November 1887

Everton v St. James November 7 th 1887. The Liverpool Daily Post.
The exigencies of the struggle for the National Cup, on Saturday, deprived the patrons of the Everton Football Club of a visit from the runners up in last season's competition, and a hastily arranged fixture with a less pretentious organisation had to be substituted, and under the circumstances had an attendance approaching 2,000 was very good. St. Jame's lost the toss, and soon after the appointed time Williams set the globe in motion against the wind. Weir got possession, and a corner resulted, which Izzatt placed behind, hands off Watson when in a dangerous proximity to the visitors goal enabled Cook to relieve the pressure, but the repita was of a short duration, for Izzatt, receiving the ball from Weir, notched the first point five minutes from the start. For some time the Haydock defence was sorely taxed, but the somewhat erractic pasting of the home forwards enabled them to keep their charge intact. Eventually Chrisonhall broke away, and a good centre infused a little spirit into the game, but Dick easily relieved and after Anderton had fisted out a long shot from Weir, Everton forced a corner, which Higgins failed to improve. A bit of smart work between Cassidy and Farmer resulted in the latter putting the leather through out of the reach of the custodian. A fierce scrimmage in front of the visitors' upright ended in Watson heading over, and then Gibson put in a stinger, which Anderton repelled from under the bar. Not to be denied, Weir shot well from the other side, but Anderton again saved beautifully, and then Carney and Williams created a modeatary division, and reached the home goal line for the first time after thirty five minutes' play. After an abortive corner to Everton, Watson beat Anderton, and the visitors crossed over three goals to the bad. On restarting, the combination of the home forwards improved, and Izzatt and Watson had a nice run, and the later shot well in, Anderton returned, and Goudie spoiled a good chance by heading over. After two fruitless corners Everton secured a foul close up, and Watson scored. The latter was seldom out of Haydock territory, and Anderton picked up a daisy cutter from Izzatt. Pimblett turned aside shot from Higgins and Watson added another point. Everton continued a vigour attack, but Goudie and Watson shot wide. Farmer troubled Anderton and Cook relieved from a scrimmage. Gibson scored the sixth and Izzatt the seventh and just before the call of time Higgins concluded the home account by improving a beautiful centre of Izzatt, Everton thus winning by eight to love. Teams; - Everton; - Jolliffe, goal; Dick and Dobson (captain), backs; Higgins, Gibson and Weir, half-backs; Cassidy, Farmer, Goudie, Watson, and Izzatt, forwards. St. Jame's; - Anderton, goal; Cook and Plimblett, backs; Peake, King and Percival, half-backs; Carney, Richardson, Williams, Marsh and Chisenhall, forwards.

EVERTON V. HAYDOCK ST. JAMES
November 7, 1887. The Liverpool Mercury
This match was played on Saturday, on the Anfield-road Ground, in the presence of 1500 spectators and resulted in an easy win for the home team by 8 goals to nil. On the ball being kicked off, Everton forwards darted up the field, when Pimblett conceded a corner, but Izatt shot very wide. From the goal kick, the ball was soon back again, and after one or two nice saves by the visitors' goalkeeper, he allowed one from Izatt to go through, five minutes from start. A combined run of the home forwards looked dangerous, and Pimblett averted disaster to his side by kicking the ball half-way down the field. Chisenhall then put in some pretty play, but found the backs too strong for him to pass. Goudie and Weir next tried shots, which went wide, but a long kick by Dick enabled Framer to register a second goal. From the kick off Everton again became aggressive and the Haydock goalkeeper was called upon to negotiate shots from Watson and Higgins, which he did well. After Farmer had eased Carney of the ball, the latter greeted with shouts of “Well played,” amused the spectators by trying a shot at goal, which, however, went very wide. After Joliffe had take the goal kick, Gibson got possession and passed the leather to Watson, who scored the third goal just before half-time. On re-starting the home forwards again pressed, and Anderson was called upon to save time after time, which he did in grand style, but eventually Watson sent in a stinger which registered goal four, the same player adding the fifth shortly afterwards. From now till the finish the game was all on one side. Though a free kick by Weir, Gibson scored the sixth, the seventh, and Higgins wound the game up by placing the eight to the credit of Everton. For the winners, Gibson, Izatt, and Watson played well; and for the losers, the back division alone were conspicuous, the custodian contributing some remarkable saves. Teams; Everton; Jolliffe, goal; Dick and Dobson (captain), backs; Weir, Gibson and Higgins, half-backs; Izzatt, Watson, Goudie, farmer and Cassidy, forwards. Haydock- Anderton, goal; Cook and Primblett, backs; Peake, King, and Percival, half-backs; Carney, Richardson, Williams, March, and Chisenhall, forwards.

Local football appeal.
November 9 th 1887. The Liverpool Courier.
The appeals of Everton against the Bolton Wanderers was heard at a meeting of the executives of the Football Association in London last night, in this case the match was ordered to be replayed on Saturday next the 12 th instant, that between Everton and Bolton Wanderers to take place at Bolton. The substance of the Everton appeal was that the first goal claimed by the Wanderers was wrongfully given by Mr. Gregson the referee. Robert it appears sent in a long shot which struck the post, and was then put behind by Jolliffe, the Everton custodian. The Wanderers appeared for and were conceded a goal, notwithstanding the objection of the Everton Football Club umpire that no goal had been scored. If it is correct that the referee afterwards admitted that the ball passed outside the posts, it is difficulty indeed, to reconcile his action then and subsequently. It would therefore appear that Everton have been hardly used.

EVERTON V. BOLTON WANDERERS
November 14, 1887. The Liverpool Mercury
Played at Pike-lane, before 6000 spectators. The Everton men were, delayed by their train being late. Steele kicked off, and soon the Wanderers were attacking. Dick saving. This was followed by Farmer running well up, and Izatt kicking wide. Watson had a good chance, but missed his aim, but this was followed up by a grand piece of passing in which the whole of the Wanderers' forwards took part. Davenport finally kicking the ball over the bar. A miss kick by Parkinson almost let in Watson, but he recovered himself and Davenport got off again, Dobson finally stopping his hurried career. An exciting assault was now made on the Wanderers goal, which was only saved at the expense of a corner. Next a clever centre by Farmer gave Izzatt a chance, but he shot under. It was now the Wanderers turn, and some good play by Roberts nearly ended in the downfall of the Everton goal. Dick, however, cleared under difficulties, and again Everton did the most of the pressing, but it was only for a short time, and getting the ball from a free kick, Farmer ran on and obtained a grand goal, amidst loud cheering. A free kick off Weir was well placed by Roberts, the ball bobbling about in the Everton goal, but Gibson-eventually cleared. The next item was a claim for corner to Everton, which the Major disallowed. After the ball had been placed Everton had by far the best of matters. Weir played splendidly at half-back, and Kernan and Parkinson were repeatedly called upon; but they both responded grandly, and now and again the Wanderers burst away. Roberts was prominent with some good shooting, and once the ball appeared through, but the claim was disallowed. This was hard lines for the Wanderers, and from the kick-off Izatt screwed in off the line, Unsworth fisting very well. Smalley saved well a minute latter, with Brogan on the top of him, and the Wanderers did all the pressing, the ball being kept well in the Everton goal. Steel had a chance, but dallied too long, and a magnificent shot by Brogan was put outside by Smalley, the corner being kicked just wide. For a long time the ball was kept at the Everton end, and then Dick relieved, Izatt being again prominent. Brogan then came to the fore with a fine centre, but they could not beat the Everton backs. The visitors' forwards showed a good turn of speed. Owen issued an easy chance for the Wanderers, and the next moment Smalley saved well, but later the ball was put past him, but disallowed for being out of play. Brogan again troubled the Everton backs, but Smalley showed some good tactics, and at half-time Everton led by 1 goal. On restarting the Liverpool men showed up, and Unsworth fisted out two hot shots. Davenport ran the ball to the Everton quarters, but Dick stopped him. A change was now made in the position of the Wanderers, Steele being put half-back, Davenport centre, and Parkinson right wing, and the home team continued to have the best of it, and gained a dangerous corner, but Weir cleared, and Farmer raced away, Unsworth being called upon to save. Later on a free kick in the goal mouth looked dangerous for the visitors, but it was cleared, and Farmer got off to the other end. Unsworth was called upon to defend three times, and was cheered for his saves. The Wanderers afterwards had some good chances, but shot badly, until at last Owen centred and Brogan scored the equalising point for the Wanderers. There was only ten minutes to play, and the excitement ran high, Fleming having to retire through putting his shoulder out. Nothing further was scored, and the result was a draw -1 goal each –and darkness had crept on no extra time could be played. Afterwards the Wanderers lodged a protest against two of the Everton players. Teams; Wanderers; Bolton Wanderers; - Unsworth, goal; McKernan, and J. Parkinson, backs; Bollough, W. Parker, and Roberts, half-backs; Davenport, Brogan, W. Steel, Brogan, Owen and Howarth, forwards. Everton; - Smalley, goal; Dick and Dobson (captain), backs; Higgins, Gibson, and Weir, half-backs; Fleming, Watson, Goudie, Farmer, and Izzatt, forwards. Umpires, Messrs, Duxbury (Darwin), and Hughes (Northwich Victoria). Referee, Major Marindin.

Undecided cup tie
Everton v Bolton Wanderers.
November 14 th 1887. The Liverpool Daily Post.
For the third time these teams met on Saturday to try and vettis their claim as to which should have the honour of entering the second round of the English Cup. Bolton was again the scene of hostilities and a crowd of about 7,000 had gathered at Pike's lane to witness the encounter. A special was run from Tithebarn-street, which took down about 700 of the Everton devotees, whilst over a hundred went by an earlier train, amongst whom I noticed the president of the club, Mr. J. Houlding, who was accompanied by a batch of vice presidents. The instant the teams stepped into the field Mayor Marindin lined them up, and a start was made at once. The weather was favourable for football with the exception of a nasty haze, which hung about, making the light very bad. Steel kicked off, and Weir at once got the leather and kicked to the left, from which point Izzatt shot a bit wide. Davenport met the kick out and trotted off, but skied badly. Gibson, Weir, and Higgins them worked prettily and letting in Farmer, the latter called on Unsworth to clear. This he did smartly, and then Dobson pulled up Davenport and rent the ball to the right. Fleming then got off, but Roberts ran him into touch. Everton were next loudly cheered for a bit of very fine play indeed, which ended in Framer, again shooting in, but Unsworth handled the leather, and got rid of it very smartly. An appeal was made for this as it was thought the ball was under the bar. It was disallowed, but Everton still playing much superior game to their opponents, came up again. Fleming centred Goudie passed to the left, from which point the ball came flying in to Unsworth. Again an appeal unsuccessfully made, but after fifteen minutes' play the Everton back division burst through and sent the ball to Izzatt. This player raced away beautifully, until he was just about to be tackled by McKernan, when he touched the globe to his wrong man, Farmer, who finished with a beautiful goal, the Everton supporters shouting themselves hoarse after this success. From this point till half time some very clever saves were made by Smalley on the one side and Unsworth on the other, but no material advantage was gained. On one occasion the Wanderers got the ball through, but as Smalley had been deliberately held by Steel long before the ball reached him, the claim for goal was promptly disallowed. Not a moment was wasted after the teams crossed over. Goudie kicked off, and the Everton left wing at once made a spurt, the ball just going over the line into touch. The Wanderers rearranged their team hereabouts. Steel went centre half and Davenport centre forward. Play became much more even now and pace was very fast; Everton gained a couple of corners and then Weir saved an ugly rush, and the visitors' right wing got off. Watson sent in a real beauty, but just as the ball appeared certain to go through it fairly curled outside the post, a very near thing indeed. From the kick out the Wanderers made a furious dash. Higgins, Dick, and Dobson in turn kicking clear. At last Owen centred, one of the backs kicked the ball to the right close on the touch-line, and from this point Brogan got the ball. He paused for a second or two as there was an appeal of off side, but seeing no sign of it being attended to, he dashed the ball in and Smalley in attempting to reach it slipped and rolled over. The trotters were almost beside themselves at this turn in affairs as there was not more than ten or twelve minutes to play. Directly after this Fleming got possession, and when he almost had the Wanderers goal at his mercy McKernan rushed out and countering him, heavily rolled Fleming over, and to everyone's regret this splendid player was found to have his shoulder knocked out. From a throw in Izatt made a really brilliant run, but shot too soon, the ball went wide, and again the whistle sounded leaving the tie still undecided. It being almost dark, it was decided that it was not possible to play the extra half-hour. Teams; - Wanderers; - Unsworth, goal; McKernan and J. Parkinson, backs; Bullough, W. Parkinson, and Roberts, half-backs; Davenport, Brogan, Steel, Owen, and Howarth, forwards. Everton; - Smalley, goal; Dick and Dobson (captain), backs; Higgins, Gibson and Weir, half-backs; Izzatt, Farmer, Goudie, Watson and Fleming, forwards.

Prescot v Everton Reserves
This match was played on the Everton enclosure on Saturday, the home team, which included Murray, Cassidy, Briscoe, Costley, and Charteris, winning by five goals to nil; Stott the Prescot goalkeeper, proved an exceptionally good custodian; while Jones who was in charge of the Everton goal, only touched the ball three times.

EVERTON REVIEW
November 21, 1887. The Liverpool Mercury
With this tableau the curtain drops on the first act of the National Cup play, and in a little while at will perhaps be possible for clubs to conform to some extent to their list of fixtures. The repeated drawn games between these two clubs have had advantages. Whilst a considerable amount of inconvience has been occasioned to clubs through the derangement of their programmes, there can be no doubt that the now historic battle has increased the reputation of the Everton, in addition to which both organisations have benefit financially. On Saturday the early hour of commencement in no way affected the attendance, as when Struthers opened hostilities the ground was filled to repletion, the covered stand being as well packed as the unreserved spots were. The ground of course was rendered treacherous through frost, but, under the circumstances, it could hardly have been improved; and so the play was on the whole of high order –conspicuous more for kicking than dribbling and passing tactics. Everton got both their goals somewhat easily, and within five minutes of the kick-off, but they otherwise more shots at goal in the first half than the Wanderers. Soon after changing ends, Bolton were seen to great advantage, and attacked hard for a time, during which Davenport scored, and they certainty looked sure at one time if not of winning, of making the record even. Everton withstood this trying time with credit, and having once cleared the air play became less interesting, the locals, content with a majority of points, putting themselves in a defensive attitude, with the result that there were many delays through kicking out. For the winners, Smalley made no mistake; Gibson played magnificently, whilst Dobson and Dick were better than Parkinson and McKernan. Higgins was rarely prominent, and Weir, though doing good work in the latter half, was tame earlier in the game; Farmer, Goudie, Watson, and Izatt played well together, but Briscoe cannot be considered a success. Struthers (about whom all these renewed fights had been rendered necessary) was the weak spot of the Wanderers, and it is evident his day has passed. Nothing unforeseen occurring, Everton will meet Preston North End next Saturday, though it is stated that a protest has been lodged against Weir and Smalley's qualifications.

Bolton Wanderers v Everton
November 21 st 1887. The Liverpool Daily Post.
A bright sun being materially to make things look well. By the time the kick off took place, there would probably be 3,000 spectators present, but before half-time was reached there would be nearer 8,000 lining the enclosure. To the very second almost of the time given for the kick off that event took place. Dobson luckily won the toss, and defended the western goal. Struthers kicked off the ball traveled to the Everton left and McKernan was called on to clear. Gibson replied and Farmer well aided by Izatt dribbling up, Izzatt centred, and to the increase delight of the Evertonians Goudie drew first blood by a rattling shot. Great cheering resulted, as two minutes had scarcely elapsed from the start. Another start from the middle of the field was made, Hands against the Wanderers again let in the Evertonians, the ball was worked in front of the visitors' goal, and Watson was seen to let fly and bang went the ball past Unsworth, amidst tremendous. Two goals in less than five minutes looked bad for the Wanderers, but as events turned out, the game was won in this short space as Everton failed to score again. Davenport and Struthers worked down nicely, but Smalley got the leather away. Weir than stepped Owen's gallop when that player looked dangerous. Gibson then handled the ball –but the free kick came to nothing, and Farmer shot well in, Unsworth caught the ball and threw clear. Dick saved a nice attempt by Davenport and Struthers. Roberts replied with a long one, and Dick again repelled. Parkinson missed his kick, and Farmer got pass and gave the ball to Izzatt, who was floored by Hallough just at a critical moment. Gibson by a splendid header, again ensued trouble to the visitors, the ball ultimately going outside. Struthers next made off, Dick pulled him up, and Dobson cleared, Higgins combined the movement with a header. Weir crossed over to Goudie the latter to Farmer, who just shot outside. Davenport mulled a chance and Dobson came up in time to spoil a shot by Howarth. Again the Everton captain spoiled Davenport when getting into position, and Roberts shot just over the bar, a near shave. From a pass by Struthers Davenport screwed across, but Weir cleared. Brogan however, got away, but was beautifully deprived of the ball by Gibson, who received a round of applause. Izzatt, Goudie, and Watson made a neat combined rush, and Farmer just sent past the upright. The same player received from Weir, and screwed in, but Parkinson headed away. The pace was exceptionally fast, and the ball was kept going in a wonderful way, neither side lagging for a moment, and some fine play was exhibited, but a little less man play was very much to be desired. Weir showed how this could be done by robbing the burly Roberts is a wonderful neat way, Farmer shot, but the goal remained intact. Dobson next kicked away a goal shot by Brogan. Steel met the ball, and returned it with tremendous force just sufficiently high to have gone under the bar, but with wonderful smartness Smalley stopped its flight, and hit out. This was a superb save, and he richly deserved the applause, which was bestowed on him. half-time was reached with Everton two to nil. After a very short interval, the battle was renewed. Goudie kicked off, Weir passed to Izzatt, who was smartly tackled by McKernan Brogan worked his way down, but shot wide. The Wanderers now showed to advantage, but were equally well met. Gibson deprived Steel, and Higgins upset Brogan's calculation, letting Watson have a chance, which he made the most of until pulled up by Parkinson. Struthers shot wretchedly. Soon after Owen had a look in, but tambled, just when attempting to shoot, Brogan robbed Farmer, and sent to Struthers, but Dobson got in the way of this player, and Goudie had a shot, which Unsworth turned aside. After thirty minutes play in this half, the Wanderers came with a rush, Brogan shot in low, and although Davenport impeded Smalley before getting the ball, and for which he ought to have been given off-side. Smalley threw out, but as this placed Davenport onside, and as he was close in to goal, he dashed the ball past Smalley without the latter having a possible chance. The result was loudly cheered by the Bolton supporters who mustered strongly, but this was their last hope, as Everton now played more a defensive game until the whistle blew, leaving then the victors after a hard fought game by two to one. Teams; - Everton; - Smalley, goal; Dick and Dobson, backs; Higgins, Gibson, and Weir, half-backs; Izzatt, Farmer, Goudie, Watson, and Briscoe, forwards.

Bolton Wanderers; - Unsworth, goal; McKarnan, and J. Parkinson, backs; Sollough, Steel and Roberts, half-backs; Davenport, Brogan, Struthers, Own and Hewitt, forwards.

The Bolton wanderers in danger of a “spill.”
November 22 nd 1887. The Liverpool Courier.
The football team had rather an exciting adventure on Saturday afternoon on their way down to the railway station, after their defeat by the Everton club. The bus in which they were being conveyed from the football ground to town was a three-horse one, most of the Wanderers, being on the top, and proceeded all right until close to Hangiers Circus, when the horses became restive –the leader in particularly –and increased their pace considerably having gone a little way down Brunswick road, the bar broke, and the leaders becoming started by the rattling of the broken bar and chain behind, started into a gallop and commenced plunging, taking the bus down the steep incline at a very rapid and dangerous speed. The bus swayed from side to side to the great alarm of the passages. The Wanderers becoming frightening, urged the driver to pull up, but as he would not they began to get down and cut of the vehicle which still in rapid motion, some actually jumping from the steps by the drivers seat, alighting, most providentially, with no other injuries then rolled in the dirt and consequently bruises. The remainder, who also made their escape, as they touched terra form a were nearly all thrown down the no more serious consequences than a good shakings. The bus was eventually pulled up, and after making all safe the Wanderers re-embarked and proceeded as their journey, congratulating themselves upon their narrow escape.

Preston North End v Everton
English Cup-tie (second round)
November 28 th 1887. The Liverpool Daily Post.
A special train left Titheharn-street on Saturday, at 1-30, carrying the Everton team and some 700 or 800 supporters with them to the celebrated Deepdale ground. As it was known that the North Enders had scratched one, if not two matches which were set down for play during the week, it became evident that they did not intend leaving anything to chance, the result of this being that they turned out in splendid trim, and with the avowed intention of taking as many goals out of their opponents as possible. The result of six goals to nil was rather disheartening to the visitors, whose organisation was almost completely upset. Occasionally the spectators had glimpses of what they can do, but they were only flashes. With the exception of a brilliant shot by Farmer, which would most certainly have scored, had not Russell, the centre half back jumped up and hit it out with his hands in the most barefaced manner the North End were not in much danger, as Everton shot badly when they had the benefit of the strong breeze, and against the wind one shot only came near Addison. Dobson won the toss, and before some 7,000 or 8,000 spectators the ball was set going by Goddall against the wind. It at once became manifest, by the beautiful short passing of the North Enders, that they were in earnest, the ball being kept down from this effects of the breeze. Goodall shot just wide, Higgins robbed Gordon's rather smartly, and then Dewhurst shot in, Smalley saved, and a minute or so later he was again called on to clear one from Toss jun. From the kick-out, Gordon came away and shot across to the left, where Drummond met the ball, and with a swift low shot, brought down the Everton colours for the first time, after five minutes play. Weir Gibson, and Dobson spoiled a determined rush, and Richards got off on the right, only to be pull up by Graham. Izzatt next looked well, but Russell accounted for him. Smalley hit out one from Goodall and Farmer, after a short run passed to Watson who shot in well, but Addison kicked away. Watson came again, and s he was getting dangerous. Ross rushed out, and Watson was badly lamed. Dobson headed put a fine screw by Drummond. The latter came again but finding his way blocked , sent the ball to the right where Gordon taking deliberate's aim score a second goal after thirty-eight minutes play, and half-time saw Preston leading by two goals to nil. The teams now crossed over, and as the North Enders had the benefit of the breeze, which was if anything, stronger, than at the start, they made matters very uncomfortable for Everton. The play calls for no description as it was nearly all confined to the visitors' half, but, thanks to their splendid defences, only four more goals were added and three, too, all in the first twenty minutes –Goodall two, and Dewhurst and Ross jun, one each. During the remaining twenty-five minutes all their efforts to score was futile, and when the whistle sounded the North Enders had won as above. Teams; - Everton; - Smalley, goal; Dick and Dobson (captain), backs; Higgins, Gibson and Weir, half-backs; Izzatt, Farmer, Goudie, Watson, and Richards, forwards. Preston; - Addison, goal; N.J. Ross and Holmes backs; Graham, D. Russell, and Robertson, half-backs; Drummond, Dewhurst, J. Goodall, Ross jun, and Gordon forwards.

Everton Reserves v Park lane (Wigan)
November 29 th 1887. The Liverpool Courier.
Everton lost the toss, and kicked off. After a few minutes play, despite the strong wind, Everton pressed and scored in about seven minutes' Chateries heading through goal. Play after this was in Everton's quarters, but through the good goalkeepeing of Joliffe, the home team kept a clean state upto the half-time. Upon resuming Everton at once commenced a furious fusillade, and put on four goals, Parry being accountable for two and W. Jones, and Briscoe one each. To show the one sidedness of the game Joliffe the Everton goalkeeper was playing centre forward during the second half of the game. Teams; - Park-Lane; - R. Rimmer, goal; J. Pryor and J. Smalley, backs; W. Smalley and P. Smallery, half-backs; E. Baves, R. A. Shaw, R. Brimlow, CR Marklan, LS Macmahon, and J. Connell, forwards. Everton; - Joliffe, goal; G. Houldsworth and T. Fayer, backs; A. Gilder, F. Parry and W. Jones, half-backs; T. Scott Charteris, W. Briscoe, W. Douglas, and T. Costley, forwards.

EVERTON V PRESTON.
November 30, 1887. The Lancaster Gazette.
These teams played off their long delayed tie in the second round of the Association Cup Competition on Saturday, before 7,000 spectators. Everton played the strongest team possible, while the Prestonians had Hogarth off, and Ross was not well. A strong wind blowing along the field interfered with the play. North End started the game against the wind and the incline, and at the opening their passing puzzled their opponents, who had two shots to stop directly. Then Drummond scored with a long low shot. This roused the Evertonians, who defence improved, and for a long time the game was more open. Addison stopped his only shot during the match at the end of 17 minutes, and succeeding this North End pressed, Dick and Dobson, however, player had, and kept their opponents off until the end of 36 minutes, when Gordon scored with a deliberate shot. Half-time arrived with the score unchanged with the wind and the ground in their favour North End were continually pressing, but the visiting defence was stubborn in the extreme. Smalley stopped several capital shots, but was beaten by Goodall first, from out of a scrimmage, and then from a succeeding scrimmage, in which Watson was hurt and had to retire for a short time; but was ultimately no worse. The fourth goal was also shot by Goodall, Dewhurst putting a fifth by a grand long shot, and J. Ross, who all along had shot magnificently but been unlucky, contributed the sixth. All through the game the Everton backs played roughly, Dick in particularly. Several foul being given against him for ducking, &c. Dobson, too, deliberately upset Gordon in the first half, when he had the goal at his mercy. North End retaliated once or twice, but Watson's injuries was caused by a collision. North End won easily by six goals to none.

PRESTON NORTH END V. EVERTON
November 30, 1887 The Lancaster Gazette
These teams played off their long delayed tie in the second round of the Association cup competition on Saturday, before 7,000 spectators. Everton played the strongest team possible, while the Prestonians had Hogarth off, and Ross was not well. A strong wind blowing along the field interfered with the play. North End started the game against the wind and the incline, and at the opening their passing puzzled their opponents, who had two shots to stop directly. Then Drummond scored with a long low shot. This roused the Evertonians, whose defence improved, and for a long time the game was more open. Addison stopped his only shot during the match at the end of 17 minutes, and succeeding this North End pressed. Dick and Dobson, however, played hard, and kept their opponents off until the end of 36 minutes, when Gordon scored with a deliberate shot. Half-time arrived with the score unchanged. With the wind and the ground in their favour North End were continually pressing, but the visiting defence was stubborn in the extreme. Smalley stopped several capital shots, but was beaten by Goodall first, from out of a scrimmage, and then from a succeeding scrimmage, in which Watson was hurt and had to retire for a short time; but was ultimately no worse. The fourth goal was also shot by Goodall. Dewhurst putting on a fifth by a grand long shot, and J. Ross, who all along had shot magnificently but had been unluckily, contributed the sixth. All through the game the Everton backs played roughly, Dick in particular, several fouls being given in against him for ducking, &c. Dobson, too, deliberately upset Gordon in the first half, when he had the goal at his mercy. North End retaliated once or twice, but Watson's injuries were caused by a collision. North End won easily by six goals to none.