Fleetwood To The Rescue.
The game was resumed some 30,000 spectators, and in a trice the Everton goal was assailed by the home right, Caldwell coming out to West, and as the ball was hovering on the line ands looked like being piloted through, Fleetwood came to the rescue. Play became keener than ever and good efforts was made by Beare and then Uren, but to no avail, though a movement by Bradshaw, who had played himself into a good position at the expense of Roberts ended in the ball being driven over the bar with a fast shot. Just now Everton were giving a glimpse of their best form, and for sometime they set the pace and extended the United defenders to the utmost, but out a quite a number of onslaughts Makepeace was nearest the mark with a fine drive, which brought Beale to his knees.

West Scores Again.
Close on time West Breasted the ball through from a centre from Wall, of United. Final Result; Manchester United 2, Everton 0.

EVERTON RES V. MANCHESTER UNITED RES.
September 21, 1912. Evening Express Liverpool
At Goodison Park. Teams: - Everton: - Hodge, goal; Holbem and Laurie, backs; Simpson, Browell (a) (captain) and Grenyer, half-backs; Chedgzoy, Smith, Murray, Graham and Davidson, forwards. Manchester United Res: - Mew, goal; Roberts and Donnelly, backs; Livingstone, Knowles, and Hodge, halfbacks; Sheldon, Woodcock, Anderson, Hooper, and Blott, forwards. Referee: Mr. W. Pearson. Ideal weather prevailed when Anderson set the ball in motion. The opening exchanges were contracted in midfield, but eventually Everton forged ahead, and a miskick by Knowles look ominous for the United, but Donnolly saved the situation. Everton maintained the pressure, and Chedgzoy got across a dangerous centre which Roberts in trying to clear turned the ball into his own net. This goal came after five minutes play. The ball had hardly been set into motion again when

Hooper Executed
A fine individual effort, which culminated in Woodstock scoring for the United. Clever forward play by the home forwards carried play into the visitors quarters, and Davidson narrowly missed with two lighting drives. The Everton vanguard was playing at their best, and the Manchester goal had miraculous escapes from several accurately placed centres. Smith then made a gallant effort to score, but his shot was well saved by Mew. The Blues again attacked and forced a corner from which

Graham Scored.
At the other end Woodstock tried his best to put his side on level terms again, but Hodge brought off a magnificent save which was loudly applauded. The Blues were soon attacking again, and from a lighting drive by Davidson Mew made a wonderful one-handed save. Murray had a fine chance of putting Everton further ahead, but he shot too soon and Mew had no difficulty in saving his shot. Nearing the interval Manchester forced a corner, from which Livingstone shot in, but Holbem got his head to the ball and prevented it from entering the net. Two more corners fell to the lot of Manchester, but nothing-tangible result. Half-time, Everton 2, Manchester United 1.

MANCHESTER UNITED 2 EVERTON 0
September 23, 1912. The Liverpool Courier.
EVERTON'S SET-BACK
MANCHESTER UNITED'S POWERFUL DEFENCE.
There is probably no better drawing team in the county just now than the Goodison Park brigade, and this was evidenced at Old Trafford in no unmistakable fashion on Saturday. Close upon forty thousand spectators assembled, and there witnessed, if not a brilliant exposition of the code, at any rate a hard and determined struggle from start to finish. It was unfortunate for Everton that they had to meet such dour opponents as the United after a strenuous tussle with Derby County during the week. The result was pateat to the close observer, and the “Blues” were beaten not by a clever, but by a fresher team. The United almost for man for man were quicker on the ball, the result of course, of not having had an extended test during the week, and although they prevailed by two goals to nil, the margin of superiority was somewhat flattering. The breaking up tactics of the halves and the incisive advances of the United forwards were always poignant features of the game, will the manner in which the goals were obtained was not at all convincing, sad a trustful lung by the Everton keeper would at any rate have prevented the first point being recorded. There are times when a keeper must risk a bit even at the expense of finding himself on the top of one of his defenders, and such it was on Saturday that had there been keen anticipation shown the game might have been of the goalless order.

HARASSING HALVES.
The success of the United was in the main due to grit and persistency of the half backs, who on Saturday would have succeeded in breaking up any organised plan of campaign. Roberts would simply not be beaten, and those on either side of him were equaily determined in their efforts to prevent the Everton forwards from getting into their dangerous stride. As a result Browell was only very occasionally in the picture, and though he succeeded at times in putting the ball out to his wings, he was always kept under observation by the watchful Roberts, with the result that not a shot of any promise was allowed to trouble the keeper. Even allowing for the alertness of the United trio, the play of the Everton forwards when the game did occasionally come their way was not at all inspiring. They were clever enough to a point, but when it came to close quarters, they accomplished nothing above the ordinary by reason of the fact that they were harassed by a resolute last line of defence, and in addition paid the penalty of somewhat feeble shooting. As a matter of fact there were but two really capable efforts to lower the United's colours, and these came from Makepeace and Bradshaw.

PLAY AND PLAYERS.
The game had only been going ten minutes when United obtained the lead. A smart tap from Nuttall to Meredith, and a swinging cross to Wall led up to success. The left winger transferred to the far side of Caldwell's charge, where West was in readiness and the centre headed into the net, both the keeper and Macconnachie being somewhat taken by surprise. Seven minutes from the close West again pounced upon a centre from Wall, and though the goal was apparently well protected the pivot of the United attack first breasted then hooked the ball into the net, and the discomfiture of the Evertonians was complete. As has been indicated the Everton forwards were not themselves, but they were up against a side that were all out to win, and one that gaves every ounce they possessed. Browell was well shadowed by Roberts. Uren and Bradshaw were not as effective as in the earlier matches; while Beare found more than his match in his tussles with Bell and Stacey. Gault, who deputised for Jefferis, though on the right side, has a good inception of the requirements of an inside forward, but as a line generally the men did not show much application of each other's needs. Fleetwood was a success at centre half, and Makepeace and Harris maintained the standard of Everton's half-back play, but there were occasional lapses in the last lines, which proved disastrous. Caldwell's display was mixed. In the earlier stages he gave rise to much uneasiness by the manner in which he fielded the ball, but in the later portion he brought off a couple of clever saves –one from close range, when he tipped a ball from Turnbull over the bar which compensated for much. On the United side Roberts was the star artist, with capable supporters in Whalley and Bell. In the front line, Wall was the most aggressive of a goahead set of forwards, and while Stacey was never at fault. Beale got through what little he had to do with good judgement. Teams: - Manchester United: - Beale, goal, Duckworth, and Stacey, backs, Whalley, Roberts (Captain), and Bell, half-backs, Meredith, Nuttall, West, Turnbull, and Wall, forwards. Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson and Macconnachie (Captain), backs, Harris Fleetwood, and Makepeace, half-backs, Beare, Gault, Browell, Bradshaw, and Uren, forwards. Referee R. Eccles.

EVERTON RESERVES 2 MANCHESTER UNITED RESERVES 2
September 23, 1912. The Liverpool Courier.
CENTRAL LEAGUE (Game 5)
Everton, who have yet to win their first home match, drew with Manchester United at Goodison Park, the score being two goals each. Some fast and enteresting play was witnessed, and the score about represented the run of the play. The game had hardly been in progress five minutes when Roberts, the United full back, turned a centre by Chedgzoy into his own net. Everton did not retain their lead very long, for from the centre kick the Manchester forwards worked down, and Woodstock equalised. Before the interval the Blues again secured the lead, Graham turning to account one of Davidson's accurately placed centres. After changing ends, play was fast and even, but nearing the end Woodstock again placed his side on level terms. Davidson was the pick of the home forwards, and in the defence Browell stood out as the ablest and most scientific defender. Everton: - Hodge, goal, Holbem, and Laurie, backs, Simpson, A. Browell, and Grenyer, half-backs, Chedgzoy, Smith, W. Murray, Gault, and Davidson, forwards.

EVERTON RESERVES 5 STOCKPORT COUNTY RESERVES 1
September 26, 1912. The Liverpool Courier.
CENTRAL LEAGUE (Game 6)
A good crowd witnessed the Everton Reserves and Stockport Reserves match at Goodison Park yesterday. Everton won comfortably. Gourlay doing the hat-trick. The first half was very one-sided, Everton doing all the pressing, and kept McIver fully employed, while Hodge only had to handle the ball twice, both as the result of good shots. Davidson scored the first goal, McIver stopping the ball over the line, and Gault who had hard lines with several of his shots, beat McIver for a second time. Gourlay scored twice, and then Hodge was called upon for the first time. Trotter shooting from the touch line, and Garrett from the penalty line. Gourlay scored the fifth and last goal for the Blues, while Smith put through for Stockport. The Everton goal had one or two narrow escapes in the second half, Cook hitting the bar with Hodge on the floor, and Bently just heading wide. For the visitors Garrett played finely, while Houghton was the better back. McIver apart from saving a penalty (from Gault), was very shaky. Smith being their best forward. For Everton, Hodge had practically nothing to do, the backs and halves played finely, while the forwards were in good trim. Everton: - Hodge, goal, Holbem, and Laurie, backs, McCulloch, A. Browell, and Grenyer, half-backs, Chedgzoy, Gourlay, Gault, Graham, and Davidson forwards. Stockport County: - McIver, goal, Graham, and Houghton, backs, Prout, Garrett, and Blair, half-backs, Troffer, Bentley, Cook, Smith, and O'Brein, forwards.

EVERTON
(A Draw 1-1 last season)
September 28, 1912. Evening Express, Liverpool
Aston Villa At Goodison Park.
Hampton Carried Off the Field.
Halse Scores Winning Goal For Villa.
By Rover.
More than usual interest was centred in the visit of Aston Villa to Goodison Park this afternoon by reason of the fact that they included in their ranks two former Liverpool favourites in Hardy and Harrop. Unfortunately the game was marred to some extent by the high wind. Everton were at full strength, Jefferis having recovered from his recent injury. Several changes were made in the Villa team. At the last moment it was decided to play Bache outside left instead of on the opposite wing. Hail crossing to the right. At half-back Whittaker took the place of Trainer. The teams are: - Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson and Macconnachie (Captain), backs, Harris, Fleetwood, and Makepeace, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, and Uren, forwards. Aston Villa: - Hardy, goal, Lyons, and Weston, backs, Whittaker, Morris, and Harrop, half-backs, Hall, Halse, Hampton, Stephenson, and Bache, forwards. Referee J.W.D Fowler.

It is worthy of note that Everton have not mastered Aston Villa at Goodison Park since October 1908.
35000 Spectators.
There was close on 45,000 spectators at the start and the game opened with a delightful swing. For a time the respective halves had the measure of the forwards. Neat work between Bradshaw and Uren led to Browell making a good attempt to get through, but he was prevented at the last moment by Lyons. At the other end danger threatened when Stevenson was given possession in front of goal, but fortunately for Everton he hesitated with his shot, Fleetwood nipping in and crashing the ball away. The game was being fought with great keenness, and a miskick by Lyons saw Uren race onwards only to succumb to a fair charge from Lyons, who had recovered smartly. The next incidents of note was a great shot by Halse, Caldwell responding with an equally fine save. Even after Caldwell had caught the ball there was danger, Hampton rushing in, Stevenson the home right back sending him to the right about. Caldwell had two more shots to stop, but neither of them caused him much trouble.

Everton Waken Up.
The Villa had slightly the better of the attack up to now, but Everton now livened up somewhat. After neat passing Browell got in a chance shot, which Lyons kept out with his feet. Then Beare and Harrop were engaged in a sprint down the home right, Beare forging ahead and from his centre Browell was prevented from shooting and Jefferis in his attempt placed high over the bar. Soon afterwards Makepeace gave Hardy a strong shot to dispose of. Boths sets of halves continued to show resolute tactics and the forwards were thus not given much latitude. As in the match against Manchester United the Blues forwards were finding their pretty close passing of little avail against determined halves and backs. The Crowd cheered when Hampton, the Villa centre was spoken to by the referee for attempting to trip Fleetwood.

Cries of “Play Up!”
There was not a lot of incident, the struggle for the most part being waged in midfield, and the forwards on either side having to play second fiddle to the halves. The spectators after one dull period raised the cry of “Play up to Blues' forward,” but it had no material effect. One dangerous centre by Bache was kept out by Stevenson with a timely header. Then followed some exciting work in front of the home goal. Bache was given a glorious opening, but he refused to shoot, placing over to the right, where Halse got in a low swift shot only to place wide. Play was taken to the other end and Uren was deservedly applauded for a centre, which dropped on the crossbar and rolled down the net. The teeth of the crowd was early set an edge when Hampton and Stevenson got

At Loggerheads.
The referee was running down the field after the ball when Hampton was to be seen kicking spitefully at Stevenson's legs. The latter was also showing a ruffled temper, and the shouts of the spectators caused the referee to look round, he stopped the game and spoke to both players. This tendency towards rough play was much to be regretted and there is no gainsaying the fact that this has generally happened of late years when the Villa visit Liverpool grounds. A breakaway by Hampton was followed by a clever sprint by Hall, who drove in a straight shot, Caldwell saving at the expense of a corner.

Half-Time Everton 0 Aston Villa 0
Comments.
There was not much to chosen between the teams. Chief honours went to the halves and backs on either side, the forward play never being of a high standard.

Everton Forwards Weak.
The second half opened with two early stoppages through first Bradshaw and then Weston being temporally disabled. The Villa were the first to attack, and Stephenson was only inches wide with a hard drive. A breakaway by Halse looked dangerous, only for Stephenson's header to go wide. The home forwards continued ineffective, and the Villa were the most troublesome. One spirited rush by Hampson was neatly checked by MaConnachie, who made good his clearance. Beare and Jefferis then made a valiant effort on the right, but were not allowed to shoot. Another determined attack by the Villa men ended in Halse having a hard shot charge down by MaConnachie. The Villa were next awarded a free kick in a very dangerous position, it was well placed. After some moments the home goal was in danger and one of the home halves brought temporary relief with a header, but the ball went to Hampton, who was steadying himself to shoot, when he was pounced upon by the home defenders. The ball however, went to Stephenson, who shot strong and true, Caldwell having to throw himself across the goal to clear. The home keeper was loudly applauded. In the meantime Hampton was

On The Ground In Agony.
And the game had again to be stopped. The injury seemed to be rather serious. He had to be carried into the dressing-room, where he had to be attended to by Dr. Whitford. The Everton forwards then got in one of their pretty passing movements, which ended in Browell driving hard towards goal. Hardy, however, was not caught napping, making a fine clearance. Fleetwood was temporary injury, but he was able to resume after a short stoppage. Another raid on the Everton goal, ended in a lucky escape for Everton. A Shot by Halse which seemed a certain scorer being kept out by MaConnachie. During Hampton's absence the Villa forwards more than held their own. Their efforts to open the scoring were more pronounced than those of the home men.

Hampton Returns.
Hampton then returned. The Villa continued to have the best of matters. On one occasion Bache drove in a hard shot, only to place over the bar. The Villa forwards seemed quicker on the ball than the home quintette, who were certainly below form. Halse made one determined effort to get through on his own but was spoiled by Stevenson, and a minute later Bache grazed the far sides post with a stinging shot. The Villa efforts were at last

Rewarded with a Goal.
Bache got in a clever centre, Hulme timed the ball to a nicety, and then sent in a terrific shot, which gave Caldwell little chance of saving, the ball entering the net under the cross bar.
Final result, Everton 0 Aston Villa 1.

EVERTON 0 ASTON VILLA 1
September 30, 1912. The Liverpool Courier.
EVERTON DESERVEDLY BEATEN.
VILLA THE BETTER SIDE
No one could begrudge Aston Villa their victory. They came to Goodison Park with their ranks shorn of several of the leading lights of the team, but with high hopes of lowering the pride of Everton, and in this they were successful. Truly they are establishing a pretty record in respect to their visits to Everton, for they have not been beaten there since October 1908. They certainly deserved victory on Saturday, for they wore deservedly the better team. In a game, which was always strenuous but never predictable of real thrills, Aston Villa had the best of the argument all through. In the matter of correct forward play there was a sad deficiency, and taken on the whole the game was very disappointing. Truth to tell, the Everton forwards never rose to the efforts required of them. As in the match against Manchester United, they relied too much upon close passing, and most of their attacks were nipped in the bud. They were neither clever individually nor effective as a line. The wingmen never prominent and what accurate centres were put in generally ended in the opposition getting possession and not the inside forwards. The Villa forwards were not particularly well balanced, but still, they were always dangerous in front of goal. Although neither of the keepers had a really busy afternoon. Caldwell had certainly more difficult shots to stop than Hardy. The chief honours went to the halves and backs. It was in a large measure due to their worrying tactics that the respective forward line were so effective. Both sides were indeed strong in defence, the sound and sure kicking of the full backs being one of the best features of the game.

In the first half the home forwards were rarely dangerous, but on the other hand, Caldwell had several warm shots to stop, and on one occasion he had to throw himself across the goal to keep out a fast shot from Halse. In the second half the Villa had much the better of the argument, even when playing four forwards, though Hampton having to be carried off the field injured. On Hampton's return after ten minutes' absence, the Villa forwards redoubled their efforts, and the home goal was hard pressed. The one and only goal came in the closing stages. Bache finished a neat run by an accurate centre, and Halse rushing up made no mistake in scoring. Browell did get in one straight shot, but Hardy never once looked like being beaten.

DISAPPOINTING BLUES.
The performance of the Everton forwards was indeed most disappointing. It was a complete reversal from the brilliant form, which marked their earlier displays, and the falling of was hardly accounted for by the keen methods of their opponents. Not only did the forwards lack their usual cleverness, individually, but they were less keen and determined, and their attempts at combination and shooting were feeble in the extreme. Beare and Uren were held well in check, and Browell was completely overshadowed by Morris. No fault could be found with the halves. Fleetwood was particularly prominent in defence, and he got his side out of many tight corners. Macconnachie gave a good account of himself at left back, and Stevenson, his partner, was also sound, while Caldwell was a reliable keeper. Halse, Bache, and Hall were the pick of the Aston forwards. Hampton's rushing and at times unfair tactics not availing his side much. Morris at centre half, was a tower of strength and Hardy, the ex-Liverpool player shaped well, as also did Whittaker. The Villa were, also well served by their full-backs. Weston and Lyons being a sturdy paid. Hardy had probably one of the quietest afternoons he has ever experienced at Goodison. Teams: - Everton: - Caldwell, goal, Stevenson and Macconnachie (Captain), backs, Harris, Fleetwood, and Makepeace, half-backs, Beare, Jefferis, Browell, Bradshaw, and Uren, forwards. Aston Villa: - Hardy, goal, Lyons, and Weston, backs, Whittaker, Morris, and Harrop, half-backs, Hall, Halse, Hampton, Stephenson, and Bache, forwards. Referee JWD Fowler.

BOLTON WANDERERS RESERVES 1 EVERTON RESERVES 0
September 30, 1912. The Liverpool Courier.
CENTRAL LEAGUE (Game 7)
Everton Reserves suffered their third defeat of the season at Bolton, where the Wanderers scored the only goal of the match through Hughes. It was a grit for Hodge was sadly at fault, and ought to have cleared easily. Moreover, the Blues were badly handicapped, as the game had only been in progess a few minutes when A. Browell left the field with a damaged leg, and took no further part in the contest. Everton henceforward played four forwards, and though they were clever at times, they could not overcome the Wanderers strong defence. Everton: - Hodge, goal, Holbem, and Laurie backs, McCollach, A. Browell (captain), and Grenyer, half-backs, Smith, Gault, Gourlay, Robinson, Davidson forwards.

EVERTON v. ASTON VILLA.
Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer - Monday 30 September 1912
In fine weather, before 35.000 spectators, at Goodison Park. Everton played their strongest side, whilst Villa were without Wallace. Hall going outside right and Bache outside left. Play was very keen the start. Villa having the best of matters, and Caldwell saved finely from Halse and Stephenson. Everton improved, and Hardy saved from Makepeace. Hampton was cautioned for rough play. Interval Everton none, Aston Villa none. Play was again fast on resuming, when there were 40.000 spectators present. Everton were first to become aggressive, and then Halse gave Stephenson a chance, but he headed wide. Hall later shot over, and Caldwell saved front Stephenson, Hampton was badly injured and carried off the field attended a doctor, but recovered and returned, Play became very keen, and Halse scored for the Villa before the finish. Result; Everton none, Aston Villa 1 goal.

DOWN AGAIN.
September 30, 1912. Evening Express, Liverpool
Midland Teams Triumph
Why Everton Failed.
By the Critic.
What is the matter with the Mersey teams? Defeats at the hands of Manchester and Midland clubs on successive Saturday's are not at all palatable, and for the time being enthusiasts are in the doleful dumps. The “Reds” and the “Blues” have sadly disappointed us. It is rather a pity too that two of the biggest “gates” one at Anfield and the other at Everton on the following Saturday should have witnessed the downfall of the local favourites. There was a hugh crowd to see the Villa-Everton game, but Like Liverpool the previous week, the “Blues” greatly disappointed their friends. One would not mind if they had played good football and had been beaten, but the fact is they gave a poor display of football that has rather shaken the confidence of their supporters. Everton were not themselves on Saturday by a long way, and as a matter of fact the game as a whole was a moderate affair being little of that “Class” football which used to be associated with the weavers of the Everton and Villa colours.

Deterioration in Villa-Everton Game.
There were rather too much feeling introduced –indeed “regrettable incidents” have been rather too frequent in recent meetings between the clubs. On this occasion Hampton, that plucky dashing player, who gives and takes hard knocks was again in the picture, and the exchanges of courtesies between he and Stevenson rather ruffled the game. Prior to this, however, Hampton had been spoken to by the referee for rushing at Fleetwood. It was rather a pity, from an Everton point of view, that the ruling official should have stopped the game where he did following the incident between Hampton and Stevenson. The referee did not see the passage at arms, or rather feet, and he followed the play right into the Villa goal, and when there seemed just the shadow of a chance that Everton might score, the referee saw the linesman's frantic effort to draw his attention to Hampton and blew his whistle. After the referee had administered a caution to the players the ball was thrown up in the Villa, half near the centre line. The “incident” occurred near the Everton goal and play ceased in the Villa goal, so that the official evidently tried to adjust the balance.

Hampton's Pluck.
With regard to the injury to Hampton, it was impossible to see from the press box what actually took place, but the centre seemed to be badly knocked out, and when I saw him in the dressing room under the care of Dr. Baxter, he was evidently in great pain. It was a great surprise to me, therefore, that he turned out again, and it only just showed what a pluckily footballer he is. Although one may be against his tactics, one cannot fail to admire his wholehearted efforts. I was pleased to hear the crowd, which by the way numbered 45,784, hive him much a hearty ovation when he returned to the field of play. Hampton takes a lot of risks, but I know of no other player who upsets an opposing defence as Hampton does.

Weak Everton Forwards.
As for the game itself it was a very ordinary one. The wind was rather high, and instead of keeping the ball on the ground the players nearly always lifted it into the air. This was a mistake on such a day. The Villa were undoubtedly the better side, they infused more “devil” into their play. The backs were sound and the halves played with such determination that the Everton forwards were never seen. Morris completely overshadowed Browell, and the Villa have no cause to regret Buckley's departure with such a man to fill his shoes. Harrop, too, was fine. He played a much better game on the wing than many of us expected and on the whole the middle line quite held the “Blues” quintette. One scribe last week, stated that the Everton forwards against Manchester United were the weakest lot he had seen this season. After Saturday's play there seems to be some justification for this drastic criticism. The failure of the forwards to do themselves justice was undoubtedly the cause of Everton's downfall. As a line they could do nothing right, and out old friend Hardy had a most delightful afternoon. He had but two shots to save. The Everton forwards were very weak, and one could not imagine, it was the same line, which has given so many sprightly displays in the past. Uren was all at sea but in fairness to the player, it should be stated that he was not too fit to commence with. The inside men too, were weak and Beare was the only one to show any dash or enterprise. The halves could not be blame for they were quite as good as the Villa trio, whilst the backs were also good, and Caldwell showed himself in his true colours.

Caldwell's Fine Saves.
Caldwell had his first real test and he came through the ordeal with distinct credit. He had no chance with the flying shot that scored, but he brought off some very fine saves. He was sure in his fielding and showed no trace of the nervous temperament he displayed at Derby. He was allowed plenty of room by the backs and he appreciated it. The Villa forwards gave him plenty to do. By the way the experimental line did extremely well. Bache was a general at outside right and Halse was the marksman, who provided the shots. The Villa have a good side despite the loss of such players as Ducat and Buckley.

 

 

September 1912