November 1889

EVERTON 8 STOKE 0 (Game 32)
November 4 1889. The Liverpool Courier
To witness this tenth league encounter for the Everton team there were a large number of Spectators at Anfield. The Everton team underwent a couple of important alterations. Cain taking Farmers place at right half back. Brady made his first appearance since his suspension, and displaced Kirkwood as inside right. The remainder of the team was without change. The men from the Black County did not arrive until half an hour after the time appointed for the kick off, and the teams were composed as follows; Everton: - Smalley goal Hannah (Captain) and Doyle, backs, Parry, Holt, and Cains, half-backs, Latta Brady, Geary, Chadwick, and Milward forwards. Stoke: - Rowley, goals, Clare and Underwood, backs, Montford, Hendry and Smith, half-backs, McCormick, Gee, Baker, Ramsey, and Cooper forwardes. The visitors kicked off down hill, and after exchanges Everton forced the play. Latta made a nice tricky run and passed to Geary, who sent in a beautiful low shot along which missed the mark only by a few inches. Milward almost rushing the ball through, the homesters retained their position, and Latta made as good an attempt as Geary had done previously. Following this Brady received the ball from the wing companion, and kicked a goal when the game at this point being ten minutes old. The Evertonians attack was very strong, and shots from Geary, Chadwick, and Brady were unfortunately unsuccessful. Another admirable effort on the right wing terminated in a manner desired, Rowley being unable to prevent Latta shot from going through. Milward next distinguished himself by a speedy run and pretty play, a beautifully pass to Brady justmerely failing. Immediately afterwards Geary headed the globe over to Latta who scored the third goal. The Stoke boys at last forced their way into their opponents' quarters but it was only a transient visit, the home forwards making their way up again. Geary then brilliant placed the ball past Rowley, the point however, not being allowed. Owing to offside play. The visiting team looked dangerous on two occasions, through the exertions of the right wing, but Doyle stuck to his post manfully, and removed the play in a creditable manner. The Evertonians compelled their antagonists to concede a corner and Chadwick, taking the kick put the ball right into the goalmouth, Geary heading the fourth goal. The combination of the Anfield organization was something out of the usual order of things, and the improvement upon the play of the previous Saturday was remarkable. Shots after shots was put in, and the visiting custodian experienced a warm time. Milward and Chadwick gave Rowley a near shave, and Brady also offered him a handful. The staffordshire team now exhibited better movements, but did not succeed in giving Smalley any work to do, his position up to the period having being surecure. The Everton men again relief and two further corners were accept. Nothing having come of those, Brady got on the ball, and scored a fifth point, the ball striking the crossbar, and rendering it nearly impossible for Rowley to stop it. A few seconds later a slight scrimmage took place in front of the visiting goalkeepers, the result of which was that Milward added another notch, thus making the total to six goals to Stoke nil. The visitors played up with more dash, Baker and Ramsey being prominent, but a shot from the former was too wide of the upright. Half-time result; Everton 6 goals Stoke 0.

On the resumption of the game Brady rushed away, and passed over to Latta, who exchanged with Milward, this player striking the upright with a fast shot. The play of the home forwards diminished somewhat, and the Stoke left taking the ball well up compelled Doyle to kick behind, the corner kick, however, being fruitless. Geary kicked a second off-side goal, but the Evertonians made amends for this by obtaining a tangible point almost immediately afterwards, Geary again being the means of doing this by a pass from Brady. Rowley then received hearty applause for a marvellous save, from Milward, and following this McCornick put in a grand run which did not attain the end so much desired. Notwithstanding the heavy score against the, the Stoke lads played up pluckily and showed much more finish than in the first half. The vistors were now fairly holding their own, and the backs tackling and kicking finely, assisted in keeping the ball well in the Everton territory. Darkness coming on now it was somewhat difficult to see the ball. Final result Everton 8 goals Stoke 0.

EVERTON REVIEW
November 4 1889.
The Liverpool Mercury
Everton beat Stoke in gallant style on Saturday, and are now in great joy, for the Wolverhampton Wanderers, were discomfited at Perry Barr, and Everton resume the lead of the Leaguers. Special interest centred in the match or account of Brady's reappearance, and in the debut of Cain at half-back in a league contest in place of Farmer, who is at present serving a couple of week's suspension. Stoke arrived late, and kept the home players waiting fully half an hour. In the meantime curiosity on the new men, who were both received with an ovation by the 10,000 spectators. The ground was on the heavy side, and a good deal of wind was manifest, though it did seem to inconvenience the player as much. Winning the toss, Everton had the hill against them, but they made little of this impediment, and at once grouped themselves round about Rowley, good shots by Geary, and Latta being no avail with such a custodian in goal. Doyle next cut McCormack up short when running powerfully and then began the fun. Latta and Brady went up in a pretty passing movement, and the latter at length finding himself, within range sent the ball at a terrific speed, and scored a real gem of a goal. This, of course'brought down the house and made Brady a hero before the game was ten minutes old. Fairly nonplusing the Stoke backs by their well concerted passes, Everton returned to the attack, and were not long before they again baffled the active and watchful Rowley, Latta this time shooting through, a performance he early on repeated. Everton continued masters of the situation, Stoke only occasionally getting away for short spurts. Geary, Brady, and Milward followed with goals, the total at half-time being a good half-dozen. Play afterwards was less spirited, but it went consistently in favour of Everton, who finally won by 8 goals to nil. A defeat which must have brought recollections to Stoke of that 10 goal mishap at Deepdale. Now for a word or two about the actors in this glorious rout. Smalley had next to nothing to do, but the little bit of business he had attended to was sufficient to show that he could if called upon maintain the great form evident throughout the season. Doyle had the strongest wing to combat with, and was very reliable whilst Hannah did his share of hard work in a polished and clever way, Holt Parry, and Cain made a strong trio at half-back. This department was of a very different character from that of the two previous weeks, and to their effectiveness is due in a great measure the heaviness of Stoke's defeat. Cain had to face McCormack, as international man, and a sprinter to boot and foiled his man in a most competent manner, making a judicious use of his weight, and feeding his forwards well. The general verdict is that Cain will do and will permanently establish his claim to Farmer's position. The forwards all played nicely together, bent on winning, but Latta and Brady whose shooting was of the electrifying order, made the most friends, and worked with such thorough understanding as to place the right in advance of the left wing though Chadwick and Milward contributed much solid help. Geary showed great improvement and was at times brilliant, notwithstanding that the ground was not quite to his liking. In short the downright good shooting and passing of the home forwards beat Stoke. Rowley was in his usual form, but was fairly staggered with the incisiveness of the shots. Clare and Underwood could seldom cope with the invaders. Hendry and Smith were at times smart in tackling and of a fairly good lot of forwards McCornack and Gee on the right were the best and the most dangerous. Everton have a lot of business on hand just now. To-day they visit Burnley and on Wednesday play the cup tie with Witton at Anfield the Lancashire Exeutive having granted an extention of time rather than santions a walk over for Witton.

BURNLEY 1 EVERTON 3
November 5 1889.
The Liverpool Mercury
The postponed match between these clubs was played at Burnley yesterday and after a good game, the result in favour of Everton by 3 goals to 1.

EVERTON 6 WITTON 0
November 7 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
Lancashire cup tie (3 rd Round)
This match was played to-day, on the Anfield road enclosure, in beautiful weather there being nearly 4,000 spectators present. The composition of the home team was the same as in last Saturday match, the teams as followers; Everton: - Smalley, goal, Hannah (Captain), and Doyle, backs, Parry Holt and Cain, half-backs, Latta, Brady, Geary, Chadwick, and Milward forwards. Witton: - Forrest, goal Tattersall, and Frankland, backs, Whiteside, Isherwood, and Flecher, half-backs, Dimmock, Shorrocks, Smith Turner, and Grimeshaw, forwards . The start was made 20 minutes late when Everton took the kick-off with the slope in their favour and the sun shining in their eyes. A little midfield play having taken place, Geary put in a couple of attempts at lowering the Witton colours, the first shot going over the bar and the other passing outside. Some neat play occurred on the home left wing, when Chadwick made a nice effort, which Forest rendered null, Latta heading past the upright. A foul in front of the Witton goal ensued, and Doyle taking the kick placed the ball between the sticks, no point accruing on account of the leather not having been touched. The visiting right wing then carried the ball up, and Smalley finely saved a couple of good efforts to break through his charge. Brady next, after a nice run by Latta, merely failed to score with a pretty kick and then the East Lancashire boys made a determinant onslaught on their opponents defence, the ball being several times cleverly cleared by Smalley. A couple of corners to the credit of the visitors rapidly followed, but both were unproductive the danger being eventually removed by a kick over the line. Milward had a fairly good opportunity but he shot over the bar, and in unsuccessful corner followed soon afterwards. The Everrtonians opened a fusillade on their antagonists goal, all the forwards trying to get through though without effect. The play for some little time was unattractive, until a grand passing movement amongst the Everton forwards assumed a threatening aspect, when Isherwood finely averted the danger and enabled his forwards to again move up the field, where they gave Smalley a further handful. The home team again made tracks for the other end, and Cain took a good long kick, which was not far from its mark, the goalkeeper in endeavoring to avert his downfall granting a corner. The attack of the homesters was now hard to resist, shot after shot being sent in, and corners obtained though without avail. The pressure was sustained, Geary being responsible for a pretty and low kick which almost beat Forrest, whilst Latta was unfortunate in a further try at goal. The Evertonians continued to hold the advantage with no better result, Forrest retaining his charge intact by some undoubtedly clever labour. An exciting scrimmage having taken place in front of the Witton posts half-time arrived without a point having been scored on either side. After the interval Everton ran up the field and Latta tamely kicked over the bar when but a few yards to the left of the goalkeeper. The Witton right wing, gaining possession raced away, and Alston kicked the ball magnificently from the touchline, Smalley only just being able to prevent it from going though. The Witton goal then had many narrow escape, Forrest having to put in all he knew. At length the homesters were awarded for their exertions by seeing the ball pass the goalkeeper from Latta's foot. This success was repeated, but a few minutes later by the same player Forrest not being able to reach the ball; and the Evertonians thus took the lead by two to nil. Holt neatly tricked his opposing wing, and gave the ball to Geary, who passed it over to Latta and this player handing over to Brady a resting-place was found behind the goal. There was but a short interval, when Chadwick imitated Brady's performace with an admirable long shot just over Forrest head. A corner fell to the lot of the home men, and the sphere being well placed in the goalmouth Geary headed it through and increasing the score to five goals in the homesters favour. Latta, Brady, and Cain were very unfortunate in several excellent attempts, but the shooting showed remarkable improvement on that of the preceding half. The Evertonians sustained the pressure the forwards combining well, whilst on the other hand the visitors up to this point had scarcely ever invaded their antagonists' half. On two occasions the “champions of the League” appeared as if they would score from a scrimmage' but the hopes of the spectators were not realised. Just before time however, Latta again got the ball at his toes, and shooting across Forrest was beaten for the sixth time. Shortly after which the game was brought to a close. Final result Everton six goals Witton nil.

STOKE 1 EVERTON 2 (Game 33)
November 11 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
The return League match between these clubs was played at Stoke on Saturday, in dull weather, there being about 3,000 spectators present. Everton played the team which was victorious over Stoke and Witton teams as follows: - Everton: - Smalley, goal, Hannah (Captain), and Doyle, Parry, Holt, Cain, half-backs, Latta Brady, Geary, Chadwick, and Milward. Forwards. Stoke: - Rowley goal, Mountford, and Underwood, backs, Ramsey, Christie, McCronack, Gee, Coupar, Baher, and McCreddie forwards. Referee Fitzroy Norris . Stoke took the kick off, at ten minutes past three, and some play in midfield ensued. Doyle put in a grand kick, which gave Brady an opportunity of shinning, he passed to Latta, and this player centred nicely in to the goalmouth, Geary heading over the bar. The wings of the visiting team played in capital order, and Parry and Holt supporting them well gave the backs considerable apprehension but notwithstanding this no vulnerable spot was discovered. A capital piece of combination on the left wing of the Evertonians brought the ball down on the opposing goal, where Latta getting hold gave Rowley some work which was executed in the goalkeepers usually neat style. A corner kick was obtained and taken by Parry the advantage however, being neutralized by Brady shooting wildly. The Stoke men at last forced their way down, McCornack making a tide good run, but Doyle came to the relief. Then Milward managed to sprint along equally as well as his opponents, and when near goal he passed the ball cleverly to Chadwick, who made a clever, endeavour to score but just failed. The home team being somewhat stronger than when they met their antagonists at Anfield, were playing a much better game, but could not on any occasion breaking away. A good movement amongst the Everton forwards nearly concluded in a goal, Latta putting in a regular teaser and Rowley to save his charge having to fist behind. The Stoke right wing at length dashed splendidly down, but nothing tangible came of them. A corner kick, which was gained on one occasion being wretchedly played towards the Stoke goal. McCornick again sprinted grandly and shot in, Smalley could not hold the ball and consequently a goal was scored. The home men now played up with great spirit, and the forwards again menaced the Everton goal, when Christie received a strain and had to be carried off the field. With their opponents thus weakened the Evertonians put a better complexion on their play and Brady almost lowered the Stoke colours. The Stoke men, however, held more than their own and Smalley was once only just able to relieve himself of the ball when three men were upon him. The ball was carried to the opposite end, and Milward ought to have scored but he passed over to Geary, and that player kicked wide. Half-time Everton nil; Stoke one goal.

On resuming play, the visitors made good headway, but could not for a few minutes and a loophole. Then the ball was passed to Milward, who was standing well towards the goal, and he shot in, Latta rushing up just in time to complete the effort and equalise the score. The game at this point was discontinued for a couple of minutes on account of an injury to Geary, which fortunately did not necessitate his removal from the field. Coupar carried the ball down the field and nearly scored with a fine kick, and a few minutes later McReddie followed his companion's example with a chucking run, and Doyle through a miskick conceded a corner. This was also of a futile character, but the Staffordshire boys continued their attacks and it was with some difficulty they were kept out. At length Latta was the hero of a grand run, and a scrimmage in front of goal ensuing it was by more chance that the sphere was cleared. The homesters, despite the fact that they were minus one of their team, were playing a remarkably good game, and were if there was anything in it, having the best of the game. Milward now played at centre-forward, Geary taking his position as outside left, and the last mentioned player was credited with a magnificent fast run along the line passing all his opponents and forcing Rowley to desert his post in order to remove the ball. For some reason Geary, and Milward reverted to their ordinary position a few minutes afterwards, and great pressure was exercised on the Stoke goal for some time with no better luck. Eventually Latta and Brady worked the globe down and passed over to Milward who kicked the ball in, Geary making doubly certain of it. Nettled by the reverse, the home men fought the battle with vigour, Doyle, however, proving a great thorn in their side. Milward again forced his way along and kicked to Geary, who sent the ball in so neatly that Rowley had to lie down in order to prevent it from going through. Everton at this point pressed all the time and could not be removed from the Stoke half. Final result Everton 2 goals Stoke 1 goal.

EVERTON RESERVES 6 BURNLEY RESERVES 0
November 11 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
This match was played on the Anfield-road enclosure before about 2,000 spectators, in dull weather. The Burnley team were late, and it was about 3-40 when Binns kicked off for Burnley. The opening exchanges were all in favour of Everton, who quickly tested McConnrell but found him all there. Everton made several attempts to open the scoring account, but could not break through, and Burnley had a turn their attacks sharing the same fate. Hibbert and Ducksworth put in good work, and from a pass Binns just missed his mark. Everton retaliated, and “Billy” Orr put the final touch on, and beat McConnell somewhat easily. Burnley had several chances, but could not shoot accurately their shots being very wide. The Burnley right wing was cheered for pretty passing, their efforts resulting in a corner, which was abortive. Binns caused laughter by claiming a goal where the ball was at least two yards wide, of course the claim was not entertained. Play continued fairly even, Burnley right wing and the home left putting in good work. Crabtree put in a grand run, but could not break through the home defence. Hammond effectually meeting his attack, Orr had hard lines with a grand shot, which McConnell kept out. Half-time arrived with the score Everton Reserves 1 goal, Burnley Reserves nil.

Burnley started with great dash, and after a fierce struggle in the home half Everton took up the attack, McConnell being called upon to use his hands. He could not clear, however, and Walton shot the ball past him for the second time. Everton were now having all the game and pressed their opponents hard, Walton again beating the Visitors custodian with a grand shot. Hardly had the cheers died away when Walton obtained a third goal, and made the score four to nil. Hammond was cheered for grand defence, robbing three of his opponents at a most dangerous time, and took the play into home territory and had hard lines, a grand shot striking the bar. Everton retaliated with better result, Abbott obtaining the fifth goal in rather an easy manner. It was now very dark and impossible to distinguish the players across the field, but Everton attacked fiercely, scoring the sixth goal amidst the cheers of the spectators. Final Result; Everton Reserves 6, Burnley Reserves nil.

EVERTON REVIEW
November 11 1889.
The Liverpool Mercury
Everton emerged from a hard week's work with flying colours. First Burnley were overthrown at Turf Moor on Monday by 3 goals to 1, then Witton at Anfield on Wednesday by 6 goals to 0, and to maintain the harmony, Stoke on Saturday again vanquished only with considerably more difficulty at home then when abroad, and Evertonians are reasonably happy. The return match at Stoke turned out to be a very different affair as it was generally expected to be than that of the previous week for the Potters invariably show up well upon their “native heath.” Still Everton managed to win by 2 goals to 1, which is an advance on the drawn game of last year. The visitors put the same team in the field as on Previous Saturday, whilst the home club made three changes the two prinicipal being Christie (half-backs), and McReddie (forward) vice Clare and Smith. A drizzling rain made the ground soft, and footing uncertain but Everton opened, with a good rush, and gave Rowley plenty of work, which he disposed of in his most skilful vein. The next incident was in Brady getting hurt, but he stood gamely to his guns, and Everton maintained a steady pressure though none of the forwards seemed to be in the humour for brilliant shooting just now. Stoke when they got away were more fortunate, as McCornick shot from a long range, and claimed successfully for a goal though Smalley, failing with the ball, he was fully a yard clear of the posts. Shortly afterwards a slice of bad luck befell Stoke as Chrristie twisted his leg, and was compelled to retire from the game. Everton aroused themselves on charging ends, but it was not until a lot of neat forwards play had menaced goal that Latta could secure an equalising point. Subsequently though Geary received a kick and then joined Chadwick on the wing. Stoke were thrown more or less on the defensive, the Nottingham man scoring the winning goal shortly before the finish of moderate game. The losers played much better than when in Liverpool especially in the defensive department, Mountford being very troublesome to pass. The halves all did well, and McReddie divided the praise for forward play with McCornick and Coupar. Smalley had very little to do, the backs and half-backs being too effective to permit of many encroachment on his preserve, Holt the more brilliant of them all. The forwards combined well in unselfish tactics but were not at their best owing either to the slippery state of the ground of the amount of hard work they have been called upon to do recently. Everton, by the by, have now reached the half-way milestone having won 6, lost 2, and drawn 3 of the eleven matches played, against 6 won, 4 lost, and 1 drawn at the corresponding stage last season.

THE EVERTON CAPTAIN.
November 16, 1889.
The Liverpool Football Echo.
AN INTERVIEW WITH HANNAH- HOW FOOTBALL IS PLAYED.
Andrew Hannah, unlike other distinguished footballists, was easily accessible to your “special.” Through the courtesy of the hon, secretary of the Everton Football Clue (Mr. R. Molyneux) I was introduced tom Hannah, and from the same gentleman I received an invitation witnessed to-day's great –probably taking things for all in all, the most important that has ever been arranged between the Olympians of English football. “Greek will meet Greek” to-day, and may I be there to see. Hannah at the moment may be regarded, from his position, as the Champion Footballist of Great Britain, I'll tell you why. He is the chief- the captain of the Everton, which has lowered the colours of the greatest clubs in Scotland, the birthplace and the nursery of this great and popular game, and which is at the present moment a point or two ahead in all the League matches of the season. Everton was pretty well known before its great victory in Scotland; but when, after travelling from Liverpool, in October, they played the famous Celtic, in Glasgow, on their own ground, and beat them by two goals to nothing, their reputation became universal. There is no club in the country where there are such “gates” as there are at Everton, and probably there never has been such a gate as there will be today, when fully 20,000 people will pack themselves into the enclosure an hour before the commencement of the match, and when fully another 20,000 would gain admission if they could, notwithstanding the double prices. This is the match against the Preston North End, who have beaten the Evertonians before, and who are acknowledged to be the finest combination team in existence. Their “playing together” and their “close passing” is always a marvel of science and skill and decision, and in this respect Everton has hitherto been behind them. There are some members in the Everton club who are fine individual players, and are looked upon as “brilliant” by the crowd of onlookers for individual and isolated feats of prowess, but as Mr. Hannah wisely and judiciously points out, these personal performances do not win a match, no matter how “pretty” they may look to the spectators. It is the combined action that asserts the superiority of the team, and in this quality the North Enders have been supreme. It is to be hoped that this time the great improvement of the Everton group, under Mr. Hannah's stringent discipline, will give the North End a particularly hard nut to crack, and that the gold medallists and others who have so great a temptation to show their personal skill at the expense of the combination will be so suffciently under the control of more experienced minds that they will no imperil the chances of the match. Let me here, before introducing the reader to Mr. Hannah briefly mention that this year's record of the team is a remarkable one. They have won twelve matches, lost two, and drawn three. Their have beaten Stanley, Earlestown, Blackburn Rovers (3-2), South Shore, Burnley (2-1), Bolton Wanderers (4-3), Earlestown, Celtic (2-0), Stoke (8-0), Burnley (4-3). They have lost against the Wolverhampton Wanderers (1-2), and Notts County (3-4), and drawn against the Wolverhampton Wanderers, Derby County, and Accrington. This is surely one of the most brilliant records that ever fell to the lot of a football club.

Mr. Hannah is a quiet unsumming gentlemanly young Scotchman without very much appearance of the professional athlete about him as he sits in his little parlour writing a letter home. He gives me a courteous welcome, and offers with pleasure to give me any information that I may think of interest to the readers of the Echo. Occasionally a trifle cautious in answering questions, and with the tact of his countrymen he likes to know the drift and measuring of them before he answers. He is, however, as keen as usual. I was born, he say at Renton, and I was twenty-five years of age on the 17 th of last September. I started football as early as I was well able to walk; but seriously when I was fourteen. I played first with the Renton Wanderers, along with Kelly, McNea, and McCall, who are celebrated players. I first played with the juniors, and I was induced to join the Renton combination when it started. We were all very young then, and you will remember that this team beat the North End last year. It held the Scottish Cup –which is equivalent in importance to the English Cup here –for three years. They held the “Charity Cup “ for four years. I have played “back” since ever I started football. I was a professional jumper for four years, but played football in the winter. I was the champion jumper of Scotland for two years, and I also went in a little for running. I won a few sprint races, but I was always at jumping. I have seven gold medals for football –chiefly in Scotland, and I have had a large number of other prizes, such as clocks and things. In athletics the prizes were chiefly in money. I daresay I have won £300 altogether at jumping. I am the right back of the team. I played left at first, but I got my left knee hurt, and I could not play on the left wing for some time, so I shifted to the right wing, and have played right ever since. (Mr. Hannah here explained very interestingly to an outsider like myself how it was that either the left or the right leg had to be used according to the side of the field the player is placed on.) I came here first, he continued, in September last, and this, therefore in my first year as a “professional.” I was made captain when I came N. J. Ross was captain last year. He came from Preston and has gone back there. I was elected captain by the committee. Of course they had seen me playing in Scotland often. The committee have full power. Of course the captain has certain power. I some times attend the meetings if they went my opinion. The club as a body consists of season-tickets holders, and they elect the committee to govern the club. The committee deals with the admission money. The average receipts for a match is probably about £160. Some matches have brought a £200 gate, and probably on Saturday, when the prices are to be doubled, the receipts will be £400. The income last year was between £4,000 and £5,000. Of this £1,000 was spent in improving the stand accommodation. The salaries of the players, who are all professionals, run to £3 a week, but some of the players get more than this. I have played in every match with the team, and in no matches outside it. Our best match was, I think, with the Blackburn, on September 7, when we won by 3 to 2. We beat the Celtic –the best team in Scotland –by 2 goals to nothing, and considering that we travelled from here to their ground I think that was a very good performance. We were accused of playing a bit rough, but they played quite as rough as we did. As a rule, they play rougher in Scotland than here; the umpires being not nearly so strict there. Sometimes a player on the spur of the moment may lose his temper. But generally after the match we are all friends again. “ I saw the match against Blackburn Rovers, “ I interposed, “and I saw a man ordered off the field. Do you think there was any real foul play, or that it was his fault?”

“ I don't think it was altogether his fault. He is a big, heavy chap, and sometimes a heavy man may play a bit rough without meaning it.” What do you think of the Association game as compared with the Rugby? –Well, the best critics know that the Association game is the more scientific. There is the least danger in it, and accidents are comparatively few. Any serious accidents in your experience? –I have known two or three at Renton, such as fellows getting their collar bones broken, but in the Rugby game you hear of legs and arms being broken every Saturday. As I said –they are much stricter here than in Scotland. As to the advantage of the Celtic when we went there, I consider a resident team playing on their own ground has the advantage of the visiting team by a goal against those who have had to travel. What is the most important position in the game: - Well, all positions so to speak are “most important.” Some way the half backs, because they are a kind of backs and forwards combined. A half-back has to stop the opposing forwards and feed his own forwards, so I think myself the half back is the most responsible position on the field. The captain: - Well, the captain, if he sees any weak points, may shift the left half backs over to the right, he can shift the team as he thinks right, to try and make up any defect. The Everton team may so far be regarded as a leading team, and I think we are ahead this year, so that so far we may be considered champions of the League. We have, however, not played half our matches yet. If we beat the North End on Saturday we will be top of the League.

How is your team as compared with the North End: - Well, I think, taking our men all round individually we are quite as good as the North End, but we have not got the same combination. They work together better than we do. The North End is the heavier team by far. I think they and Renton team are the two best for scientific play. The great art of football is the short passing game. It is better to tackle a man when they are all closed up than it is in long passing. The short passing is the best playing game right up to the gaol, when you have the best chance of shooting through. The best rule is to work well up to the goal, and then “Don't hesitate to shoot.” Trainor, of the North End, I think is the best goalkeeper, and then Lindsay of Accrington. Smalley is our best, and I think he is not far behind either of them. Some goalkeepers are clever with their hands, others with their feet. Trainor is a wonder with both hands and feet. He is 5 feet 9 inches, and can stop either high or low ones. As to our training, we train twice a week on our ground in private, of course. This week we have been out three times. Does your training and playing during the season involve any particular dieting? – No we, just take out own diet as usual. The Everton team are all most temperate men. None of them are very fond of strong drink, though we do not pretend to be altogether teatotal. That is the ruin of some of the Scotch teams –perhaps one or two of the players will get drunk previous to the match, and a man that drinks too much can't play football; I don't care who he is. In the course of our practice we run a couple of sprints –30 or 40 yards. We sometimes divide the team, and sometimes shoot for the goal and such like. I certainly think that speed is conducive to good football, though not always. Geary is apt to be too fast sometimes. If he gets clean right past the backs he can beat them, but it does not always come off; and the centre forward should feed his wing. Geary goes in sometimes for single-handed play, and it looks brilliant. It might come off twice in half-a-dozen times, but it can't always come off. This is a little defect that can always be remedied.

Who is the best all-round player? –Well, in my opinion the best all-round players are N.J. Ross, of the North End, and Drummond, or Oswald, of Notts County. But it depends on the position. Another man could not play in my place, and I could not play in Geary's place with the same satisfaction. Hannah added that he was 5ft 7in., and weighted 11 stone 7lbs. He is a dairyman by calling, was married eighteen months ago, and speaks with affectionate regard for the native place and his home. He made some strong remarks about the absurdity of the Scottish system of alleged “amateurism.” They are supposed to have no professionals in Scotland, but as a matter of fact (though he had never received six pence himself there) he knew many players who received pay in Scotland, and the regulation of the Scottish Association in this respect was set at defence. He though very strongly that they ought to legalise professional play in Scotland as in England. There was no mistake professionalism did exist in Scotland. He spoke most warmly of the Everton committee, by whom he had been handsomely treated. He had been told before he left Scotland “ that they would not pay him,” but he laughingly added that the committee had treated him in a thoroughly business-like manner. He thought they ought to have a good chance of winning on Saturday. Had seen good players “funk” before a match to such an extent that they were sick before going on the ground, but once they got experience they were as cool as a cucumber. He never looked as the crowd himself or took the slightest notice of cheers or hisses. Anyone who did would be “ put of his work.” Sometimes in the excitement of a game a player could not hear the shouts at all. Football was “the most popular game in Great Britain,” and he personally could not help playing it. Couldn't say what he would do without it. Where he came from the little boys of three and four played it, or tried to. Had never played cricket or baseball. At football there was sometimes a great advantage in choice of stations, especially if there was much wind. The Everton ground, he understood, would hold over 20,000 people, and it was the most perfect ground in the kingdom, particularly for accommodation. Your “special” took his leave, wishing the Everton captain and his team every success.

THE EVERTON HEROES.
November 16, 1889.
The Liverpool Football Echo.
During the past few years, the Association football has made giant strides, in Liverpool and district, as witness the existence and prosperity of such teams as those disporting themselves before thousands of spectators, week by week, at Everton and Bootle; also somewhat minor clubs of good standing, as the Stanley, Bootle Athletic, and a dozen teams, all capable of giving a fairly scientific exposition of the game. Ten years ago, a good game of Association football was not to be seen in the neighborhood, the field being almost entirely held by the Rugby Union men. But each year the circular ball had continued to assert a rivalry with the oval, till now the two clubs first named are the means of drawing more spectators than all the Rugby matches put together. And their comparative standing, too, is far ahead of the local Rugby clubs; for New Brighton, Birkenhead Park, Liverpool, or the Old Boys all occupy much lower positions in the world of Rugby football than do the Everton in the Association community. The Everton men can give the best teams in the three countries a good game; while the local Rugby fifteens make but a sorry show against such a team as the Fetter Loretto men, West of Scotland, Bradford, and the local champions hailing from balmy Runcorn. Then, in the matter of gates, Everton stands at the top of the list, there being very few clubs in the British Isles showing a weekly average equal to the register of their takings. Yet it is only nine years since the club was formed, their first ground being a public one, in Stanley Park, where of course, the great desideration of every Association club –“gates” to wit –could not be obtained. For several years the club's existence was not conspicuous for any remarkable feats, all the players being local and purely amateur ones, both of which qualifications have now been done away with. Of which more anon. After four years' play, the public interested in such matters aroused to the fact that Everton might be made famous for other things than toffee, and the supremacy of that toothsome dainty as the particular and peculiar characteristic of the place was at the last threatened, The “King of Everton” –who as all the world knows, is Mr. John Houlding –consulted with his liege subjects, and the result was the acquisition of a piece of land near Stanley Park, Mr. Houlding generously financing the transaction. With the modesty of greatness, the committee at first erected a couple of small stands for the accommodation of spectators, and until the end of 1887 these sufficed. At the beginning of last season, however, it was found absolutely necessary to increase the accommodation, which was done, at the an expenditure of £1,500 with the result that Everton ground is now as comfortable and as well fitted as any in the kingdom. At each side are large covered stands, behind each goal are other stands, holding nearly 4,000 each, and taking all the stands together, about 12,000 people have a good view of the game from them; while another 6,000 have the same from standing room on the ground. Notwithstanding this, the spectators at times are almost inconveniently crowded, and gates of nearly 20,000 are not altogether unknown. The total receipts last year were £4,500; but of the sum at least £45 was expended every week for paying the professional players. There were, however, circumstances, which will hardly occur again, necessitating this large outlay. Several professionals who were engaged at the beginning of the season did not realise the expectations formed of them, and others had to be looked for, so that the committee were compelled to pay for men whom they did not require. Owing to their lengthily goldbags, the Everton Club can offer to good professionals exceptionally favourable terms, and of course the Land of cakes, being the home of the Association game, has had to part with several fine players, who show an inclination of going “back again.” Among them are a couple of Scottish Internationals –Hannah, the captain, and Alexander Latta. Although Liverpoolians and especially Evertonian folk, are proud of their club, it is to be regretted that there is not a single homegrown player in the team, as this is surely a sad indication that the district cannot raise a man of really first-class form. It will doubtless be of interest to-day if we give a brief sketch of the football career run by the Everton team. Individually as it was constituted a few weeks ago; but doubtless one or two alterations have been made, Weir for instance, not turning out of late, owing to injuries received. Beginning at the goal we take RE Smalley who frequently known as Bob Smalley. Bob is a professional of the game, who's place on the field is under the cross-bar, where he has achieved no little fame. He is 5ft 8in, in height, and his kicking weight is 10st 10lbs. Robert is a Lancashire lad, and first saw the light in 1866 in the town of Darwen, after which the family removed to Preston. There Bob joined the North End, and for the reserve team he made his appearance as left wing forward. During a match he was roughly handled and subsequently to this he was allocated the post of goalkeeper, and in that defensive position, he has remained, repelling hot shots, fisting out shots. He has played for the Everton now for two years. Then come the two full backs, of whom A. Hannah (Captain). Andrew is his front name, and Scotland is his nation, for he was born in Renton, Dumbartonshire on September 17, 1864. He stands 5fy 7ins, with his coat off, and kicks the beam –not to mention the ball –at 11 and half stone. When sixteen years of age, Andy betook himself to jumping, an exercise in which he speedily attained and rivalling of springheel Jack. He attended all the games, as athletic sports are termed across the border and won many prizes, both in running and jumping contests, and truly he made a good thing out of his speed and spring. The Renton wanderers soon enrolled him in their ranks, and as full back he played with both sill and in judgement. Soon after the Renton club took him, and Hannah becoming a member rapidly worked himself into the front rank of footballists. He was chosen to represent his county against Glasgow, and later on he played full back against Lancashire, and he afterwards represented his country against Wales in 1887, and last season his services were wanted by the Everton Club, with the result that at the beginning of the present season he was installed as captain. Hannah is not only a fine player, but he makes a good captain. The other back is, D. Doyle , the biggest man in the team, standing an inch and a half under six feet, and weighting 13 and half stone. Danny is not such a broth of a boy as his name might imply, for it was in Paisley he was born, over twenty-three years ago. Doyle's weights has served him in good stead during the eight years he has figured on the fields of various clubs, his first love being the Airdie Club, which he added for four years than playing a season with Brosburn, and afterwards with the Edinburgh Hibernians. In 1888, at the beginning of the season he went to Grimsby, leaving that club for the Bolton Wanderers before the season closed. With the Wanderers he did great things being on the ball when they beat the proud Preston by 5 goals to one. In may of this year Doyle broke the proverb by going back to Scotland, but he once more said farewell to Auld Reakie and the Gralasmarket, and joined himself unto the Everton club. Both as a defensive and an aggressive player Doyle is a valuable man, and plays with equal football on either side. The right half-back at present, is Charles Parry , who has seen but nineteen summers, or perhaps in the case of a football player we should say winters. At any rate, he is nineteen years of age, 5ft 8 in, in height, and weights 12st, 2lb when in good conditions. He is a robustly built young fellow, and has been extremely useful to the team, first as a forward, and more recently –since Weir was hurt at Wolverhampton –at half-back. Parry's first exploits in the football field were on behalf of a small football club in Oswestry, subsequently casting in his lot with the Chester St. Oswald's with whom he played as centre forward till last season was well on the wane, when he joined Everton. The left back is G. Farmer , who was born in Oswestry twenty-six years ago, weights 11 st , and stands barely 5ft 6in. Geordie is a great favourite with the Everton people, before whom he has been for a long time, being almost a Liverpoolian by right of his seven years' residence here. Taking into account the tender age of the game he may be fairly called a genuine Liverpool player. The gentleman who does the sketches for the Football Echo has rather failed to catch Geordie's charming smile, but for this he has nobly attempted to compensate by giving a fine moustache. Farmer and his smile appeared first to support the fortunes of the Oswestry eleven, and by his qualification there be thrice donned jersey for Wales, look you, as left wing forward. He has played several times for Lancashire, and no district team of Liverpool is complete without him. As a forward he played a dashing game, being as full of tricks as a Waterbury watch, but he has now settled down at half back, where his defensive tackling finds full scope. J. Holt , the centre half back, who is twenty-one, weights 10st, prompt, and is 5ft 4 and half inches, high so that he is not a large man. John Holt began his football career at the age of fifteen, with the Kings' Own F.C., but he ultimately joined the Church Club, and there were soon marked as a fine player. Four years since he came to Liverpool, playing with the Bootle Club for two years, but last season he came to Everton, being a very great acquisition to the club. Holt is without doubt one of the best half-backs in England, his tackling capabilities being what the old Dominie, termed “Prodesgious!” Last Year he played for Lancashire against East of Scotland, the country winning by seven goals to one. Last year he narrowly escaped becoming an international, being chosen as a reserve against Scotland. Probably one of the greatest favourities with the Everton crowds is F. Geary who is but a slender youth, weighting 9 stone, and being 5ft 7ins, above the level of the sea, so to speak, as it were, or words to that effect. Geary is a Nottinghamtonian –that's a good word –and first saw the light in the Lace City on January 23, 1867. A few years after this auspicious date he joined the Bothwell Rangers, playing both well and hard. He continued but one season with the Rangers, and then got on the books of the Basford Rovers, whom, however, he did not serve long, going to the Notts Rangers, with which club he played for three years. Inducements of a pleasant character were instrumental in securing his presence in the ranks of Everton. He was in Liverpool soon after the close of last season, and during the Athletic term he went in for amateur sprinting, in which field he carried off three firsts, two seconds, and ditto of thirds –not at all a bad record for toeing the mark nine times only. He subsequently ran as a professional, and in August last he won a £20 handicap in a most easy fashion, although he was a rank outsider in the opinion of the knowing “bookies.” Geary's great speed, his lightness of foot, and his agility are eminently useful qualities, and it is a sight to him scouring down the field with the ball at his toe, puraned by hopeful but leaden-footed opponents. The estimation in which the speedy forward is held may be gauged to some extent by the result of a competition recently organised by an athletic paper, Geary being voted the best forward in England. Although that is a matter for discussion, there can be no doubt he is one of the best centre forwards in the country. Alexander Latta , outside wing forward, is twenty-two years of age, he weights 12 stone, and stands 5ft 8in, in his socks. Since 1884 he played for Dumbarton Athletic, of which club he was as original member. He was chosen in his county team eight times, and he further represented Scotland against England in the matches last season, and against Wales the previous season. Latta is a new acquisition so Everton this year, his play being of that well judged nature which so strengthen any team. He is a really fine all-round player, and his large experience against first-class clubs is of much use to him. He has won about a dozen medals in football contests, the majority being gold trophies. Alexander Brady . Is another son of Caledonia. He is nineteen years of age, 5ft 5 and half in, high, and weighs 10 stone. He is fairly fast, very tricky, and has a wonderful control over the ball, which he can twist. Curl, and break in a manner the most surprising. His forward play is very good, his training being the Renton star and Renton Thistle Clubs. Last year he went to Sunderland in which club he played as an amateur, and subsequently he figured with the Burnley team. Later he returned to Glasgow, but was given a call by the Everton Club, with whom he hopes to remain. Edgar Chadwick is a Blackburn lad of twenty years, weights 10st, sharp and his front elevation is 5 and half feet. His first experience of the game with a club called the “ Little Dots,” which qualified him for a place in the Blackburn Olympic Reserves. His play in the team was so good that room in the first eleven was made, and Chadwick soon justified the action of the committee so that the Blackburn Rovers annexed him for a season, and last year he joined Everton. Edgar is a fine all round footballists, being a good shot, an excellent kick in any position, leaving one foot free, and his capabilities are available as half-back, or forward-a most useful man for the best team. J. Weir was a fine half-back for the club, but he got hurt some weeks ago. Although he is not yet playing again. Cain , who played with the Airdie Club till lately, has now joined the Everton, and plays at half, vice Farmer, who has not altogether please the committee of late. Milward, who plays for the first team this season, is a capital forward, although one of the youngest members of the team. He formerly played in the London district, where he earned for himself a reputation, which his play here has already enhanced.

EVERTON 1 PRESTON NORTH END 5 (Game 34)
November 18 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
Fans injured as barrier give's way behind goal
At twenty minutes to three the Everton team arrived on the field, and was greeted with loud cheers. The team was as follows: Everton: - Smalley goal, Hannah (Captain), and Doyle, backs, Parry, Holt, and Farmer, half-backs, Latta, Brady, Geary, Chadwick, Milward, forwards . A few minutes later the visitors came on, and were received with an enthusiastic outburst of cheering. The team was composed as follows: - Preston North End: - Trainor goal, Howarth and Ross (NJ) (Captain) backs, Kelso, Russell, and Grahams half-backs, Gordon, Ross (Jun), Thompson, Dewhurst, and Drummond, forwards. Fitzroy Norris referee. Hannah lost the toss, and Everton had to play with the sun in their faces. Geary took the kick off, and attempted to pass to Brady, but Graham interposed and kicked to Doyle, who removed the play further down the field. Latta and Nick Ross were on the ball, and the North End back was only just able to clear. Then a pretty piece of play between Chadwick, Midward and Geary took place Howarth, however beating then. The Visiting left wing carried the ball up. Parry neatly beating them. Another temporary raid by the home left wing was made, Howarth again cheering, and giving Gordon and Young Ross a chance. They went away, and some pretty passing occurred at the top corner of the field, the venue of the combat again being removed. Up and down the field the players went, Chadwick and Milward giving Latta a chance but was robbed by Ross not a second too early. The North End went up the field in gallant array forced a couple of corners, which were well placed and equally well defended. Latta was next prominent but found Graham a stumbling block, and then Kelso was well hooted for fouling Milward. The leather was taken from the kick right in the North End goal mouth, and the crowd, which had become intensely excited, swayed forwards, and the barrier behind the goal posts, broke down before the tremendous pressure of the thousands of people behind. A great mass off people lay on the ground, and some of those under neath were hurt, one boy apparently being severely injured, as he was carried by several of the officials to the centre of the field. Play was stopped for some minutes and conjectures were made as to weather the ball had gone through the posts previously, as it appeared to have done. The barricade having been placed in position again, a corner was given to Everton, the ball, however, being kicked behind the posts. North End took up the play from the kick off, Ross, jun, and Thompson being to the fore and “hands” was given against Everton right in the goal mouth, but the leather sailed high over the bar. Ross spoiled Latta when that player looked like becoming dangerous, North End not being able to remove the danger the home forwards playing together in grand style. Nick Ross kicked high in front of the own goal, but Milward could nothing with the chance, “hands” against the visitors again helped Everton, and Russell meeting their attack, transferred the played into the home quarters, where exciting play took place, Dewhurst eventually ending a fine concerted attack by kicking behind. Thompson, Jimmy Ross, and Gordon showed good combination, but were robbed by Doyle, who kicked to Ross, and the players returned it with interest. Hannah replied to the same effect and Latta rushed away, Chadwick and Milward shooting in beautifully, Trainor having to save. Jimmy Ross dashed away up the right, Holt coming to the rescue and enabling Latta to run down and send in a grand long shot, which did not attain the success, it deserved. Dewhurst Ross, and Thompson ran and passed splendid down the centre, but Dewhurst lost his head, and, shooting wildly, a grand chance was lost. The play up to this point had been of the first water, and Everton took up the play, and a grand attack ended by Geary beating Trainor amid thunderous applause. Again Everton were on the attacking side, and retained the ball well into their opponents' territory a regular bombardment being opened on the North End defence, by which the spectators were kept up to a pitch of wild excitement. All the forwards had their attempts to lower the Preston colours defeated, and a length Geary unwittingly caused the play to be changed to midfield by a kick behind the upright. Brady initiated a pretty movement, frustrated by Russell, and play settled in midfield for a few moments. Geary was cheered for a grand pass but Farmer kicking too hard spoiled a grand sequence of passing. North End had a turn, and gained a corner taken by Drummond but Doyle easily removed the danger not to be denied, North End came again, and Jimmy Ross shot over the bar-a near thing. “Hands” against North End was given in midfield, but the North End forwards sailed down in line Parry grandly spoiled the passing and gave the leather to Milward and Chadwick, who rushed down a grand style, Geary however, rendering the movement useless by kicking right to Thompson's feet. When endeavoring to pass to Latta, each end was visited in turn, the calls, however, being fruitless. When North End were executing some of their beautiful passing in front of goal, Drummond was penalized for offside, and again Everton were assisted by “hands” against Russell. This gave Latta another opportunity his shot just failing its mark. The visting right wing raced up and Young Ross propelled the ball clear over the bar, when a goal appeared imminent. Milward forced a corner from Howarth, but Gordon relieved and Thompson and he took the leather right down the centre. Dallying too long, however, Doyle was enabled to rob them and gave the leather to his forwards, who did not make anything of their chance, North End again were to the fore and Smalley grandly saved two shots from the foot of Jimmy Ross, one bring especially difficult to prevent from going through and further he nullified a grand attempt by Gordon. Half-time- Everton 1 goal; North End nil. Upon recommencing the visitors made tracks for the opposing goal, Smalley distinguishing himself by rescuing the ball from a couple of well meant attempts by Thompson and Ross and Farmer spoiled Gordon and kick out of play. Jimmy Ross received the ball, and when just about to shoot, Holt splendidly took the ball from the feet. The visitors were at this juncture having all the play, and could not be checked, Thompson from a pass by Dewhurst, shooting pass Smalley and making the score equal. Kicking off Everton rushed the leather into the visitors quarters, and an exciting scrimmage took place in front of the uprights. Offside against Everton gave relief and play again settled in midfield, Geary broke away, and after rushing through his opponents had the goal at his mercy, but shot wildly, to the evident disappointment of the admirers. Graham easily beat the home forwards, when they were becoming dangerous, and a foul was given against Everton in a dangerous position. Nothing came of it, Smalley neatly clearing North End swarmed like bees in front of Everton's goal, and at length a foul was given to the visitors' close to the goal line. The kick was well placed in the goalmouth, with the result that Russell headed over all his antagonists and scored a second goal for his side. North End received the leather from the kick off, and again swarmed in front, Thompson sending a hot one to Smalley, who scored grandly when failing. North End had evidently got the foot of their opponents, and were having nearly all the game. Everton amidst the encouragement cheers of their supporters tried hard to breakaway but could make no headway, and Gordon from a pass by Thompson beat Smalley for the third time with a magnificent fast low shot. The Preston boys were playing away with wonderful dash, Smalley being compelled fisting the ball away. The Everton right tried to get away, but Nick Ross was on the ball, and would not be denied, his privilge of checking the advance. He gave the ball to his right wing and Smalley was within an ace of being defeated by a low shot by Dewhurst's. Having tasted blood the visitors were battling with that earnestness which is characteristic of them, and Russell and Jimmy Ross raised the score to fourth goals against Everton's one. North End rushed right away from the kick off, their football showing what scientific football really was, and Jimmy Ross easily beat beat Smalley. Graham was a stumbling block to Latta and Brady effectually spoiling them and giving his forwards splendid chances, of which they were not slow to take advantage, and a perfect fusillade was kept up against the home fortress. Dewhurst raced up the centre and passed finely to Thompson, Holt robbed him a gave the leather to his front ranks. Weak combination again was to the fore, and North End, playing with great dash gave Smalley several hard nuts to crack, one shot by Kelso being very difficult one to negotiation. Smalley just managed to keep it out. Doyle was cautioned for rough play. Latta got away and again found that Nick Ross was too clever for him, and mainly owing to this fine player does Howarth the Evertonians were rarely suffered to make an invasion assist tactics. The play was settled in midfield, all the efforts of the home team to get forward seeming fated to ill-luck. Compared with their opponents they moved with the agility of snails and were repeatedly to bad. Nothing was too difficult for the visitors to attempt and time after time when it seemed impossible for the left-back to get near the players or the ball, by dashing runs or plucky tackling the Evertonians were defeated. Final Result; Everton 1 goal, Preston North End 5 goals.

PRESTON NORTH END RESERVES 0 EVERTON RESERVES 1
November 18 1889,
Liverpool Mercury
No details.

EVERTON REVIEW
November 18 1889.
The Liverpool Mercury Preston North End on Saturday'came saw, conquered “There is nothing novel in this statement-the fact has been repeated oftener by North End than by any other club in a given time-but, whilst none are surprised that Everton were beaten, few were prepared for their utter rout of 5 goals to 1 on their own ground, the greatest disaster Everton have suffered for at least three years. Liverpool like other places, made much of the visit of the English cupholders. No club enjoys such widespread popularity and though their success has not of late been so uniform as previously, they still charm as no other club can. If engaged in an exhibition game merely they are sure of having the honour of performing before a “full house.” But the match on Saturday was not a show; it was a stern bout-of-great moment, the issue of which was of such concern almost as a final cup tie, for whatever emerged in triumph would head the League and Probably remain there for the rest of the season. Everton have made such a great name for themselves this year that the contest was generally considered an open one though Preston North End were the most fancied and with the promise of a splendid exposition of the dribbling game, there was, of course a phenomenally large company present. The capacious ground was packed to overflowing. The total number must have been very near 20,000, whilst a great many more were refused admission. The executive of the club admirably carried out the arrangements for the accommodation for the vast assembly, and only one mishap has been record. In the excitement of a severe assault on goal by Everton, the swaying crowd forced down the barricade behind goal, and about 100 spectators tumbled forward in a heap but happily the only injury reported is a broken arm to a boy. Prompt to time the players appeared on the scene, all were well received, J.N.Ross particularity so. The home team opened badly, by losing the toss, and had to turn their faces to the sun but this was balanced somewhat by having the advantage of the slope. Play started on pretty even lines, Preston showing the better combination. Gradually Everton gathered strength, and the left wing were enabled to get within shooting range when Milward struck the post. Geary sent in a return from Trainor and claimed to have scored. Simultaneously, however the crowd fell in and stopped play, a corner was the ruling of M. F.Norris, and the game was renewed after five minutes delay. Everton returned frequently to goal just now in good formation, and in a while Brady cleverly beat Trainor from a central position the shout of triumph being taken up-gain. Nothing further was scored up to the interval. Though North End were very near equalising just before the whistle blew. The fact that Everton led by a goal at half-time was duly recognized with cheers and all so far, was as merry as the proverbial marriage bell. But a rude awakening was at hand, so soon as the restart had been effected the visitors swooped down on Smalley in irresistible force their firm footing and short passing enabling them to pen Everton up, and with seldom a breakaway to relieve the monotony, the home team for 20 minutes were thrown hard on the defence during which period five times Smalley was defeated. The game afterwards was more even, but Everton could make no good aims, and had to retire badly beaten. The explanation briefly appears to be this. The ground was heavy, Everton held their own when fresh and playing downhill, but were paralyzed when having the hill against them. North End were heavier man, and, being thus able to stay better could maintain, and indeed improve their unsurpassable combination. They individually played a superb game, with the exception perhaps of Dewhurst. All the physically strong men of Everton did well, and Holt never did cleverer work, but Farmer, Geary, and Brady, seemed completely fagged before the finish. Everton's solarium in a record “gate” together with the Reserve's victory of a goal, over Preston North End's Reserves.

EVERTON FOOTBALL CLUB
November 19 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
To the editor of the Liverpool Courier.
As a patron of Everton for the last five years, and a spectator at the Preston North End match against Everton. I fate the liberty of making a few remarks on their play. On Saturday it was plainly seen the Everton lost the match simply because their forwards were unable to combined and they received little or no assistance from the half-backs. To remedy these defects I would suggest that Milward should be placed in the centre and Geary, the present centre, put on the outside left wing the place that would be vacated by Milward. I would also suggest that Parry and Farmer at half-back should be Weir and Cain. The team would be Smalley Hannah, Doyle, Weir, Holt, Cain, Latta, Brady, Milward, Chadwick, Geary, and i am sure the combination of the above would be for in front of that which was shown by the Everton team of last Saturday, yours etc Robert Stavely. Liverpool, Nov 18, 1889

EVERTON FOOTBALL CLUB
November 20 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
Sir- I like to take the liberly of adding a few remarks to your correspondent's (Robert Stavely) letter of yesterday's date, about the North End v Everton match. First, although the North End gained a decisive and well deserved victorty, there can be no doubt that the sodden state of the ground rendered them a great advantage. Secondly the incompetence of one of Everton's halves to deal with the opposing forwards was painfully apparent to Evertonians, and as North End soon detect any weak spot in a team, they directed their attack chiefly through this special point. Lastly, I think that Everton need not despair and with a slight alteration in their team that contains, Hannah will again lead them onto, triumph and victory. This following team I would suggest to tried in one of their matches during this season this team Smalley, Hannah, Doyle Parry, Weir, Holt, Latta, Brady, Milward, Chadwick, Geary.
Yours etc, Never too late to Mend- Liverpool Nov 19 1889.

EVERTON FOOTBALL CLUB
November 21 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
Sir- I read “common sense's” letter in today's Courier with great interest, it is very evident the writer was not at the match between North End against Everton, or he would have had more common sense them to rush into print. Parry the best “Half” in the Everton team, well, it is the first time I have heard about it. My experience of football and football players (and is a longer experience than “common sense's”) leads me to the conclusion that J Weir is the best half-back at Everton in front of Farmer, and Holt but then Cain is better than either Parry, Holt or Farmer. I am sure anybody with common sense would say so if they saw him play. In conclusion I say let Everton play the team I suggested, and they will meet with success-yours etc, Liverpool, Nov 20 1889. Robert Staveley.

“Joesph G Allen” writes: - As a member of the Everton football club I agree with much that is said by “Robert Staveley” that something will have to be done and that speedily to remedy the defeats that were so transparent to the thousands of supporters who witnessed Saturday's memorable match. The question is how? Certainly not in the way suggested by “Robert Staveley” leave the forwards as they are at present. They can and do combine, and few will gamsay, that Geary in good form can keep his wings together equal with any centre in the kingdom. The worst fault forward is undoubtedly Chadwick's wandering instead of keeping on his wing, and the combined with the intense eagerness of all the forwards to score, tends frequently to mar combination of attack. Our forwards would do well to emulate the cool, dashing style of the eminent forward, Latta, and work like him from beginning to the finish of the game, and the result would prove the lesson's worth. Saturday's game conclusively proved that the half-backs, useful trio as they are, when the pinch comes, lack the staying power so requisite in a half-back, upon which both backs and forwards whelly rely. Weak in the halves means broken combination, and that's what it meant on Saturday. Unable to withstand the severe attack of Preston, they soon held aloft the flag of distress, and the backs and forwards receiving practically no assistance, the goalkeeper is beaten by shot's impossible to get away. It is here the committee must reinedy. They of course must make the best of the men they have, but I think they should not forget that such good men as Frank Sugg, Cain and Nidd would, in my opinion have done better services on Saturday's heavy ground than the halves who did duty. I am quite sure the committee are quite alive to the changes that will have to be made, for no committee, in my humble opinion could labour with greater determination, patience and perseverance than the body of gentlemen, who never guide the destines of the club, and great credit is due to them for the present improving position of the club; and had it not been for the defection of Gordon Ross, and Groves they would have made the best of teams strike their flags to the Everton club.

“Twister” says: - as an admirer of the Everton F.C. I could not help but feel indignant at “Roberts Staveley” suggesting to rearrange the team and put two men out. If he is annoyed as them for not winning on Saturday last, he is not the only one by hundreds, but he should not rush into print making such poor suggestions, for I am sure there are able men on the committee to suggest alterations, and as for putting a player out like Parry, you never mean it Robert, I am sure. In my humble opinion I consider him a spendid player, particularly last Saturday for he can stand a charge like a rock.

EVERTON FOOTBALL CLUB
November 22 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
To the Editor of the Liverpool Courier. Sir- Noticing the public opinion on Saturday's match between the above club club and the Preston North End, I take the liberty of asking you the publish these for lines in your valuable paper. I quite agree with one or two gentlemen, and as a member of the Everton club, I think I may say a few words in favour of our lads. I believe Smalley capable of keeping goal with any goalkeeper in the country. The backs division is also very strong but the half-backs were weak on Saturday. Certainly to move Parry, however a man that is coming to the front so fast, would be a great mistake. Holt was certainly somewhat out of form, and G.Farmer with all due respect to him, I think should retire, as I am sure he has fought hard enough for his club. I would have the forwards, as Hannah says it takes time for a team to play a good combination game, and no doubt we shall see in our own team quite as good passing as the displayed by our friends the Preston North End- yours etc, A Member That Never Despair, Liverpool, Nov 21, 1889.

Sir, - “Common sense” was on the Everton ground last Saturday, R.Smalley thinks not. Why ? Because “Common sense” and Parry was the best half-back Everton had. But Robert Stavely was there; he himself say so. and what does he say? Listen; there is no doubt Parry is a long way in front of Farmer and Holt. Then we agree; why quarred? But in his reconstruction he leaves out altogether the man who he himself considers best. He must learn to be consistent in his old age. He forgot to do so when young. Yours etc- Common sense. Nov 21 1889.

Sir, Referring to the letters relating to the above, I would suggest to the committee of the Everton F.C. that they look after a few of our local players to strengthen the half-backs division. There are several good juniors in our local clubs that would put the present three half-backs who play for the “Toffees” entirely in the shade. I would suggest the trial of such men as David Williams, George Wilson, and Todd in the place of the present three half-backs. Yours etc Full back Nov 21 1889.

Sir, Allow me to say a few words on this subject. I would like the committee of the club to take some means to check the abominable language used by the young men, and old ones too, unfortunately who attend the matches. My lady friends and I have been awfully shocked at times, and we have often had to leave the ground. Trusting the committee will alter such a bad state of things, yours etc, A Sister.

ASTON VILLA 1 EVERTON 2 (Game 35)
November 25 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
These teams played their first match in the League contest on Saturday at Perry Barr in fine but dull weather. It will be remembered that last year the Aston Villa defeated the Evertonians at Birmingham in a decisive manner, the game beening very tough. The home team was forced as follows: Aston Villa:- Warrer, goal, Aldridge, and Cox, backs, Devey, Cowan, and Burton half-backs, Brown, Allen, Hunter, Dickson, and Hodgetts, forwards. The Liverpool team only underwent one alteration, Cain taking Farmer's place Everton: - Smalley goal, Hannah (Captain), and Doyle, backs, Parry, Holt Cain half-backs, Latta, Brady Geary Chadwick, and Milward, forwards, Referee Mr Duxbury, and Messrs Frank Sugg and Albut as umpires . Just before three o'clock Aston Villa in the presence of 5,000 spectators took the kick off. The opening play was somewhat desultory until Everton worked down, and Latta evoked applause for some a clever shot. The home men then placed themselves in more favorable position. Hannah and Doyle however, not being found wanting, Dickson and Hodgetts carried the leather beautifully down, and when a goal seemed certain to result, Hannah came finally to the rescue. Allen immediately afterwards shot in the ball going rather wide, the home right wing then rushed down the force, and Hannah was only able to again interpose with his head and save the goal. Everton canted along, and Warmer grandly prevented a beautiful attempt by Chadwick from taking effect. The Villains now labored with a will, without result, although some of the opportunities were very simple. It fell to the luck of the Everton to break the ice, Chadwick sending in the ball, which glanced off Geary's head and passed the goalkeeper. Aston Villa strove to equalise, but their shooting being wretchedly weak, notwithstanding the easy chance offered, even their own supporters indulged in derisive remarks as to their play. The Villans obtained two fruitless corners, and then Everton rushed away Geary merely failing to score with a terrific shot. Then the visitors pressed their opponents, Warner fisting a shot from Chadwick over the bar, and giving a corner. This not being avail, the Villans by nice combined work gradually gained the opposite and forced Parry to grant a corner, from which the ball was neatly headed through, Smalley neatly fisting it from beneath the bar several times. The home men had excellent openings but there was not the slightest improvement in their shooting, the kicks being miserable failures. At length the home team, having possessed by far the greatest advantage in point of position, scored a goal Brown performing the trick with nobody but the goalkeeper opposing him. Latta and Geary bounded along and the former propelled a splendid shot, which was well fisted out, and Geary kicked over the bar. A corner ensused, but Everton did not improve upon it. Half-time, Everton 1 goal, Aston Villa 1 goal. On the resumption of play the visiting team exerted some pressure, no available opportunity of scoring, however, presented. A little time having lapsed, Chadwick made a gallant attempt, the ball just striking the bar. The ill-luck was at once atoned for by Geary sending one pass Warner a couple of minutes later. After the kick-off the Aston Villa boys made a transitory excursion on their opponents' territory and then Latta sprinting along, reached the goal line, from the entrance of which he cleverly shot across the goal mouth, Milward being a second too late in this attempt to crown the grand effort. Parry checked a threatening advance by his energy's with the result that the leather was rushed down, and some exciting play followed on front of Warner, the Evertonians opportunity having the goal, at their mercy. Cox came grandly to the relief, and the Villans assumed a very threatening aspect, two clever shots being satisfactorily negotiated by Smalley. The visitors went at it with determination and rushed their opportunities of a goal to a considerable extent. A couple of corners were given without practical result, but still the ball could not be removed. Warmer experienced several near shaves, eventually all danger being averted by a kick over the line. The home team moved along to the opposite end, though they did not effect anything, and then Everton worked back. Warner had to run out to meet a shot when the game was stopped owing to Geary being winded, but he quickly recovered. Encouraged by the spectators the home boys, put forth their best endeavours to bring the game on level terms, their well means attacks being foiled on every occasion. The visiting right moved very finely along, and Latta terminated the run with a grand centre, which was all but properly settled by Geary. The game continued somewhat in favour of the visitors, the pace at this period being faster than at any other portion of the game. Final Result Everton 2 goals, Aston Villa 1 goal.

EVERTON RESERVES 0 STOKE SWIFTS 3
November 25 1889,
The Liverpool Courier
This match was played at Anfield before a capital attendance. Both sides were strong Kirkwood playing half-back for the home team. It will be remembered that when Everton met the Swifts at Stoke the visitors had to put up with a several defeat- 5 to 1. Everton kick off, and for some time play was even, Edge and W. Tunncliffe broke away, and beating the home defence the latter player easily beat Joliffe, to the evident surprise of the home supporters. Everton had a turn, and Deane disappointed his admirers by shooting wide of the posts. The visitors' right wing put in a grand dribble, and Martin sent in a grand shot, which was within an ace of taking effect. The homesters fully alive to their position, began to press Eccles however, neatly removed the venue to midfield, were a foul was given against the Swifts, no advantage accured to the home team, and the visiting front rank led by Owen, were again in the home territory, Nidd being able to neat the attack at the expense of an abortive corners. Everton broke away R.Jones being the shinning light, but found the defence all there. Martin next tried a long shot, which Merritt saved admirably. The homesters were now having nearly all the game. Deane from a pass by Kirkwood was putting in some good work, which was spoiled by Jones shooting wildly to the chagrin of the crowd. Tannicliffe was cheered for two pretty runs up the left, Nidd met him each time but could not stop him, Joliffe having to negotiate his shots which were first-class, Abbott ran splendidly down the right, amidst the encouraging cheers of the spectators, and tried a long shot, which seemed to go through and upon Mr Lythgoe giving the homesters a goal the visitors left the field. Not for long, however, the Evertonians gave way and Merritt amidst the groans of the crowd, took a goal kick. The visitors had for some time to put up with a lot of banter from the crowd, which did not seem to have much effect on their play. Hammond, who was in good form, stopped several rushes by the visiting forwards, who showed a good combination, and the game preceeded amidst great excitement, both sides in turn assailing their opponents' fortress, without being able to add anything tangible to the score. A pretty combined attack by the visitors took place in front of the home goal ending in Everton conceding a corner, but half-time arrived before it could be taken. Half-time score-Stoke Swifts 1 goal Everton Reserves nil.

Stoke kicked off, and play became for some time remarkably slow. The swifts were the first to throw off their lethargy and Nidd had to concede a corner, which was well taken, and Joliffe was called upon to defend, which he did in first rate style, Everton next gained a corner, a grand run by the Swifts right was rewarded after an exciting scrimmage by a goal. The home team tried hard to put a different complextion on the game, runs by R Jones and Abbott, and Orr and Walton were deservedly applauded, but the visitors' defence was very strong, Merritt putting in some grand kicks, which time after time cleared the danger. The excited spectators cheered Joliffe for throwing two grand shots out, and the cheers were well deserved, for they were remarkably fine saves. The Swifts were pressed severely, and Everton had to put all in to prevent them from adding to their score, Hammond doing good work. Even play followed, neither side being able to claim material advantage. Kirkwood went forward without making very great differences. Smith and Farmer the right and Centre half of the Swifts being quite able to deal with the attacks. Final score- Stoke Swifts, 3 goals Everton Reserves nil.

EVERTON REVIEW
November 25 1889.
The Liverpool Mercury
Everton on Saturday met the Aston Villa for the first time this season at Perry Barr. Compared with the form displayed by the Anfielders against the North End the previous week, it must be gratying to their supporters to see that they were able to hold more than their own against such a formidable team as the men of Perry Barr a performance which the North End failed to accomplish a few weeks ago. It was evident from a spectator's point of view that Aston Villa were determined to advance further up the League ladder, as they had undergone careful preparation during the week, and had even gone to Droitwich to have salt water “dips” Everton again requisitioned Cain at half-back, he taking Parry' s place on the right, and the latter that of Farmer's on the left, an alteration which tended to help the overthrow of the Villans. The game was a very fast one, all through, the ground seemingly suiting both sides. From the kick off Everton soon took up the play, and Warner's charge was early swarmed by the visitors, but a quarter of an hour had gone before Geary, from a clever pass by Chadwick, headed the first goal of the match. Aston Villa at various times severely tested the defence of Everton, but it was close to half time before Brown could equalise. The second portion went principally in favour of the visitors, and but for the grand goalkeeping of Warner, Everton victory would have been greatly increased. However a win of 2 goals to 1 was gladly welcomed by committee and players alike, and it still keeps them second on the League list. For Aston Villa, Warner was a great barrier to goal getting and it was surprising to see his finished style between the posts. Cox, who had more to do than Aldridge, did it well, whilst Cowan was far away the best of the halves; forward, Hunter and Dickson were slow, but the same does not apply to Hodgetts Brown, and Devy, who at times showed good form. Smalley, for Everton, was never severely pressed as the defence of Hannah and Doyle was perfect. The half-backs had always plenty to do, and it was a treat to see Parry disposing of the right wing of the homesters in the cooless possible manner. There was nothing to chose between the forwards as all played an unselfish, persevering and winning game. The Everton team after tea resumed their journey by the seven o'clock train from Birmingham to London and will meet the London Caledonians this afternoon at the oval, and the Casuals on Tuesday at Leyton.

LONDON CALEDONIANS 1 EVERTON 6
November 26 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
The Everton team arrived in London on Saturday night, and put up at the Covert-garden Hotel. The Weather was miserable on Sunday, but the members, accompanied by Mr. J.Houlding, Jun, Mr. Molyneux, and Mr. Ramsey, went down the river to Greenwich in beautiful weather. At Kennington Oval, yesterday and in the presence of 1,000 spectators Everton kicked off and immediately made tracks for the Caledonians goal, when play remained for a few minutes. Chiefly the end of Hogarth transferred the leather to the opposite end, where a futile corner was given. Here a brief stay was made, but Everton broke away, and mainly with the assistance of Frank Sugg, who was playing in Holt's place, the ball was taken well down, and Latta shot well down, and Latta shot well but somewhat slow. The play continued rather uninteresting, though fairly good runs were effected by the wingmen on both sides. Clever work by Latta, Brady, and Geary took place in the Caledonian quarters, and Latta put in a neat screw shot, which missed the mark, but enabled Chadwick to shoot through. Midfield play ensued until Latta and Brady raced down by really grand passing which delighted the spectators, and Latta then attempted to lower the caledonians colours, but shot wide though Milward should have settled the matter. The home team made a temporary incursion and then the Everton forwards rushed away, Geary concluding by sending in a low shot, which had the desired effort. With two goals to the good the visitors worked energetically, and after some pretty passing in the goalmouth, Cain kicked high to the goalkeeper, and Milward running up, headed the ball through. He was, however, ruled offside, and apparently somewhat unfairly. The Caledonians played up with greater spirit, and pressed for a few minutes but they found Hannah and Doyle were impregnable. A relieving kick placed the ball to Latta, who passed to Geary, Freedy sprinted away at a great pace, and outstripping the opponents until only the goalkeeper was in front of him, he shot the third goal. Following this, shortly Geary scored another. The Evertonians maintained their attacking methods, and Brady was very unfortunate in a shot, which hit the upright. This however, did not matter, as the ball rebound into play, and Milward getting hold of it passed to Chadwick who scored the fifth goal with a simple shot. Stirling, the home goalkeeper prevented the ball from beating him a few seconds after, and he was derisively applauded and chaffed by the spectators. Half-time result: - Everton 5 goals Caledonians nil. After the restart the homesters displayed a little more agility and quickly forced a corner. Cassleton took the kick and McAulay headed the ball past Smalley, the Evertonians now took the lead, and racing down the field some very exciting esisories occurred within a few feet of the home goal. All the forwards endeavored to get the sphere through without any luck, and Sugg at last spoiled the movement by kicking over the bar. However, the Metropolitans were not much better attended by luck, and the visitors moving along and going in grand style should have scored again, though Brady help, and a capital shot by Parry was well fisted away by the goalkeeper and a corner to the Evertonians followed. This was not improved upon, but still the Caledonians did not improve their position. The visiting right wing travelled nicely down, and Chadwick kicked fast, Monday interposing and saving the goalkeepers defeat. A corner fell to the left of Everton , and Milward should have put through the ball being placed well in the centre. There was a certain amount of carelessness and want of dashes in the form of the visitors in this half, or they would have scored several times. During the last ten minutes of play, the Liverpoolians beat their opponents at all points of the game, and it was only be mere chance that the score was not taken to double figures. After this heavy bombardment, Milward scored the sixth goal, and the game ended a few seconds later. Final Result: - Everton 6 goals, Caledonians 1. Teams London Caledonians: - Sterling, goal, Hadene, and Stewart, backs, Casulton, Janson, Barbour, Mcaulay, Howarth, Prior, Sergeant, Fry, Burns, Everton: - Smalley goal, Hannah (Captain), and Doyle, backs, Cain Sugg, and Parry, half-backs, Latta, Brady, Geary, Chadwick, and Milward forwards.

LONDON CASUALS 2 EVERTON 7
November 27 1889.
The Liverpool Courier
The second and most important of the two London matches was played yesterday at Leyton, on the Essex County Club Ground in the presence of over 1,000 people. During the morning the weather had been fine and frosty, but shortly before the match rain fell and rendered the ground heavy. Holt resumed his usual place, vice Sugg, who umpired. The Casual team was not very strong, only one of the brothers Walters playing at full-back. From the kick-off the Evertonians took the ball down to the opposing defence, Moon having to fist one from Brady, Glossop cantered away on the left, and several excellent shots were sent in by the Casuals, but Smalley, Hannah and Doyle were fully equal to the task imposed upon them. The visiting left wing worked back again, when Milward, whilst close into goal, shot over the bar. They retained their position, however, and forced a corner from which Geary headed through and thus notched the first goal. The home backs found it an extremely difficult matter to keep their antagonists at bay, and Latta, Geary and Chadwick each had unsuccessful shies at goal. Glossop again rushed away at a spanking pace but the run was rendered unless by a kick over the goal line. Then the Evertonians attacked with a vengeance, Holt nearly scoring with a long shot, and Moon fisting out a beautiful low shot. Milward raced away and finish up, an attempt, Moon easily executing the shot. Hannah easily checked a couple of advances by the Casuals, and gave the sphere to Brady and Latta; the last mentioned player-defeating Moon with a clinking shot. The outside right followed this up with an equally good endeavor a couple of minutes later, but on this occasion the goalkeeper was too sharp for his opponents. The visiting fairly held the advantage over the Casuals and would not be removed from the goalmouth until Brady claimed the credit of the third goal with a neat effort. Cox was applauded for a tricky dash down on the right, and he cleared Doyle, but Hannah came to the rescue. Nothing further was scored up till half-time. Thought the Casuals made temporary raids. Half-time Everton 3 goals, Casuals nil. It should have previously been mentioned that the composition of the Casuals team was almost the same as that of the Corinthians, who defeated the North End last Monday week. On recommencing play the Evertonians went right away down and Milward added the fourth goal. The visitors banged away at the goalkeeper time after time, and remained on their opponents' territory for some length of time by aid of the backs. Holt being particularly prominent. Geary with one of his pretty, low, fast shots, brought the score to five points in favour of Everton. The combination and tackling of the Liverpool men was really brilliant and the play was an improvement on that of the previous day. After the Casuals had paid a few compliments at the Everton end, the visiting right wing carried the ball down and a long oblique pass was made to Milward, who rushed in and with a lighting shot caused Moon's sixth defeat. The homeboys now went more to the front, but the opposing backs would not allow any liberties, and their labour was consequently in vain. Cox and Clarke rushed gallantly up the field, and passed all before them, but when a few feet in front of goal Clarke overran the leather, and Smalley successfully interposed. This was atoned for a few moments afterwards by Foux getting to the fore and beating Smalley. From the kick off the visitors raced away, and Brady shot though, but for some reason the point was not permitted. Again the home men went up to Smalley, and Foux rush the sphere between the sticks. The visitors had all the play to the finish and Milward scored the last goal, and the game ended Everton 7 goals Casual 2. Everton team: - Smalley goal, Hannah (Captain), and Doyle backs, Cain, Holt, and Parry half-backs, Latta, Brady, Geary, Chadwick, and Milward forwards.