February 1901

SOUTHAMPTON 1 EVERTON 3 (Fac Game 38)
February 11 1901. The Liverpool Mercury
Played at Southampton on Saturday. Everton had, with the exception of Watson, whose place was filled by Eccles, their usual League team, whilst the Southampton organisation was handicapped by the absentee of Wood and A.Chadwick, and under such conditions the prospects of the home side were not to bright. The sides turned out as follow: - Everton: - Muir, goal, Balmer and Eccles backs, Wolstenholmes, Booth, and Abbott, halfbacks, Sharp, Taylor, Proudfoot, Settle (captain), and Turner backs, Southampton: - Robinson, goal, Fey, and Molyneux (g) backs, Meston, Leo and Killean, halfbacks, Turner, Yates, Toman (w), Chadwick (e), and Milward (a), forwards. There was no advantage to be derived by winning the toss. Everton were the first to make progress, Sharp and Turner sending in centres that Fry and Molyneux attended to in able fashion. After ten minutes play which was favourable to Everton, the home side got into the swinging stride, and by dint of smart passing and general distribution of work were often a source of great anxiety to Muir and his backs. Eventually Edgar Chadwick obtained possession from Yates as a result of a free kick, and defeated Muit with a splendid shot. Play having been in progress about 25 minutes. Shortly afterwards Settle received a severe kick, below his knee, but was quickly attended to and rejoined his confreres about 15 minutes absence. Meanwhile Everton attacked strongly but no further scoring took place up to the interval, when Southampton led by a goal to nil. On resuming, Everton settled down to earnest work, and in the first few minutes Settle equalised from a free kick against Yates. This put further sting into the visitors attack, and for some time Robinson was kept well employed. It was only on rare occasions that the home forwards got down, Turner the outside right, being concerned in these movements, which, however, caused no difficulty to Eccles and Balmer. A further attack eventually resulted in Taylor placing his side ahead, and towards the close the Saints put on strenuous efforts to get level again. In this they were frustrated and during the last minute a smart bit of work resulted in the ball going to Turner, who clinched the matter by scoring a third goal, the final result was Everton 3 goals, Southampton 1.

EVERTON RESERVES 1 LIVERPOOL RESERVES 2
February 11 1901. The Liverpool Mercury
The above teams met at Goodison Park, before 8,000 spectators. The sides were as follows: - Everton: - Kitchen goal, Halliday, and Crelly backs, Blythe, Green, and Taylor (r), halfbacks, Corrin, Rankin Worthington, Gray, and Chadwick (t), forwards. Liverpool: - Storey, goal, Morris, and Glover, backs, Parry, Hunter (j), and Ferrier, halfbacks, Soulsby, Hunter (s), McArdle, Davies, and Satterthwaite, forwards. Worthington scored for Everton. Even play followed, Kitchen saving well. half time arrived with the score Everton 1 goal Liverpool nil. Liverpool at once attacked gaining a fruitless corner, McArdie scored for Liverpool, who continued to have the best of play. A penalty was given against Everton, from which Scatterthwaite scored, and Liverpool won by 2 goals to 1.

EVERTON REVIEW
February 11 1901. The Liverpool Mercury
In many respects Everton's tie with Southampton might be cleared as one of the stoutest tasks set to a visiting team. Southerners have had an exceptionally successful career in their own particular circle of competition, and the fact that last season they defeated the Evertonians in the first round, and eventually found their way to the final stages, is sufficient evidences of the progress of the game in the South. That Everton had no light task on hand was a general theme amongst Southern clubs, and to judge them the play in the first half of the game that the opinion seemed likely to be borne out by actual results. The home players set about their work at a truly astonishing pace, and jumping into an accurate stride from the outset they kept their opponents defenders extended to the fullest limit. The play of the halfbacks and forwards was crisp, well directed, and withal accurate, and the fine combination all along the van stamped the side as almost certain victors. Still, the Saints found the last Everton line of defence in a most stubborn mood, but during one of the loose moments when some misunderstanding appeared to exist between Booth and Eccles, Chadwick slipped in and opened the scoring with a fast and clever shot after 25 minutes play. There was no stopping the home team up to the change of ends but it must be inferred that the Everton forwards were idea for Robinson was twice tested with shots that would have beaten the majority of custodians. After the resumption of play, quite a change came over the game as slowly, but surely, did the visitors harass their opponents until towards the close they practically played them to a standstill. Evidently the home forwards had put forward their bests efforts in the initial moiety; certain it was they were completely shadowed in the second portion of the game with the result that the defence was overrun and had to strike their colours on three occasions. For this satisfactory state of affairs the Everton Club have by reason of the sterling play of the halfbacks much for which to be thankful for after play had been resumed, the trio took their opponents under their wing, so to speak and kept them there up to the close of operations. Booth played an untiring and effective game all though so that one can little wonder at the failure of Toman to keep his wings together. Wolstenholmes, invariably had the better of the tussles with Chadwick and Milward, while at the other end of the line, Abbott after once getting into his stride, shadowed Turner so effectively that there was an absence of those centres by this player which, not only during the first of the game under notice, but throughout last season's contest, had much to do with the discomfiture of the Everton team. There could be no question that the trio rendered splendid service, and it would be a difficult matter at present to find a more solid, capable and earnest set of players in the county. While singling out the middle line for special mention, it must not be inferred that there was any unevenness in other departments. The whole team played well to a man, and never did determination to struggle gamely against odds show itself so markedly as when the Skipper was rendered hors of combat. During his absence of about a quarter of an hour, the home custodian had a very anxious time, and the extra efforts put forward were continued after Settle rejoined his comrades with the result as stated above. While all did well, a passing tribute to the excellent defensive play of Eccles would not be out of place. In the second portion of the game he played in masterly fashion, and a continuance of such displays should permanently ensure his position of the premier team. Coming to the home players Robinson gave a capital exposition of custodianship in the first half of the game three shots from Settle, Turner, and Sharp being of such a character that required more than ordinary ability to negotiate. That represented the fullback division excellent all round athlete CB Fry, who occasionally assists the southern club, and by the ex-Evertonian, Molyneux. Both players got through their work in very capable fashion-indeed with regard to the latter it can safely be stated that he has improved considerably upon his Goodison Park performances. Plenty of dash, clean kicking and good placing were points common to both backs, and it was a pity that their good work was discounted in great measure by the unfair tactics resorted to by the half backs, for repeatedly was ground lost, and on one occasion a goal lost, as the result of free kicks. It was a stubborn game, in which Everton clawed themselves to be a more proficient and better-trained team, and if the same standard of play be maintained there should be no barrier to successful progress in the competition.

SOUTHAMPTON v. EVERTON.
Hampshire Advertiser - Wednesday 13 February 1901
The match was played at Southampton, and resulted in the defeat of the Saints three goals to one. In the first half half of the game the play was very fast, and of an interesting character. But one goal was scored, this being Southampton's solitary point of the game, which was obtained at the end of half-an-hour'a play. In the second portion the Southampton men gave very disappointing display. After the interval Settle at once equalised for Everton. After this the home team gave a very tame exhibition, and soon afterwards Taylor put the visitors ahead. Everton soon scored again by Turner, and thus won without difficulty, continuing to have by far the best of the game. The result was very disappointing Southampton folk, who thought that the Saints would just manage gain a victory.

EVERTON 5 MANCHESTER CITY 2 (Game 364)
Feburary 18 1901. The Liverpool Mercury
Hosie takes Williams place in goal, at the begin of second half, City down to ten men
The Everton team, after their fine performance at Southampton had a capital reception at Goodison Park on Saturday, when quite 20,000 spectators turned out to witness the return game with Manchester City. Turner, who was injured at Southampton, gave place to Corrin, while there were several changes in the City team. At 2-30 the players faced as follow: - Everton: - Muir, goal Balmer, and Eccles, backs Wolsteholmes, Booth, and Abbott, halfbacks, Sharp, Taylor, Proudfoot, Settle (captain), and Corrin, forwards. Manchester City: - Williams, goal, Read, and Jones, backs. Moffatt, Smith, and Hoale, halfbacks, Meredith, Harvey, Cassidy, Williams (f), and Dougal, forwards. The opening play was brisk, and interesting, and following several capital attempts to break through Settle took advantage of a slip by Williams, and put the first goal after twelve minutes play. On getting to work again, Meredith was conspicuous in an attacking movement, but there was no defeating the home defenders. Moffatt fouled Settle within the twelve yards line, with a resulting penalty kick goal, and for some time the “Cits” were kept firmly within their own half. A capital movement ended in Taylor adding a third. Play generally favoured the home side, though at times there were several capital sprints by the opposing wingers, but final efforts were abortive by reason of the able defence of Muir, Eccles and Balmer. At the interval the score stood: - Everton 3 goals, Manchester City nil. The visitors resumed with but tem men. Williams place in goal being filled by Hosie, while Jones represented the full back division. At once the play, as was only to be expected, became monotonously dull, on account of the frequent decisions for offside, and the spectators did not fall to give vent to their dissatisfaction. Hosie performed ably in goal, and several attacks on the home charge, looked like bringing about a tangible result, when Muir cleared with cleverness. Eventually Sharp tricked Jones, and put on a fourth goal, and an almost similar movement resulted in Taylor nothing a fifth. Meredith had the better of Eccles, and scored. and this was followed by another from the foot of Cassidy. No further scoring took place, and Everton won by 5 goals to two.

MANCHESTER CITY RESERVES 1 EVERTON RESERVES 3
February 18 1901. The Liverpool Mercury
This match was played at Hyde-road, before a good attendance. City played Gillespie, and Davidson, of the first team. Worthington started on behalf of Everton and after the usual returns, Gray notched the first goal for the visitors. This feat roused the home teams who bombardment of the visitors defence, Kitchen saving finely from Scotman Gillespie and Darnell. Up to the interval the City claimed the better part of the play, but failed to get on level terms with their opponents. Half time arrived with the score Everton 1 goal City nil. Upon restarting, the City went off with a rush, Hesham putting in a low shot, which brought Kitchen to his knees. The visitor's left wing got away, and from a foul against Munn, Roche scored the second point. Following this McDonald added a third. Just before the finish Gillespie scored for the home team, a fast game ending with the score City 1 goal Everton 3. (Game 23) Everton: - Kitchen goal, Halliday, and Crelly. Backs, Boyle, Green, and Taylor (r) halfbacks, Roche, McDonald, Worthington, Gary, and Corrin, forwards.

EVERTON REVIEW
February 18 1901. The Liverpool Mercury
The premier team of Manchester had not had a very enviable experience on the occasion of its visit to Liverpool in First League warfare. Last year, which was the first appearance of the “Cits” in the upper circle, a score of 4-0, was recorded against them at Goodison Park, whilst 5-2 was the result of their visit to Anfield, they being content with the two goals. In addition, it should be remembered that three defeats followed reverse at home from the two Liverpool teams, but although the Anfield eleven repeated their previous season's triumph at Hyde-road in December last. Everton had two months before this been vanquished on the same ground. The latter reverse was amply avenged on Saturday, when after a game which was in many respects sadly disappointing, five goals were again registered against the Mancunians, and the wonder is that this number was not materially increased. The character of the play was completely spoiled owing to the adoption of the one back system in the second half by the visitors, though to some extent they were justified in so doing, as their custodian, Williams had been prevented from turning out after the interval. Owing to injury received in the earlier portion of the contest. With a full complement of players, the “Cits” were overplayed, and whereas in the first half the game was one-sided, in the second portion it was off-sided. Everton had their opponents well in hand throughout, and the visitors defence was kept fully employed; in deed 20 minutes had elapsed before Muir was called upon to handle. During this period the home side had netted the ball thrice- once from a penalty kick- and it must be admitted that the play they fully deserved such a pronounced result. They were continually forcing the game, and the “cits”defence had all their work cut out to keep the sprightly invaders under anything approaching moderate control. On the other hand, the visitors, efforts were easily terminated spasmodic attempts being nipped in the bud by the Evertonians halves, though to some extent the halves were assisted by the methods adopted by their opponents, who indulged in too much close passing and selfish dribbling to command any chance of ultimate success. The wing forwards on the home side were given every chance of distinguishing themselves, and Sharp was about the most dangerous player on the field. His speed always gave him an advantage over the opposition, while his centres at the finish were most judiciously placed, and afforded the inside men every opportunity of turning them to full advantage. At the other extremity of the line, Corrin officiated in the absence of Turner, who was not quite fit, but somehow this young player seems disinclined to let himself go and his movements create the impression that the brake is always on. He was given numberous chances of demonstrating the ability but lack of confidence and hesitancy in moving affected the left winger's play considerably. Fore and at the home side allowed superior prowess, and doubtless the acquisition of five goals led to the defenders taking matters more confortably, and indulging in risks which, in a keenly contested combat, would not have occurred the result being that the visitors placed a couple of goals to their account in the last ten minute, and thus spoiled the symmetrical record of their entertainers. The absence of Ross no doubt affected the efficiency of Meredith's play, for Harvey, who filled the inside right position, was not a great success, in fact, the whole line seemed lacking in harmony, and a wholesale infusion of dash, and vigour would have materially benefited their movements. Their passing was overdone, and in front of goal, they were dreadfully weak. The halves were the best part of the team, but the defence was not very reliable, though of course, the compulsory rearrangements in the second half spoilt everything both from a player's and spectator's point of view. The two points were very welcome to Everton, who now rank sixth in the table of results, but League prospects jus now are somewhat overshadowed of Cup-tie honours. Saturday's game afforded no clue to the possibilities of victory this weekend at Sheffield for Everton were never really extended. It would be idea to underestimate the task, which awaits the Everton brigade at Bramell Lane, for the team that can defeat Sunderland at Wearside demands considerable respect. One thing, however, appears very clear, that Everton if at the top of their present form, will not be beaten without a great struggle.

SHEFFIELD UNITED 2 EVERTON 0 (Fac game 39)
February 25 1901. The Liverpool Mercury
Quite 25,000 spectators lined the Bramell Lane enclosure on Saturday to witness the Cup tie between the above teams, which the exception of Johnson for Beers, were identical with the sides that took part in the initial round. At 3-30 the players took up their position as follow: - Everton: - Muir, goal, Balmer, and Eccles backs, Wolstenholmes, Booth, and Abbott halfbacks, Sharp, Taylor, Proudfoot, Settle (captain), and Turner forwards. Sheffield United: - Foulkes, goal, Thickett, and Boyle, backs, Johnson, Morren, and Needham (captain), halfbacks, Bennett, Field, Hedley, Priest, and Lipsham, forwards. The ground was very heavy owing to recent rains, but this defect did not appear to hamper the game, for at once the pace was brisk, and moreover well sustained. Play was exceptionally keen, and though the United were more vigorous in their methods, there was little indeed between the teams during the first 30 minutes of the game. Then Bennett took advantage of hesitancy on the part of Eccles, and put on the first goal the outcome of a free kick-and this was the only point scored up to the change of ends. Both teams started strongly, in the second half and as the game progressed the Evertonians held a slight lead. They, however, failed to make the best of their chances and after a quarter of an hour's play, Bennett again got the better of Eccles, and by a brilliant individual effort put his side further ahead. This reverse had a demoralising effect upon the visitors' subsequent play, and most of the attacking was done by the United, without however, further score, and Sheffield men won by 2 goals to nil.

EVERTON RESERVESS 3 BURY RESERVES 1
February 25 1901. The Liverpool Mercury
At Goodison Park, before 5,000 people. Bury kept pegging away, and nice passing by Booth gave Pooley a chance, and he beat Kitchen, score at half-time- Bury 1 goal, Everton nil. After ten minutes play in the second half Gray scored from a penalty. The game went all in favour of Everton, and at length Dawson drew ahead. Worthington scored before the finish. Result Bury 1 Everton 3. (Game 24) Everton: - Kitchen, goal, Halliday, and Crelly, backs, Blythe, Green, and Taylor (r), halfbacks, Roche Dawson, Worthington, Gray, and O'Brien, forwards.

SHEFFIELD UNITED V. EVERTON
Sheffield Independent - Monday 25 February 1901
Sheffield united entered the third round, and entered it in a manner which suggests that they may go further yet. The weather at Bramell Lane on Saturday was wet, and the going was heavy; but none the less the contest between United and Everton was a capital one, and United's victory by two goals to goals to none was thoroughly deserved. They played with rare spirit; the Everton goal was always in danger whenever the ball came near it; and the whole team animated by that pluck, resourcefulness, and go-ahead determation which tend more than anything else to carry a team well the front this competition. Everton often showed good form; but they missed opportunities, and lacked the dash their adversaries. It was a far better game than could have been expected under the circumstanes, and those who were not deterred by the weather from visiting Bramell lane were well rewarded. It is to be hoped that United, who have won two splendid successes in the first and sceond rounds, will maintain the high standard they have reached. If they do, the club that has tp oppose them is not to be envied.

EVERTON REVIEW
February 25 1901. The Liverpool Mercury
At Bramell-lane, Everton had a farewell to the English cup for another season. In having to tackle the “Blades” on their own ground, the Everton team was admittedly set one of the most difficult tasks in the second round of the ties for it was quite evident that the United had, judging from their surprising victory at Sunderland, in the initial stages of the tournament, determined upon making amends in the struggle for the motional trophy for the numerous failures in the League campaign. These who witnessed them overthrow Everton-who, by the by, were supposed to posses more than an outside chance for final honours. Everton started the proceedings in the presence of fully 20 spectators, and straight away the two sides went at it in ding-dong style. Considering the conditions under which, the play progressed the pace was astonishing, the accuracy of passing was marvelous, and it was quite evident that better stammer would tell a tale in the final verdict. Either side could claim no advantage, though glorious chances were missed at both goals, and half an hour passed when the home side gained the first grip of the day's honours. The respective combatants had equally maintained the high pressure, when in taking a pass from the left wing, Proudfoot was adjudged offside, the Everton centre being then on the halfway line. Little danger was anticipated from the free kick, but Boyle placed the ball well down the field to the right wing, and in the rush for possession, Bennett managed to trap the leather, and with a superb oblique drive, which flashed into the net, hit with terrific forced, placed the first goal to the credit of his side. This was a staggered for the visitors, but they returned gamely to the attack, and Taylor sent across the goalmouth a tempting centre, which only required the least touch to furshish an equalising point-but no one could reach it, and the ball travelled harmlessly over the line. Thus at the interval the Blades held the advantage of a goal, and the second moiety was awaited with increased interest. In ten minutes Everton had failed to utilise two perfect openings, and inability to turn these to account cost them the game. The first came from the right wing, where Sharp, who had been practically a spectator in the first half, received a quick pass from Booth, and, getting the better of Boyle, had a clear run into the goalmouth, but unfortunately for his side, he sprawled full length on the surface when close in, and the opportunity vanished. A few minutes later came the second chance. From a free kick the ball was lifted over the Sheffield backs and Proudfoot, dashing up before Foulkes could reach it, tried for the net. The burly custodian touched the ball with outstretched arm, and fell, and after a tremendous scrimmage under the bar, the ball was seen to be thrown over the line, presumably by the custodian. Everton plodded on, but another disaster felled their inspiration. Eccles failed to tackle Bennett, who had received a long wide pass, and, though hampered by the Everton backs, managed to get in a hard, low shot, which Muir touched, but could not prevent from entering the coveted harbour. After this the United pressed, and spendid saves by Muir avoided a heavier defeat. It must be tandidly admitted that the Everton were beaten by a superior team, and that on the day's play the United would have overcome any operation they had been pitted against. The latter were smarter on the ball than their visitors, more determined in their movements, and when near goal more dangerous in their attempts to score. For the first 30 minutes for Everton fully held their own, but the forwards could do very little with the burly methods of their opponents, who were determined either to have the ball themselves or prevent their rivals from obtaining possession. The tactics adopted by the United defenders were just of the character to upset the more orderly movements of an opposition, and Everton were brushed unceremonsly aside-or floored, for preference-without the slightest compunction. The two teams also adopted precisely opposite methods of attacks; for whereas Everton indulged in the close passing, inside game, the United halves whipped out to their wingmen at every opportunity. The Everton front rank was not seen at its best, and the extreme wings were the least effective portion of the branch of the team. Boyle invariably got the better of Sharp, and Turner did not distinguish himself at the other extremity of the line. The United halves allowed them to latitude, and as the trio had them fairly well in hand throughout the afternoon it remained with the opposing halfbacks division to neutralise these movements, and also the deficiencies of their own attacking forces. Hence the Everton half back division had to bear the front of the struggle, and right manfully did they preform their part of the day's work. But those harassing methods in which they invariably indulge when each department is bearing the fair share of the work were conspicuously absent, for the sole reason aforementioned, and their best efforts were employed in defence. Each man played a capital game, but further behind the full backs were not as sound as usual, and both goals scored by the Blades would doubtless, under ordinary circumstances, have been easily prevented. The United, however, missed no chance, and in this particular they did excel. Muir gave a capital display in goal, but the second part scored against him seemed to present no particular difficulty though the ball came along the ground at a very acute angle. On the United side, the defence was impervious, Foulkes making one wonderful save, whilst the backs by their forcible tactics, broke up the Everton combination, and their accurate and powerful returns were always in evidence. The halves likewise, were stubborn, and required some beating. Needham giving a capital exhibition, though Morren was not one whit behind in ability, and Johnson was a rare worker. In the front rank the home side could claim a district advantage. The extreme wings were a most dangerous couple, and whenever Bennett go the ball there was danger lurking ahead, the old Mexborough player scoring both goals. But even this marked success did not appear to cause the right winger much satisfaction, judging from his countenances. Lipsham ran and centred splendidly in the earlier stages, but Wolstenholmes stuck to him well, and to a great extent destroyed the keenest of this part of the Blades attack. In being beaten, Everton have the satisfaction of knowing that they played a good game, one which, in the majority of cases, would have been sufficient to provident them with a victory. They were fully equal to the high pressure and rapid pace of the first half, and had they equaklised when the chances came, the result might easily have been reversed. The United proved stubborn and determined opponents, dashing in every movement, and of a granite-like nature in defence, qualities, which would have tested the best team in the country to the utmost. With everything depending upon the game, as in a Cup-tie tactics similar to those adopted by the Blades are almost guarantee of victory, and Everton were not clever enough to circumvent by deft footwork the vigous methods of their opponents. Hence their defeat.