December 1889

EVERTON 13 WITTON 0
December 2 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
The recent splendid victories atBirmingham, and London have to a great extent atoned for the defeat of the Evertonians by Preston North End and on Saturday a capital number of Spectators showed that confidence, had been restored. The only alteration in the home team was that Weir whose arm was broken at Wolverhampton two months ago, resumed active operations, and supplanted Frank Sugg as centre half, J.holt did not play. The teams as follows: - Everton: - Smalley goal, Hannah (Captain) and Doyle, backs, Cain, Weir (J), and Parry half-backs, Latta, Brady, Geary, Chadwick, and Milward, forwards. Witton: - Shaples, goal, Tattersall, and Frankland backs, Whiteside, Smith (J) Fletcher, half-backs, Dickson, Woolacer, Smith (H), Coupe, and Turner Forwards, Umpires Messrs H. Brocklehurst, and W Richards, Refere, Mr. Gough . The Everton men on arriving upon the ground were greeted bestiality with cheers from 5,000 throats. Geary kicked off, and the Witton right wing made an attempt to breakaway the ball, however, being taken off them and returned well into Witton quarters. There was an excellent opening for Geary, which was spoiled by Frankland, who came on the scene at an opportune moment. The Visiting right wing again became prominent, though its work was only of as much utility as on the previous occasion. The whole line of the Everton forwards then made a grand movement up the field. Geary missing another chance, while Latta sent in a fine shot, which was slightly too high. The Witton left now came in evidence, but their efforts were completely nullified by Hannah, Chadwick was their next on turn for a shot, and Milward followed with a couple of attempts which, were not far from their mark. A highly exciting scrimmage ensued in front of the goalkeeper all the Everton forwards running fast shots in quick succession on the defence; but the Witton backs, by dint a great perseverance and a certain amount of luck in rushing wildly about, at last succeeded in removing all apprehension as to the safety of their charge for the time being. It was only for the time, however, as after the lapse of a few seconds Chadwick kicked into the hands of the goalkeeper, who being made to retain the present, considerately dropped it behind him. For the next ten minutes there was only one club in it, and that was not Witton, but the visitors were happy in preventing further score. When they did eventually move down it was only to be repelled and the performance was continued at the Witton end. Beautiful shots were sent along, but the Witton, backs and goalkeeper put in a wonderful amount of work, and averted dangers which surrounded them with great ability. Some not very exciting exchanges were afterwards made until the home men, making combination their cause found an effect through Chadwick aid. After this there was not the slightest cessation in the energy of the attack, and from a pass close to goal by Chadwick a third goal was easily scored by Geary. Sharples disgusted himself by grandly fisting out some difficulty shots, but just before half-time Geary again beat him. Half-time result, Everton 4 goals, Witton nil.

The Witton goalkeeper, on taking his position at the bottom of the ground was received with vociferous cheer. A couple of minutes after the restart Chadwick scored from a neat pass by Milward near to the goalmouth, and he followed this up with another successful shot but a short time after. Then Cain claimed the credit of notching the seventh goal, kicked from long range. A fierce and regular attack was then poured on the Witton custodian who discharge his duties with skill for some time but he was forced at length to succumb, Geary getting in a beauty, from the left after capital centre by Milward. The Witton forwards introduced a slight novelty into the game by visiting the home defence and forcing a corner. The ball, however, was kicked behind, and from the goal kick the Anfield lads resumed their usual position. A rapid sequence of passes occurred at the feet of the goalkeeper and the energetic backs, Latta outing on the finishing touch by raising the total to nine after the ball rebound of the bar from Milward shot. Double figures were next reached through Milwards hardwork, Geary five minutes later obtained the eleventh point, and ten minutes after that the same player had the honour of making the score twelve. Half minute from time Brady score number thirteen. Final scored Everton 13, goals, Witton nil.

BIRKDALE 0 EVERTON RESERVES 3
December 2 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
These teams met for the second time this season on the sport ground before very few spectators. When the clubs previously met on the Anfield enclosure the home team were victorious by 9 goals to nil.
On Saturday Kisiclowski kicked off with the wind in his favour, when the visiting forwards at once rushed down, but Edwards as quickly returned to centre. Deane than acured, and after a smart run he centred beautifully to Orr, who called upon Guest the home custodian to use his hands. The visitors continued to press, and Merchant was forced to concede a corner, which, however, proved abortive. A moment later Everton were awarded a foul right in the goal mouth, but disaster was averted by a timely kick on the part of Edwards. The home string than had a look in, but it was only momentarily, as after J.Mercant had rushed up and made a futile attempt, the ball was quickly returned, and Edwards proved a stumbling block. The visitors were not to be denied and continued to press; but although Nidd had several chances he failed owing to his erractic shooting. Walton then sent in a rattler, but Guest proved equal to the occasion. Another hot shot from the foot of Kirkwood caused the home custodian to concede a corner. Nidd took the kick, and placing the ball in a favourable position, Orr notched the premier point. After the kick off the Evertonians returned to the attack, and in less than five minutes Orr had placed another goal to his credit. Kirkwood repeating the performance a moment later. Half-time Everton 3 goals Birkdale nil. Final Result Everton 3 goals Birkdale nil.

EVERTON REVIEW
December 2 1889.
The Liverpool Mercury
Everton's first performance before Londoners was excellent, having made a successful attack at Birmingham, they matched on to the capital in high spirits, and on Monday duly appeared at the Oval, the scene of many of the most famous matches in both football and cricket. Here they met old opponents in the London Caledonians, and, excelling at all points won in a common canter by 6 goals to 1. Meeting and receiving praise in every direction for there brilliant and, gentlemanly play. On Tuesday they were at Leyton, the Essex County Ground, pitted against the Casuals, a much superior team to the Scotch one of the previous day. Though not so strong as at first selected and they again carried all before them, running out victors with almost the identical heavy score-7 goals to 2. Good wins needs no bush''13 goals to 3 against admittedly powerful exponents speak for themselves-but ”tose curse's as others see u” the following comments of the metropolitan critic of the ”sportsman will be found intesting: - At Kennington Oval the Lancastrians managed to wipe out the defeat which they sustained at the hands of the Caledonians on the Everton ground last Easter, gaining a very easy victory by 6 goals to 1. If the visitors had played up with the same dash and spirit in the second half as they did in the first, the score would have been considerably supplemented, but as it was they contended themselves by playing a waiting game, and to a certain extent simply defending their goal, proceedings which, as may be imagined, were of a very monotonous description. Everton in the first half proved to the spectators present that their lead in the League championship up to November 16 (When Preston North End dispossessed them) was by no means a lucky one. The defence of the backs was impenetrable, whilst the forwards played a brilliant passing game, the whole side showing the most perfect combination” such was the favorable impression made by the Everton on completing their opening engagement in London, and, though the praise is great, the good opinion, was emphasized for the clever manner in which the Casuals were discomfited, when the writer says- “The game was stubbornly contested throughout. Despite the greasy state of the ground the play was fast and interesting, both sides working hard. The visitors were, however, by far the smarter lot, dribbling, kicking and passing to perfection, whilst they also defended grandly. Unfortunately the Casuals' team underwent numerous alterations at the last minutes, which had the effect of considerably weakening the side; but notwithstanding this, they played with excellent spirit, and made a much better stand against their formidable rivals than the Caledonians did at Kesingston. Moon, in goal, defended brilliantly, and it was mainly due it his efforts that the score of 7 goals to 2 against the Casuals was not heavier. Everton are to be congratulated on the success of their first trip to London. The tour proved a happy hit, and, as they have made friends among the Cockneys, they will be welcomed when next appear in the capital. There is but one reget-a chivalrous reget-and that the Casuals they met did not included all seven players, instead of only two, of the Corinthians team that beat North End. The substitutes were good, but the originally selected team would have been preferable, as “foeman more worthy of their steel.”

Everton were welcomed home on Saturday, when they again tackled Witton and again won as they pleased, the 6 goals victory having expanded into the formidable shape of 13 goals to 0., so that Everton have made 26 successful aims at goal against 3 as the outcome of three successive matches-a week's work that will be seldom surpassed. The Witton fixture is in the character of an off-day incident, and calls for little notice. The most interesting feature to be record is the reappearance of Weir, after two mouth's absence nursing the broken arm, he received at Wolverhampton. Weir was falteringly received, and played centre-half in the place of Holt who is enjoying a holiday. Witton though so severally beaten, never seemed disheartened. They stood up gallantly all through, and made many plucky but vain attempts to break away. Doyle and Hannah were so effective in tackling the raiders that Smalley had nothing to do but watch events whilst Parry, Weir and Cain, especially the two former, looked out for work, and disposed of it on a polished fashion. The forwards were in splendid trim. Played a downright hard, unselfish game, and were practically irresistible. Had it not been, for the super-excellent goalkeeping of Sharples, and the good defence of Tattersall and Frankland, the defeat would certainly have been heavier, for the shots that scored were in small proportion to those combated. Witton half-backs, too were seen to considerable advantage, such (centre) and Dickson's and Foley (right wing) were neat in their play, but generally the forwards were too weak in the face of the strong home defence. To day Everton are at Denton and as regards the Lancashire Cup-tie a fortnight hence, we understand the Everton and Blackburn Rovers Reserves will fight it out.

DENTON 0 EVERTON 3
December 3 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
This annual match was played at Denton yesterday, in beautiful football weather, before 3,000 spectators. The home team were fully represented, and the visitors were short of Parry and Smalley, Walter Sugg keeping goal in place of the latter named player. Two forties were agreed upon, and Everton started the ball at three o'clock. Geary, Latta and Brady were applauded for a pretty dribble, but Lowe saved beautifully. The home team aided by good play on the part of Marshall, Seddon, and Plant visited the Everton quarters, but Hannah came to the rescue with a tremendous kick to the centre. Everton gained a corner, but it was badly played, and Marshall got off to the centre where Hannah pulled him up grandly, and Geary and Chadwick put in a couple of terrific shots which were well saved by Lowe amid applause. Latta scored after a good run by Milward. Score at half-time-Everton 1 goal Denton nil. Upon, resuming Milward centred beautifully to Chadwick, who immediately dashed the ball through and scored a second goal. Geary, Chadwick, Hannah and Doyle were each applauded for fine play and severely tested the excellent defence of the home team. Numerous corners fell to Everton and although well placed by Milward and Latta nothing resulted. Holt was cheered for a magnificent dribble down the centre, but the finishing stroke by Latta just went wide of the goals posts. Geary scored a third for Everton and the Final result was Everton 3 goals, Denton nil.

Everton: - Walter Sugg, goal, Hannah (Captain) and Doyle backs, Cain, Holt, and Kirkwood, half-backs, Latta, Brady, Geary Chadwick, and Milward forwards. Denton:- Lowe, goal, Seddon and Cooke, backs Clarke, Edwards, and Arrandale, half-backs Holt, Marshall, Williams, Seddon, and Plant, forwards

EVERTON FOOTBALL CLUB
December 6 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
Sir- The executive of the above club are going the right way about “killing the goose that lays the golden egg” It would be interesting to know upon what ground they are charging sixpense admission to witness next Saturday's match. If they put to any expence in bring Notts County down it would make all the difference, but as well known to every one, who takes an interest in football matches they pay in a fixed sum to all visiting teams in League matches, and this can't be their reason. Perhaps they will kindly inform their patrons why they must pay 100 percent, more than usual. Considering the support they receive their usual charges are amply stiffcient to meet expenses and leaves a good balance to the credit of the club-yours etc G Unsworth, 103, Granston-road, Everton dec 5 1889.

Sir- I notice that the charge for admission to the Everton v Notts County match on Saturday next will be sixpence. I think this is a most foolish move on the part of the executive, and one well calculated to do the club an minense injury, while depriving it of all sympathy from its large following. It is also must unfair to those old friendlys (Most working men) who have stood by the club through thick and thin, and by their support brought it to its present high position in the football world. Having got a good team together, and a very large support from the public, they now show their appreciation of the assistance received from the working public by doubting the prices of admission, notwithstanding the fact that at the present time they take more in gate money than any Association club in England, and that the usual charge at other League club grounds in Lancashire is threepence and fourpence. In the case of North End and Bootle matches there are very few who object, but to charge extra for every decent match (As seems to be their intention) is a far different matter. “Nothing succeeds like success” is very applicable to the matter of attendance, as a well filled ground adds to the excitement and interest, consequently attraction of the game, thereby increasing the attendance, which if the extra charge is persisted in will most probably tall away. Hoping that the good injudgement display by the management hitherto will not fail them in this matter-yours etc, A.Wellwisher, Dec 5 1889.

Sir- Will you allow me on behalf of many others to ask the Everton Football Committee on what grounds they justify their double charge for admission to the Notts v Everton match on Saturday next? Whatever grounds (More or less justified) they might have had for an increased charge to the Preston North End match are entirely absent on the present occasion, and a little enlightenment's as to why this is thus will be eagerly received by thousands of Everton supporters. A steady attendance weekly of perhaps double the number that attends the Bootle matches ought in reason to satisfy the Everton executive, and a safistactory explanation will be hard to find. Might we not therefore with justice exclaim “Greedy Everton”? As a little opposition to the Everton monopoly would be wholesome it is a pity that Bootle plays away next Saturday, as doubless numbers would have patronised them as a protest against the grasping policy of Everton, however, was the Everton supporters have the alterations of staying away from the Everton ground and if this course is pursed by a considerable number it may have the effect of bring the committee to see the some slight consideration is due to the public if they wish to maintain their present important position in the football world. Yours etc Lemon Drops, Dec 5 1889.

EVERTON REVIEW
December 7, 1889.
The Liverpool Courier.
That the Everton star is now fairly in the ascendant, event in the South and more recently at home give the amplest proof. Evidently the lesson imparted by North End last had a salutary effect, for now the team is acquitting itself in a style far superior to any of its earlier effects, and as progress continues to be made, it will take a raking combination to measure its strength before the season is over. It will readily be recalled to mind that, following their disastrous defeat by Preston North End, the Everton defeated Aston Villa, at Birmingham by two to one, and travelling still further South, the London Calendonians and Casuals were beaten on successive days by six to one and seven to two respectively, results which furnish reasons for regret that the Southern clubs estimated the powers of the Liverpool men so lightly. In the light of such splendid victories the game with Witton was regarded in the spirit of a forgone conclusion, although, of course no one was prepared for the sensational scoring which ensued. There was only one change in the Everton ranks, and as Holt was indulged with a well earned rest, Weir who had been invalidated since the match at Wolverhampton, took his place in the team. On the other hand considerable changes had been made in the Witton combination, notably forward, and as the result shows, the Witton of today differs very materially from the Witton of a couple of years ago. Out played from the start, a quartette of goals were registered against them during the first half of the game, the excutants being Chadwick and Geary who scored a couple of points each. It was during the after-part of the game, however, that the onslaught was greatest, and surely no team were ever so mercilessly treated as the unfortunate Wittonians now were. The industrious goalkeeping of Sharples was of no avail, for with backs and forwards beaten, it was one man pitted against eleven, and as a consequence, goals were scored with amazing rapidity. Chadwick notched a couple more, these being followed by one from Cain. Witton were absolutely powerless to attack, and taking the fullest advantage of their opponents' weakness, the Evertonians rushed six more points, and finally won by the extraordinary number of 13 goals to nil. It is worthy of mention that five of the goals were scored by Geary, four by Chadwick, and one each by Latta, Brady, Cain and Milward.

Early in the week the Evertonians paid their second visit top Denton and as their fame had evidently proceeded them, three thousand “Jolly batters” turned out to witness the play. Parry and Smalley were absence of the latter Walter Sugg made his debut in goal with credit to himself and to the advantage of his club. Having satiated themselves in the manner of goal-getting, the Evertonians were on this occasion satisfied to play what, under such circumstances, is usually regarded as an exhibition game, consequently a goal by Latta was all that was scored during the first period of play. Afterwards the Scotsman added a second, and Milward supplemented the effort. Everton won their fifth successive victory by three goals to nothing. Dentonians no doubt bring well pleasant by escape on such easy terms. In the first match of the season in Everton Reserves defeated Birkdale by nine goals to nil, but on the teams meeting in the return fixture the Reserves had to be content with a three goals to nil victory, but had it not been for the erractic shooting of Nidd the score might easily have notched double figures. Orr (2) and Kirkwood succeeded in notching the points for the Reserves.

EVERTON 5 NOTTS COUNTY 3 (Game 36)
December 9, 1889.
The Liverpool Mercury.
This return League fixture came off at Anfield on Saturday in the presence of some 6,000 spectators, being the smallest attendance yet assembled at any important match this season. The committee found it absolutely necessary owing to the great expenditure, which occurs all the year round, to raise the prices of admission to keep them out of debt, and when they have accomplished their aim they will have no hesitation in reverting to the popular prices. The weather was fine, but the overnight rain softens the ground considerably, thereby causing it to be on the heavy side. The Notts team was the same as that which beat Everton by 4 goals to 3 in the first engagement. The homesters underwent no change from the usual one . Everton: - Smalley, goal, Hannah (Captain), and Doyle, backs Parry, Holt, and Cain, half-backs Latta, Brady, Geary, Chadwick and Milward forwards. Notts County: - Toone, goal, McMillan, and McLean, backs Ferguson, Calderwood, and Shelton half-backs, May, Smith, Oswald (Jas) Oswald (James) (Captain), Daft forwards. Referee Mr Heath. Hannah won the toss, and chose to play with the wind and down the incline, but with the sun against him. James Oswald whose appeared after the accident to his collarbone kick off, and some interchanges soon took place between the respective backs. At length McLean kick out before he could get rid of the home left pair. From the throw in Brady got hold and tested Toone with a speedy shy but the custodian neatly fisted out, thus enabling his side to travel up, Daft's final however, going wide of its mark. Geary now went along trickily with Latta but-the latters's shot went flying over. James Oswald got his forwards in line, and play was carried towards Smalley who succumbed to Smith, giving Notts the lead seven minutes from the start. The homesters now asserted themselves, and sorely taxed the defence of the visitors Brady forcing a corner, which was soon followed by Latta putting one out of the reach of Toone. An appeal for off side was allowed. Again attacking the home front being well fed by the halves bore down on Toone, a shot from Geary being worked by McMillan on the upright and one from Milward going to the side. From hands John Oswald had a chance, but his elevation was bad, and the leather went spinning over the bar. With a determination to get on level terms, Everton brought out the whole of the Notts defence, in which McLean was conspicuous and were successful in stemming the fold. Daft eluded Cain in his run up and passed over neatly to May, who beat Smalley for the second time with a rather soft looking goal. This last success was greeted with “serve them right for 6d.” It was now the turn of the homesters to score goals for instead of falling away in their play they went at it with increased energy and Parry, nicely intercepting May, crossed to Geary, but failed to reach the ball, before Calderhead relieved. After the centre had put to side Everton had a free kick, which Doyle took, and giving to Latta, that player was not long before he beat Toone with a scorcher. Great pressure, in which were two corners was brought to bear in the visiting quarters by the Everton forwards, but nothing tangible resulted until Latta, from a grand pass by Geary equalised with a swift and well directed shot, shot amidst tremendous enthisium. Still forcing the play the Evertonians would not be denied and Toone had to save in quick style, two shots from Chadwick and Brady, but he failed to stop one from Latta who put his side on the lead with a beautiful goal; and before the cheering had subsided he gave Brady a chance which was availed of and the Notts colours were lowered four times in the short space of ten minutes. To disheartened with the sudden reversal of fortune, James Oswald and his forwards looked ominous when Hannah stepped across in the nick of time and dispossessed the international rather cleverly, when in the set of trying to put one through. Brady made another attempts to register, but was wide, and half-time arrived with the score Everton 4 goals, Notts 2 goals. On changing ends Toone came for major share of applause for his excellent performance between the uprights for, although he had allowed his charge to be taken four times, he had done wonderful work, and Latta's shots were too speedy to be stopped. Re-starting, Geary set the ball in motion, Daft was the first to fasten on it, and made tracks for the home quarters' but Cain was a barrier to him and soon the game was taken up on the Everton left, Milward sending two flying over the bar, and Chadwick crewing into Toone hands. McLean, passing over to John Oswald, who raced down at length gained relief, but a futile corner only accrued to James Oswald. From a free kick, the Anfielders were again dangerous and failed to get the upper hand of Toone, who returned sharply, and another futile corner occurred. After James Oswald had test Smalley, who threw out. Latta was loudly cheered, as he dashed along, and Shelton concede a futile corner. At length Geary scored the fifth goal for Everton and Notts them had the best of the game and Daft scored for Notts in the last minutes, final result was in favour to the homesters. Result Everton 5 goals Notts County 3 goals.

EVERTON REVIEW
December 9, 1889.
The Liverpool Mercury
Everton were engaged in their return League match with Notts County, who brought the same team to Anfield on Saturday that had matched a lucky win from Everton at Trent Bridge, in October. James Oswald it will be seem thus returned play, after several weeks' absence through injury received against Burnley, and Notts in control of their popular skipper got into rapid stride, much resembling their tactics in the first match, early scoring 2 goals. Everton amid some jeers anent the extra tariff then took in the serious position of affairs, and were soon attacking powerfully. Latta found an opening, but was ruled to be off-side and he avenged that ill luck with interest bagging three goals in success with terrific shots. Brady followed with a fourth the quartet of goals being obtained within the space of ten minutes. In the second half Everton kept Notts pretty well on the defence until Geary scored, but towards the close the visitors displayed greater energy, their spurt being reward with a goal, a hard and well contested game ending in favour of Everton by 5 goals to 3. Everton have thus given Notts a Roland for an Oliver. Toone made a good impression in goal, some of his saves being marvellous, and he received able assistance from McLean, but McMillan could not shield the goalkeeper so well, Latta proving far too clever for him. Ferguson and Calderhead were excellent backs, and of the forwards May and Smith on the right, combined effectively with James Oswald, but Daft and John Oswald were not overpowering, thing contributing useful work now and again. The home defence was not seen at its best, Smalley had not a great deal to do, nor did he do that little uniformly well, whilst Doyle and Hannah both seemed stiff at the start though they soon got into better stride, and then showed good defensive tactics. The half-backs with Holt centre and Weir standing down, too were slow at the opening but, like the backs, played exceedingly well afterwards, their feeding of the forwards being very accurate. Latta stood out boldly amidst Everton vanguard, his all-round play was perfect, and runs were grand, Shelton being frequently played to a standstill, whilst his kicking not having been truer or at greater forces. Brady partnered Latta well, but lacked his colleague's dash, Geary fed his wings wisely, but found the ground unfavorable for his unique sprinting, and on the left Chadwick and Milward did a lot of good work, the touches of the former being very clever. Considering the heavily ground the pace of the game being great. Both sides worked hard and Everton's hard victory was attained in one of the best games witnessed at Anfield.

EVERTON V NOTTS COUNTY
December 9, 1889.
The Sheffield Independent
Played at Everton. About 6,000 people assembled at the Anfield ground at Liverpool, to see the return match between the above clubs. Notts had proved victorious when the two eleven's met at Trent Bridge, and on Saturday the Midland team quickly scored two goals, Latta soon obtained one point for the home side, who improved as time went on, and for whom Latta added two more goals, and Brady a fourth. Everton leading at half-time by four goals to two. The home team pressed for some time afterwards but without effect, and then Notts missed some chance's through bad shooting. Towards the close reach side obtained a goal Everton winning by five goals to three.

Sheffield United v Everton.
The following team will represent Sheffield United today against Everton at Bramell Lane: - Howlett, goal; A.N. Other, E. Stringback; Hudson Hobson, Mack; Robertson, Bakewell, Dr. Clark, or G.H. Aizlewood, Duncan, Calder.

SHEFFIELD UNITED V EVERTON
December 10 1889.
The Sheffield Independent
Sheffield United 1, Everton 10
The famous Everton, who at present hold the second position in the Football League competition paid their first visit to Sheffield yesterday, and at Bramell Lane were opposed by Sheffield United. The weather was unfavourable, however, that though the attraction was great, only about 1,000 spectators were presented. The visitors were strongly represented. The only changes in the team who had beat Notts County on Saturday being Frank Sugg in goal in place of Smalley and Kirkwood half-back instead of Cain. United had the assistance of G. Bakewell, of Derby County, and expected that of R. Thompson of Sheffield Wednesday, but the latter did not play, and G.J. Groves was substituted. At 2.40 Geary started the ball rolling towards Bramell Lane on behalf of Everton, who at once made an aggressive movements, Howlett, the home custodian, had quickly to stop a hot shot from Milward, and immediately afterwards he was twice called upon again to save his citadel from downfall soon at the other end Duncan gave Sugg a shot to stop, but it was but feeble, and the big Everton goalkeeper easily dealt with it. A corner to United was put behind by Mack, and after Howlett had saved at the other end the home team got another fruitless corner. The Everton forwards then showed a fine piece of combination, and after Howlett had again saved, Chadwick scored the first goal for the visitors, the ball going through off the crossbar. Two minutes later Latta scored a second goal for Everton. Some three of four minutes later Chadwick added a third point, and the Evertonians going away from the kick off with a dash a fourth was registered by the same player from a pass by Brady. The visitors, it will be seen had much the best of the play, and the combined attacks of their forwards were much admired. Bakewell, for the United occasionally broke away and made a good run, but he received but little support. The Everton backs and halves easily repulsed any advance of the Sheffielders, and shortly before half-time arrived Kirkwood from half-back scored a fifth point for the Liverpool men. With a score of five goals to their credit the Evertonians at the commencement of the second half, appeared to take matters easily, and United made several vigorous attacks in which Bakewell was conspicuous. Aizlewood once had a good opening but his shot was weak and easily stopped. At this time the United were having the best of the players and eventfully amidst applause, Bakewell scored a clever goal for them. The Everton men resumed their activity, and after making Howlett save, twice in quick succession, Everton scored a sixth goal from the foot of Geary. A period of slow play followed. Groves at back occasionally put in some good kicks for the home team and Mack worked hard and well at half-back, but the United were apparently quite outclassed. An injury to Fraser stopped the game for a few minutes, but he was able to resume playing. Eventually somemore brilliant play by the Evertonians ended in Geary shooting a seventh goal. Two minutes later the same player added an eight and immediately dash from the restart with the ball give a ninth, Geary again doing the trick. After this Bakewell made a fine run, and passing several opponents was very near scoring for the United, but his shot was a little too wide. Darkness was now coming on and it was difficult to see the game. The Sheffielders several times got within range but their shooting was not accurate, and just before the whistle sounded Geary made the Everton score reach “double figures” by kicking a length goal. The game was most one-sided and uninteresting, the clever visiting team having matters almost entirely their own way. Players and officials; - Sheffield United: - C.H. Howlett, goal; L. Gilmartin and G.J. Groves backs; S. Mack, D. Fraser, and J. Hudson, half-backs; G.H. Aizlewood, Bakewell, W. Robertson, J. Duncan, and W. Calder, forwards. Everton: - Sugg, goal; Doyle and Hannah (captain), backs; Parry, Kirkwood, and Cain, half-backs; Milward, Chadwick, Geary, Brady and Latta, forwards. Umpires, W. Sugg and W. Madon Referee, Mr. W.F. Beardshaw.

SHEFFIELD UNITED 1 EVERTON 10
December 10, 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
In dull showery weather, before an attendance of 1,000 spectators, the Everton team paid their initial visit to the cutlery town to meet the newly formed professional team at Bramall lane. Sheffield United the home team, was straightened by Groves, of the Sheffield club whilst on the Everton side one alteration was made in the advertised list, Parry taking the place of Holt. Everton: - Sugg goal, Hannah (Captain), and Doyle, backs, Parry, Cain, Kirkwood, half-backs, Latta, Brady Geary, Chadwick, and Milward, forwards. The United were successful in the toss, and had the advantage of what little wind there was. Play opened slowly, but after fifteen minutes play Chadwick scored for Everton, and two minutes later put on the second point for the visitors, and within four minutes Chadwick added other two from splendid crossing by the whole of the Everton forward division. Kirkwood added another goal. Half-time Everton 5 goals, Sheffield United nil. On crossing over Everton had much the best of the play, but United were first to score, by the aid of Bakewell, but this temporary advantage was quickly neutralised by Geary again scoring for Everton. Play toned down for a considerable time, the heavy ground evidently telling on the players. Geary scored for Everton, and twenty minutes before time the game stood Everton 7 United 1, Geary scored all five goals in the second half. Final result Everton 10, Sheffield United 1.

BURNLEY V EVERTON PP
December 16, 1889.
This fixture should have been play at Burnley on Saturday, was abandoned owing to bad weather

EVERTON RESERVES 2 BLACKBURN ROVERS RESERVES 1
December 16, 1889.
The Liverpool Courier.
Owing to the thick fog, which covered the ground, it was decided to postpone the Lancashire Cup-tie, and a friendly match was played on the Everton ground, which was in a very bad condition for football. Everton had a strong team, one, which would have been quite able to take care of itself had it been decided to proceed with the tie. The following were the teams: - Blackburn Rovers; McOwen, goal, Southworth and Cheetham backs, Frost, Almond and Mercer half-backs, Waring, Aspin, Whittaker (B), Whittaker, and Whitehead, forwards, Everton Reserves: - Joliffe goal, Hammond and Sugg, backs, Farmer, Jones (R), and Weir half-backs, Deane, Walton, Waugh, Kirkwood and Abbott forwards. The Rovers kicked off, and for some time play was in the home half. Breaking away the Everton forwards headed by Kirkwood, took the leather right to the visitors' goal and shouts of “goal” were heard, the players being lost in the fog. When they came in slight it was found that Abbott had scored the point. The Visitors for a long time had to defend. B Whittaker seen issuing from the fog with the leather at his toes, and play was in the home quarters; after Aspin had tried to shoot F.Sugg relieved with a hugh kick. The fog, which was thick at the commencement now completely, hid the players, and it was unpossible to see twenty yards. The spectators, of whom there were a goodly number, had to find amusement at the expense of the referee and Umpires, who certainly presented a peculiar appearance, their dark clothes making than more conspicuous than the players, running up and down the field with apparently no object in view. Loud shouts of “goal” were again heard at the Blackburn End, and it was discovered that Kirkwood had obtained the second point. Half-time, arrived with the score Everton Reserves 2 goals, Blackburn Rovers Reserves nil.

After the interval Everton kicked off, and assumed the aggressive. The fog lifting a little, the spectators were enabled to see more of the players and the game. Shots were sent in by several of the home forwards, which McOwen kept out in good form, Farmer always a favorite with the Everton crowd was cheered for tricky play. Everton's left wing ran and passed in good style, and Waugh just missed heading a third point-a near thing. R.Jones next tried his hand, and sent in a grand long shot, which McOwen was only able to keep out at the expense of a corner. F.Sugg was cheered for neatly spoiling the visitors' forwards, Hammond is repeating the performance immediately after. Not to be denied, the Rovers gradually asserted themselves and Whittaker beat Joliffe for the first time, keeping up the pressure the Rovers gave Joliffe a lot to do but found him a hard nut to crack. Aspin made a magnificent run and had hard lines, his final shot striking the crossbar a long way out of Joliffe reach. Everton changed the venue and gave Cheetham and Southworth a chance of showing their speed. Hammond was called upon to stop a raid by the visitors' right wing, which he did in rather a shady manner. Final result Everton Reserves 2 goals, Blackburn Rovers Reserves 1.

PRESTON NORTH END 1 EVERTON 2 (Game 37)
December 23, 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
Since the occasion of North Enders carrying away the spoils of victory at Anfield some few weeks ago the belief that the “Proud Prestonians” would be defeated on their own ground has been retarded again and again by earnest and enthusiastic Evertonians. So emphatic was the defeat at Anfield and in such apparent easy fashion was it accomplished that many people who are not affected by prejudicial interest in any club delived themselves of the opinion that the return resolved itself only into a question as to how many goals the North Enders would win by. They considered that the conditions of the ground would have the chief influence on the score as, given one of those wet days which render the Preston ground like a miniature quagmire the Evertonians would again ignominiously vanquished; which, if the turf was in a good state, there would be every prospect of a fairly exciting game. The interest, which has been evinced in the contests, was clearly shown on Saturday when the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Company ran two special trains to Preston, both being well filled. The Everton men travelled to Preston accompanied by about 700 spectators and arrived at their destination at ten minutes past two, another trainload came in about a quarter of an hour later. The weather was beautiful, but the ground was not in the best condition, and was inclined to tell against the visitors. The Everton team was the same as advertised teams as follows; Preston North End: - Trainor, goal, Howarth and Ross (JN) (Captain), backs, Graham Kelso, and Russell, half-backs, Gordon, Ross (Jun), Thompson, Dewhurst, Drummond, forwards. Everton: - Smalley, goal, Hannah (Captain), and Doyle, backs, Parry, Holt, Cain half-backs, Latta, Brady, Geary, Chadwick, Milward, forwards. Referee Mr Jope. Thompson kicked off and midfield play ensued, the Evertonians at once commencing to slide about the thick muddy surface. The home men by the aid of Kelso worked right to the goalmouth, when Thompson failed to avail himself of a beautiful chance, Doyle then interposing and averting the danger. The visiting right wing broke away, but was soon pulled up by Ross and the Prestonians going away with a dash caused some apprehension on the part of the Liverpoolians spectators, but Thompson, with a beautiful short shot, struck the crossbar and there was a sigh of relief. From the centre of the field Geary claimed a hold on the ball and spirited away at tremendous high pressure, but just missed his aim while near to goal, although he had beaten Ross and Howarth. The North Enders again rattled away, and were again checked by Doyle who played a grand game. The Visitors moved off then and Chadwick shot very slightly wide of the upright. In the natural order of things, according to the procedure of the game, thus for Preston got to their opponents end again and Jimmy Ross and Gordon attempted to lower the Everton colours without success the two backs and Smalley putting in some good business. The Goalkeeper especially distinguished himself with one rescue. A magnificent move on the part of Latta and Brady resulted in the ball being taken to the opposite end, and a few seconds elapsed when Chadwick shot through, Milward in the meantime paying attention to Trainor. The referee would not allow the point on account of Milward having fouled the goalkeeper, the proud men established a position opposite to Smalley from whence Drummound essayed to score, the ball being got away by the visiting goalkeeper, who seemed, however, to be a slight distance behind the line when he proformed the feat. Up to this point it could scarcely be said that either team was playing superior to the other, at length the Evertonians took an advantage not far from Tainor. Geary had possession of the ball, and after dallying a few seconds, he passed to Chadwick who in turn handed it over towards Milward. This player, amidst a scene of breathless expectation, just managed to reach in time, and kick through a feat, which was vociferously applauded. The ball at this juncture had been in motion for half an hour, a minute after the kick off, Hannah had to vacate his position, owing to a kick on his leg. When the game was restarted Jimmy Ross had a splendid opportunity, when he stumbled over Parry, who had slipped down. A claim for a foul was made against Parry, but it was not allowed, then a fine long shot from Drummond went safe up to the arms of Smalley, score at Half-time: - Everton 1 goal, Preston North End nil.

Just before half-time, Hannah reappeared on the field, and was greeted with loud cheers. Immediately on the recommcement the Prestonians rushed away, and, all but escaped from scoring. They remained the upper hand for some minutes, and it appeared as if they were about to repeat exactly the same performance as at Anfield. The visitors however, were not entirely fagged, and pegged away at the ball with determination. Ross was penalised for fouling Geary, and for five minutes after Everton had it nearly all their own way. A corner proved fruitless and then a fine sequence of passes along the line of forwards in the jaws of the goal culminated in Milward beating Trainor. The point was not allowed, the referee ruling Milward off-side, Everton were now having nearly all the play, and Brady propelled a splendid shot, which Trainor did not very easily fist away. Now the home men twice reached their opponent's goal, and once had hard luck in failing to score. Latta was instrumental in removing the ball to the half-way line, when he passed over to Geary, who fairly flew along, passed all his opponents, and scored the second goal to the accompaniment of frantic cheering. North End after this reverse worked very hard and took the ball down, and Drummond shot the first goal for his side. Each end was rapidly visited in turn and both teams were playing a very hard game. Drummond, urged on by their cheers of the spectators executed a grand dribble and finished up by beating Smalley. The Preston spectators indulged in wild cheering somewhat prematurely as it happened, as the point was not permitted, Drummond being given off side. A highly exciting scrimmage took place, but it finished without accident, Latta striking the upright, the play was sustained in the homesters quarters. Final result Everton 2 goals Preston North End 1 goal.

EVERTON RESERVES 2 PRESTON NORTH END RESERVES 2
December 23, 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
This match was played on the Everton ground, which was a dreadful condition, the heavy rain having made it a perfect quagmire. The visitors were twenty minutes late, but on their arrival the teams quickly got to work before a scant audience. North End kick off and Kirkwood tried a run down the centre but found the ground too heavy to make any progess. He quickly made up for it by a grand pass to the right wing well taken by Abbott, who centred grandly, but Deane missed an easy chance of scoring. North End had a turn, and Joliffe had to thrown away several times in quick success. The North Enders goal had a narrow squeak, Porter missing a shot by Abbott, but the leather had not sufficient force to go through, the mud stopping it just inside. Several corners fell to the home team, but nothing-tangible accured, the Everton backs kicked strongly and prevented the visitors from stopping long in their half. Inglis tried a long shot and had hard lines the leather justed topping the bar. Waugh and Deane made a grand run up the left, and North End had to concede a corner, well placed and Waugh shot, but was wide. Everton had a slice of ill-luck Nidd sending the ball through his own goal, in a simple manner. A foul against Everton was given right in the goalmouth, and Demsey shot through the leather. Everton fully alive to their position, made a fierce attack on the visitor's fortress, but could not break through the defence Whittle saving well and preventing many of the shots from reaching Porter. Half-time arrived with the score North End 2 goals, Everton Reserves nil.

The ground, had at the commencement, was now totally unfit for football, being one mass of thick mud. Everton kicked off and Abbott quickly tried a shot, which was helped by Waugh and justed missed its mark- a near thing. Keeping up the attack, Waugh sent in a grand oblique shot, which completely beat Taylor amidst the enthusiastic cheers of the spectators. Everton were now having all the game and several warm scrimmages took place in the visitors goalmouth, and it was wonderful how the visitors kept the good shots out. At length the home right took the leather into the North End quarters, and passing to Kirkwood, that player equalised with afast shot. Everton were decidedly the better team on the heavy ground, and rarely let the leather come across the centre line. Runs by Waugh and Abbott were cheered, but nothing was done, with the exception of an abortive corner. Deane ran and passed to Kirkwood who, to the evident chagrin of the home supporters shot wide. North End broke away, and Lythgoe tested Joliffe who threw away in grand style. From now until the finish the game was more even. Inglis tried a long shooting, but it did not come off. Waugh tried hard to obtain the winning point, but Dempsey was his match, and prevented him from becoming dangerous. A foul against Preston North End was given in a dangerous position, but the visitors cleared. Final result:- Everton Reserves 2 goals, Preston North End Reserves 2 goals.

THE NORTH END PRESIDENT ON THE VICTORY
December 23, 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
The Everton men were very hospitably entertained at the conclusion of the match by the committee of their opponents' club. Mr.Sudoll, (Prsident of the North End) in proposing the health of the Everton Club, said he thought it was fairly entitled to the victory it had gained, that day. He was sorry to acknowledge it, but, neverthe less, as a true sportsman; he could not but admit that on the day's play the best team had certainly won.

EVERTON REVIEW
December 23, 1889.
The Liverpool Mercury
There must be special pleasure to Everton in the last victory, for it was gained against the same team as had beaten then so unexpectedly easy on Nov.16, since which date Everton have carried everything before them, in many cases with ridiculous easy, indeed, the defeat at Anfield has turned out another “blessing in disguise” and Everton have thence improved daily gaining confidence and more perfect combination, until they have so “not their house in order” as to rally out to Deepdale with no fear and trembling and turn victorious from a magnificent encounter by 2 goals to 1, with a trio of disputed points to boot. But to commence at the beginning of this good day's work, Everton travelled by the one o'clock train to Preston-exciting matters rather too fine this late departure-accompanied by 1,000 of their supporters full of assurance and determination to wipe out the previous disaster, and found North End ready and waiting. They were received with a cheer, Hannah won the toss, good omen, and Mr. Jope gave the signal for commencing. Thompson started, and the pace was a hot one, and remained so throughout. Play proceed on level terms until a quarter of an hour had pass away, when Chadwick forced Trainor to put through his own goal, but the point was vetoed, owing to Milward interfering with the custodian-a piece of play that deserved better success, but in another 15 minutes the Evertonians had their revenge, as Milward took a pass from Geary and Scored the only goal of the first half. Shortly after the slice of good fortune Everton experienced a second denial of a goal. A free kick came their way, which Doyle properly placed, and Geary sent the ball through, but before the ovation accorded by the Liverpoolians and others had subsided Mr.Jope had disallowed the point, contending that the ball had not been kicked from the right spot. The ball was replaced very near the original position, but Preston cleared this time. Everton were justly annoyed at this ruling, and wonder why Mr. Jope did not rectify the error the kick was taken and not after a goal had been kicked. Such actions bring odium on refereeing. Whilst these incidents were occurring, Everton were without their captain, Hannah, before Milward had scored, having with drawn through injury received in the leg from a suspicious kick by Drummond; but fortunately, the old Rentonians was able to return just before the interval. The speed during the second half, continued to be a cracker and the shooting excellent, both goalkeepers having little time for “speculating,” Trainor having most work to attend to, Milward was the first to find an opening, but, to the chagrin and dissatisfaction of Everton, was “refereed” offside. After Trainor had stalled off Latta, up went Geary in one of his unique gallops, and gave the famous Welsh custodian no chance with a lighting like shot, giving Everton a lead of 2 goals. Then came North End's turn Drummond scoring. In the subsequent play Everton had slightly the advantage, but the defences were both capable of preventing any successful raids on goal, and hence Everton retired victors of a grand game by 2 goals to 1. When the issue has been so satisfactory, we are almost content to let the result speak for itself but a personal reference to players is a necessity. Smalley was cool amidst all the excitement, and Hannah and Doyle were even more calm and were superior to J. N.Ross and Howarth. Doyle completely overplayed James Ross, who could seldom get near goal. Parry was more than a match for Gordon, and Holt and Cain were equally effective, and the half-back department has not been seen to greater advantage. The forwards individually and collectively performed splendidly. Latta played J.N.Ross to a standstill, and with Brady, came on for much cheering; Geary was at his best in running and shooting, and Chadwick and Milward were not far behind the right wingers. For the losers, Trainor and Howarth were the best behinds, Ross seldom thoroughly mastering Latta. The half-backs were strong, Graham strongest of the three. Gordon was all there with his screws, but J.Ross and Thomson always failed to take advantage of them; whilst Drummond was powerful and sometimes rough on the left. Mr. Sudell entertained the winners to tea, and said on the day's play the better team had won, and, sportsmanlike assured them he did not begrudge them the honours they wrested.

EVERTON 5 SOUTHPORT CENTRAL 0
December 26, 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
The Liverpool Senior Cup
The holiday matches commenced at Anfield yesterday afternoon, when Everton was opposed in the Liverpool Cup-tie by Southport Central, in the presence of fully 6,000 spectators. The ground was in a wretched state from the continued rain, although in the main a well-contested game was witnessed. Geary started the ball, and for a minute or so the play, was located at the Everton end, but after a corner had been secured and successfully cleared, a fine passing run by Latta and Brady took play in front of the Southport goal, which, after a vigorous assault surrendered during a “bully,” Milward making the final shot. Following the restart the play for a time was of a fairly even character, Smalley having use his hands on more than one occasion. At this time Lea and McLaren were prominent for Southport, and on a move again being made in the direction of the visitors goal, Milward and Kirkwood in turn sent in shots which were within an ace of taking effect. Gee, however, defended admirably and although the ball hovered threateningly in front, no impression could be made. Hodgkinson occasionally relieved well, but the Everton forwards were far too clever to admit of any serious inroads being made. Hammond, who occupied Doyle's place at full back also played a good game, his strategy near touch being so smart that he earned the well merited applause of the crowd. Just prior to the intervals a furious onslaught was made on the Southport goal, which, however, withstood the shock and ends were changed to the advantage of the homesters by a goal to nil. The “basket” having gone the round, Wilson restarted and an instant attack was inaugurated with the result that Milward beat Gee with a clinkling shot, which the custodian completely failed to reach. On restarting Latta contributed a sequence of exceedingly clever play, which brought about an attack that seriously jeopardize the visitors' goal. For a length of time a gallant defence was made, but eventually Geary got the ball at his toes, and with an electric shot Gee again surrendered his charge. For a time the play was of a desultory character, the proceedings eventually being enlivened by Holt taking a shot at goal from half-back, which sailed harmlessly over the bar after which Brady shot outside with his left, when the goal appeared to lie at his mercy. At length Wilson and McLaren momentarily located at the Everton end, only to find Smalley repel the attack with consummate easy and again the Central were placed upon the defensive. The visitors were now playing a very hard game, but they rarely, if ever, got within shooting distance of goal. Later on Latta sent in a long shot from the right, which struck the bar and passed over amidst disappointed cries of “Oh!.” A moment later however, Geary rushed up the centre and finished the quartette with a puzzling shot. The fog now settling down fast on the field of play, but again Geary got away from the centre at top speed and registered a fifth goal, the opposing backs being quite dazed by the celerity of the “medallists” movements. Shortly afterwards the game was brought to a close in favour of Everton by five goals to nil. Teams Everton: - Smalley goal, Hammond, and Hannah (Captain), backs, Doyle, Holt, and Kirkwood, half-backs, Milward, Waugh, Geary, Brady and Latta forwards. Southport Central: - Gee, goal, Dobson, and Hodgkinson, backs, Horton, AcKroyd, and Blinkhorn, half-backs, Lea, McLaren, Fecitt, Barton, and Wilson forwards.

BELFAST ATHLETIC MATCH CANCEL
December 26 1889.
The Liverpool Daily Post
Owing to the bad state of the ground and the match with Bootle and Everton in the afternoon, the Everton committee have decided to cancel the fixture with Belfast Athletic, which was advertised to be played at 10-15 this morning.

EVERTON 3 BOOTLE O
December 27, 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
For the first time during the present season the above mentioned clubs, met yesterday at Anfield, for the purpose of endeavoring to settle in a more decisive manner than in last season as to which of the two should be entitled to hold the disputed honour of “local champions.” Bigoted supporters of football football clubs, however, do not always accept the defeat of their “fancies” as conclusive, but often continue to think, especially when beaten by local rivals that their club suffered “hard luck” or had not a fair chance and so on. The Bootleites deserved all praise last season, as they won in one encounter with Everton, whilst the other two matches were declared drawn. Wonderful changes have occurred in the Anfield camp since then, and the form of the Evertonians shown thus far in the league contest has inspired their admirers, and impelled then to indulge in the hope of planning themselves with another great victor. Bootle have certainly not exhibited strength equal to that of their rivals, though a few weeks ago they performed a clever feat in winning nine consecutive matches including some excellent combinations. Odds against Everton winning the match were freely offered four or five weeks ago, but in the meantime the grand victories over Aston Villa and Preston North End have made these people chary in their inclinations to risk a little money on the event, and betting before the encounter veered considerably in favour of the Anfielders. For considerably more than an hour previous to the time advertised for the start of the match the people commenced to roll up to the scene of operations in large crowds, and when the teams appeared on the field there could scarily have been less than 18,000 spectators present. A veritable sea of faces and swaying bodies surrounded the boundaries, and it was without doubt a magnificent sight. The ground did not appear to be in a very good condition, and though some preparations had been made the turf remained very soft. At three minutes past two Geary kicked off for Everton down hill. Jamieson and Jones attempted to break away but the ball went over the touchline. From a pass, Chadwick received the ball, and a furious rush was made down the field Milward nearly shooting through, the goal being almost completely at his mercy. Then a scene of the wildest excitement followed, a determined scrimmage taking place a few feet of the Bootle custodian. Woods and McFarlane, however, stepped into the breach, and their aid was most providential, the ball being kicked over the line. Latta afterwards was well on his way towards the venue of his effects when Campbell cleverly robbed him, and Jamieson and Jones put in a dangerous movement. They finished by passing over to the right wing, from whence Kilner nearly met with success, Hannah only just beating him in time. It seemed, however, that all this labour was in vain, as a foul had taken place previously. Again the Bootle right wing threatening Smalley, but Doyle ventured in and rescued in and rescued the ball. The whole line of home forwards broke away, and a fine exhibition of passing on the part of the Everton men, and of defence by the Bootle backs, was witnessed about fifteen yards from the Bootle goalkeeper, the event concluding without mishaps. On two occasions the Bootle men towards close proximity to the Everton goal worked the leather, but fouls were given and the whole of that portion of the play neutralized. There was certainly nothing to chose between the teams up to this point. Everton at last commenced to press with earnestness of purpose, and from a splendid pass across the goalmouth by Chadwick, Wood deliberately fisted away. Of course a foul was given no breakdown occurring from it, though. Again there was an advance by the Everton forwards and Milward was to be commiserated for the non-success of a grand oblique shot. During this portion of the play it must be observed that Woods executed some splendid work, and saved his goal, time after time. A combined run towards the Everton end enlivened the game but again the backs were found invincible, Doyle Parry, and Holt appearing on the scene with great effect. Chadwick and Milward overcoming all obstacles, moved down to the left corner, and exciting passages again culminated without disaster though there were one or two near shaves. From the kick-off the ball was carried to the Bootle quarters and Milward was unfortunate in failing to reach the ball as it flew across the goalmouth from Latta's fist. At the period of the game the visitors could with difficulty holder their own, the ball despite all their efforts, remaining in their quarters. The leather was kept continually passing and repassing to Jardine but a loophole could not be found, Geary apparently scored with short fast, shot, but the referee Mr. Fitzroy Norris, did not consider it a valid point. This, as it happened, did not matter much, as Latta failing in a grand attempt, put forth further determined efforts, and with a truly magnificent long oblique shot he lowered his opponents colours admsts a wild and frantic outburst of yelling. Again Latta gained well-merited applause, by a tricky run, and ensuing this a most exciting battle ragged in front of the Bootle goal, the pull-up feeling of the crowd at last finding vent when it was seen that the ball had gone through. This was, however, changed to chagrin when the referee would not allow a goal. Woods and Galbraith menaced the Everton defence, and Parry offering determined opposition, came through with the globe, and gave it into the charge of Chadwick, Edgar at once saw an opportunity, and availed himself of it. He tricked McFarlance close to the half-way line, and rushing away at top speed there was nothing to stop him, and the grand movement concluded in the most fitting manner by a goal being scored, Chadwick coming in for the wildest cheering. Half-time result Everton 2 goals, Bootle nil.

From the restart the visitors encroached upon their opponents's half several times in succession, the ball not travelling within dangerous distance of Smalley though Doyle and Hannah relieving him of a great deal of responsibility. The Evertonians were becoming somewhat penned, and Latta was the only one who created any diversion in their favour his run however, being futile. Eventually the home right wing forced its way along and Kirkwood who was playing at half-backs in place of Cain, supported his forwards capital, with the result that Brady took a kick which Jardine managed to render null, not a moment to soon, as Milward was upon him as usual. A temporary incursion was made by the Bootle front rank, but Latta fastened on to the ball, and made another grand dribble over the half the field, McFarlane having to grant a corner, and from the coign of advantage, Chadwick banged the ball passed Jardine and scored the third goal. The Bootle men at this particular point were almost entirely demoralized, Jardine having to clear his lines twice, when it seemed almost certain that he would be beaten. Geary since the interval had been practically useless, as he was suffering from some injury to one of his legs and he was placed as outside left forward, Milward taking the central position. The game was discontinued for a few moments on account of Campbell being “winded.” The home men were now pressing all the time, and Chadwick had hard lines in one shot, striking the crossbar, and falling to Jardine was cleaned untaculously although Milward was again threatening him with a charge.Jardine was again called upon to discharge a very onerous duty, and in a marvelous manner he did so to perfection, with the opposing forwards surrounding him. A cheer greeted Kilner's performance in taking the ball over the half-way line, it having failed to get that far for about a quarter of an hour. Chadwick again had the misfortune to see an excellent shot merely pass outside the upright. Woods and Gailbraith careered down with the leather, but not much beyond the half-way line, as Doyle and Parry relieved. Chadwick received the ball and passed to Geary, who with difficulty succeed in turning and the ball was shot in, the other home forwards dashed up, but Frank Woods, spoiled their anticipations by getting through the whole lot with flying colours. The visitors were now appearing to a little better advantage, probably owing to the fact that Geary had retired from the field. Jimmy Woods got away with the globe at terrific pace, and it seemed as if some thing would occur in favour of the Bootleites, but Doyle finely dispossessed him of his charge, and play settled down in the usual quarters. The game was again stopped owing to Allisopp being hurt by Doyle's heavy charge. Final result, Everton 3 goals, Bootle nil. Teams, Everton: - Smalley goal, Hannah (Captain) and Doyle, half-backs Kirkwood Holt, and Parry, half-backs Latta, Brady, Geary, Chadwick and Milward forwards. Bootle: - Jatdine (J), goal, McFarlane and Wood (F), backs, Allison, Hughes, and Campbell (W), half-backs Wood (J), Galbraith, Kilner, Jamieson, and Jones forwards. Referee Fitzroy Norris.

BLACKBURN ROVERS 2 EVERTON 4 (Game 38)
December 30, 1889.
The Liverpool Courier.
This important League match was played on Saturday at Blackburn in dull and frosty weather, there beening about 12,000 spectators present. Great interest was centred in the match on accout of it bearing on the League championship, as it to a great extent determined the question as to which position the clubs engaged should fill. Everton were unfortunate in losing the services of Geary, who was hurt on Thursday last, Parry occupied his place, Kirkwood again playing at half-back on the left. The team otherwise was the same as usual, teams as Follows: Blacknurn Rovers: - Wilkie, goal, Brandon and Forbes, backs, Barton, Dewar, and Forrest, half-backs, Townley, Walton, Southworth, Campbell and Lofthouse forwards. Everton: - Smalley, goal, Hannah (Captain), and Doyle backs, Cain, Holt and Kirkwood half-back, Latta Brady, Parry, Chadwick, and Milward, forwards.

Over a thousand people travelloed by execursion from Liverpool to witness the match on a hard ground. The kick off was taken by Parry at half past two, and Everton at once took a foul, the ball was well worked down by Lofthouse and Campbell and a few critical moments were passed while the play was located in front of the Everton posts. Doyle removed the venue, and the scene of action was then transferred to the opposing end. Here it remained for a few minutes the home backs contending vigorously against the onslaught of their opponents. Brandon eventually brought succour to his men, and Lofthose and Campbell by pretty combination, caused apprehension on the part of the Liverpoolians spectators, until Doyle relieved finely. Further play was seen in front of the Rovers goal, but nothing of any moment occurred. Then the homesters went to their task with a will, and from a couple of fouls in proximity to the Everton goal, were within an ace of scoring. Townley sent in a grand shot, which Smalley splendidly fisted away, and then Lothouse missed a fine opportunity. The same players again spoiled himself, when right in front of Smalley, and then the visitors caused a diversion in their own favour. Parry and Milward compelling Wilkie to use his hands, there did not appear to be any choice between the teams, but the Evertonians seemed to suffer from the changes in their ranks so far cohesion was concerned. They kept the ball for some time in the Rovers territory, but failed in their endeavor to find a weak spot. Some grand fast work by Campbell and Lofthiuse resulted in the ball being well taken to the point they desired and another foul was given to then. This did not avail anything, but beyond a couple of runs by Latta the visitors did not make any headway. The Rovers were moving in grand style, and their defence was perfect but the shooting was erractic. The Rovers line was at last broken through and Latta and Brady cantered down in pretty style, Forbes to kick into touch. The visitors did not gain any advantage from this, as lofthouse and Campbell again dropped on the ball, and Townley missed a soft thing. Milward and Chadwick took the ball along, and forced Brandon to concede a corner. From this Holt nearly headed through, the ball, however, striking the upright, and rebounding into play, from whence Brady scored the first goal, thirty-five minutes from the start. Following this there was a fierce conflict in the Rovers goalmouth, and it was lucky for the Homesters that there was not another downfall. The visitors success made then move with greater spiri, and several aims were made at Wilkie, none of them, however being sufficiently accurate. Half-time Result, Everton 1 goal Rovers nil.

Midfield play followed the luck off, until Parry, who had gone to right half-backs gave the ball to Brady, Latta mainly being responsible for the retention of the ball in close proximity to Wilkie. A great improvement was noticeable in the combination of the Evertonians and they could not be removed from their position in the goalmouth. At length a lop hole was discovered, and the whole line of forwards travelled in beautiful style right down the field Campbell finishing up by defeating Smalley. From a pass by Townsley the Rovers now became somewhat more alert, and the right wing sprinted along gave an opening to Barton who shot over the bar with a long kick. A pass being sent from the right wing again it looked as if Townley and Walton would put a second goal, but Parry was all there, and saved finely. The home men were now paying their antagonists back in their own club and their brilliant passing near to goal was clever, Smalley had to save a shot from Topwnsley, which seemed likely to draw blood, and how he did this he himself only knowns. A breach was then made in the ranks of the Rovers and Latta rushing down passed the ball across the goalmouth, Milward getting up in time to dash both the ball and the goalkeeper through at the same time. After a momentary incursion by the Rovers the visiting forwards went down by means of grand passing, and Chadwick sent in a hot shot, which Wilkie marvelously saved. Kirkwood at once returned the ball, and Latta charged the goalkeeper, the ball again fisted away. The Evertonians claimed a goal, alleging that Wilkie was over the line when he returned the ball, and the referee allowed the claim amidst defeating cheers from the Evertonians supporters. Again Latta and Brady were seen bravely rattling along, and Kirkwood shot over from their pass. A corner fell to Everton though the exertions of the right wing, nothing came of this, and the Rovers forwards getting along scored Southworth beating Smalley, who scened unprepared. A couple of minutes elspsed when Everton scored their fourth goal through the agency of Milward. The Rovers were striving hard to retrieve the fortunes of the day and the whole lot worked their best, with the result that an exciting scrimmage occurred in front of Smalley. The ultimate conclusion being in the balance for a short period and then Holt stepped in and headed away. Again and again, did the Rovers struggle down, and they several times, looked as that could not help, but score, but Smalley and the backs wood not be beaten. Result Everton 4 golas Blackburn Rovers 2 goals.

EVERTON RESERVES 0 BLACKBURN ROVERS RESERVES 0
December 10, 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
Lancashire Senior Cup
This match played on the Everton ground, before a scanty attendance. Everton kicked off, and the game at once became very fast, the ground, although hard being in excellent condition for football. Warner and Waugh made pretty runs the former, owing to Nidd missing his kick, but nearly effecting the downfall of the home fortress, Southworth had a stiff tussle with the home right wing. Weir evidently suited by the hard ground, was in grand form, and effectually checked Whittaker time after time. Waugh disappointed his admirers by shooting wide, when in easy distance. Abbott very soon followed suit. A warm scrimmage took place in front of the visitors' goal but nothing came of it, and the Rovers from rank, broke away in fine style, Farmer eventually clearing in good style. Abbott was cheered for grand centre, but his colleagues did not take advantage of his good play. Again tried a long shot, which was well kept out by Joliffe. A corner fell to the Rovers, but nothing tangible was scored, the referee at this point did not please, the spectators by his decision. A grand run by the Rovers shaped dangerous until Hammond just checked in time, Waring shot high, over the bar. Southworth showed his great speed on several occasions. The Rovers was now having the best of it, but could not break through the home defence. Everton at length broke away, and Waugh again missed his mark. The homesters now pressed, but found the defence inpregable, Joliffe was cheered for gaving several grand shots in quick success, and but for his grand defence the visitors' must have scored. Half-time arrived without either team having scored.

After the interval, the Rovers quickly assuned the aggressive and rained shots which, unfortunately for them were yards wide of their mark. Nidd who had been in good form, made a mistake which nearly.proved fatal, but Hammond just saved a grand shot, which was out of the reach of Joliffe, Mr.Mitchell. the Rovers empire was hooted at, for claiming what the crowd considered unfairly. Carter was cheered for saving, and play settled down in the visitors' half. Mercer who was facing Waugh, proving a stumbling block on many occasions, and showed that Waugh was not the Davie “of old.”

The homesters although pressing, did not show a remarkable combination, and got within shooting distance. Hammond checked a raid by the visitors, front rank in a remarkable manner, news of the big match at Blackburn now reached the ground, and when it was known Everton had scored, and the Rovers had not, a remarkable scene of enthusiasm took place the crowd cheering in a victorious manner. The Evertonians continued to press, and began to shape better in front of goal, the visitors having to concede several corners. Nidd and the Rovers right wing, had a tussle, which ended in Nidd sending the leather down the field with a hugh kick. The Rovers now had a turn but found the home defence very strong, Waugh tried several long shots, but was wide each time. Time arrived with the result a draw, no goals being scored.

EVERTON REVIEW
December 30, 1889.
The Liverpool Mercury
Everton are again to be congratulated, their great victory over the Blackburn Rovers on Saturday is one which can only be hailed with joy in the Liverpool camp and will cause astonishment to the outside football world. The contest was not only to decide the superiority of the individual clubs, but also to prove which would ultimately be the champions of the League. Both sides have in their recent engagements come out with flying colours the Rovers winning no fewer than three League matches during the past week, while on the other hand, Everton have had their share of work during the last eight days by overthrowing both the English and the local cup holders. Feeling ran very high in the respective circles and no fewer than 13,000 spectators lined the ropes at Leamington, included in which were about 1,500 excursionists, who had journeyed forth to Blackburn to cheer their pets to victory as they had done the previous Saturday at Preston. On the stand could be seen many well-known football celebrities, the Rovers executives were fortunately able to put their best on the field, while the same cannot be said for Everton, who were without their popular centre forward, owing to an accident to his knee received in the Bootle match. No doubt had Geary been playing, he would have treated the Blackburn folks to some of his famous sprints, as the ground, being dry, would have been to his liking. Everton lost the toss and Parry set the ball in motion to a game, which was throughout a pleasant and scientific one. The first half opened fast, and Everton commenced, the attack from a free kick, but the sterling defence of the Rovers stemmed the dangerous rushes of the visitors' respective wings, and 40 minutes had elapsed before Brady found an opening by putting one outside the reach of Wilkie. Although exchanges were frequent no further scoring took place to the interval, Parry now went to his proper place at half-back, and Kirkwood improved the combination of the team by going centre forward, a position, which he fillked alike creditably to his club and himself. The second half again saw Everton attacking, their quickness on the ball being greatly admired. Although acting on the defensive for some time, the Rovers luckily got away, and a scrimmage in goalmouth took place, Southworth raising the hopes of the Blackburnites by rushing one past Smalley, and drawing level, amidst loud and prolonged cheering, which had hardly sudsided before Everton warmed up and again led through a grand effort by Milward. The Rovers made vain endeavours to break through, but found the defence of Everton imenetrable, and soon Latta, after cutting down all opposition, banged through a third from a repass by Brady. Just on the back of this success Latta was grounded and the free kick was the means of Walton scoring a second for his side. Although Everton had nearly all the play to the finish they could only score once more, which was done by Chadwick, and Everton retired victors with a substantial win of 4 goals to 2. For the losers Wilkies in goal saved many good shots, but did not seemed to please the supporters of the club; whilst Forbes and Brandon although striving hard were no match for the capabilities of the visitors' front rank. Forrest and Dewar were the pick of the halves, the forwards at tomes combined prettily, but seldom if ever got the upperhand of the visiting defence. The winners although handicapped, played the game to a man, and showed their supporters that they have a few equals. Smalley in goal, displayed some of his abilities, but had little to do. The backs and half-backs did all that was required of them, and fed their forwards judiciously, Latta and Brady were too good for their opponents, while the same remark applieds to Chadwick and Milward. Kirkwood shaped well, all things taken into consideration.

EVERTON 3 LONDON CASUALS 2
December 31, 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
The return fixture between these clubs was played at Anfield yesterday, in a fine football weather, there being about 4,000 spectators present. It will be remembered that at Leyton some weeks ago the Liverpool team defeated the Casuals by seven goals to two. The home team yesterday underwent a number of alterations, and it was composed as follows, Everton: - Joliffe, goal, Hannah (Captain), and Doyle, backs, Kirkwood, Holt, and Parry, half-backs, Waugh, Chadwick, McArthur, Brady, and Latta, forwards. It will be seen that a new man from Oban was playing at centre forward. Casuals team: -Seton (WJ) goal, Fry (CD), and Nelson (JL), backs, Topham (AG), Mitchell (EDJ), and Cross (JK), half-backs, Woodbridge, Nixon (AC), Topham (R), Walters (HM), and Sandilands (RR), forwards. Owing to the late arrival of the visitors it was nearly half an hour beyond the advertised time when Everton started the ball, and the home right having manoeured for a while the Casuals took possession, and racing down the field an abortive shot was made at goal. From the kick-out Brady and Latta speedily fastened on the ball and after tricking about on the right to the great amusement of the crowd Latta passed over and Parry shot outside. Now for a length of time the Casuals were penned within their own half, until Walters and R Topham worked their way down, and Walters and Nixon each sent in weak shots, the last one going over the bar. Latta and Brady would not permit the ball to remain in their half, and talking the ball up, the first mentioned centred splendidly, but there was no one on the alert to make use of the advantage. McArthur had a try with an excellent low shot, the ball, however, going outside, and then the visiting left wing again made tracks to their opponents goal, but could not long retain their position. The right wing was again in the front with a rush, and Latta after running finely screwed in after it had crossed the line, and thus Everton drew first blood. A corner was afterwards given to the homesters, but nothing came of this, and then the Casuals left wing rattled along and gained some benefit from Cain fouling Sandilands. The ball was taken well down to the Everton goalmouth, and here Walters missed a grand opportunity from a pass by Topham. The home forwards combining in good style carried the ball to their opponent's citadel, and a regular battery was opened up by the Evertonians, Chadwick at length beating Seton who was knocked over by the wall. A few moments after the kick off Walters took possession of the ball, and racing away at a grand speed he walked round Doyle, beat Joliffe, laud applause being awarded to the brother of the famous backs, for his clever feat. The homesters were having all the play now and from a free kick given to Everton in the goalmouth Doyle scored the third goal, the ball touching one of the Casuals before it went through. Holt was next cheered for some tricky play, Walters again distinguished himself by excellent play, but the backs proved too good for him. After some further attacking on the part on the home team, in which Latta was especially prominent with some good shots, the visitors moved down, and Nixon with a fine attempt compelled Joliffe to make a fine save whilst on his knees and concede a corner. This was not turned to better account, but Woodbridge had a fine swift shot, which just passed over the bar. Everton were attacking at half-time when the score stood: - Everton 3 goals, Casuals 1 goal. The Casuals towards the latter half were exhibiting improved combinations, and the home men seemed included to hold them somewhat too cheaply. For some time after the restart they had a little more of the game than their opponents, and could with difficulty be kept away by Doyle and Cain. On one occasion Nixon beat Doyle and gave the ball to Woodbridge, from whose pass R.Topham should certainly have scored. Latta put in a grand run from midfield passed all before him, even to the goakeeper, who rushed out to meet the ball, but even than he could not score, as A.G.Topham careered down in time to make a most providential save. From this and for some time after the some team made all the running, though they could not beat the goalkeeper. Waugh and Chadwick executed a nice dribble from the half way line, and the last-mentioned passed swiftly across the sticks, Latta being just too late in endeavoring to reach the ball. The Casuals by dint of hard labour managed to place themselves in a good position, but despite every opportunity being given them they could not defeat Joliffe. The Casuals pressed for some time, and should have scored from a corner kick. They atoned for this a few minutes later, when Joliffe mildly stood still and watched the ball slowly pass between his head and the crossbar a very soft goal indeed. Everton rushed down several times without success, and then the visitors went up in gallant array and obtained a couple of corners, neither of which proved of use to them. Waugh and Chadwick got away, and a capital shot was well cleared by Seton, who throughout had sustained his charge beyond reproached. Final result Everton 3 goals, Casuals 2 golas.

EVERTON FOOTBALL IN SCOTLAND
December 31 188.
The Liverpool Courier
An Everton team will play the return game against Celtic, at Glasgow to-morrow, but of course this arrangement will not interfere with the home programme, and Everton will play Battlefield at Anfield enclosure as announced. The teams for Glasgow will leave by the 3 p.m. train from lime-street station to-day.