September - April 1884-85

Season 1884-85 Everton v Burslem Port Vale
September 15 1884. The Liverpool Courier.
This match, on Saturday, was made the occasion of opening the Port Vale Football, Athletic, and Recreation Grounds at Moorland-road Burslem, and the weather being delightfully fine, the visit of the Liverpool cupholders excited considerable interest in the district, there being on the ground close upon 3,000 people during the course of the afternoon, while the splendid new stand, which has been erected at a cost of £600, was well patronised. The previous matches between the clubs were extremely well and closely contested, and in order to maintain their advantage on the present occasion the Vale had secured the services of a strong team, which was strengthened by new accessions from Wolverhampton and West Bromwich. Everton, on the contrary, having suffered from the loss of their ground, and the facilities for practice, were not prepared for a fast game such as was played by the smart young Staffordshire club, and being destitute of “conditions” suffered a very severe defeat. Reynolds, the Vale captain, won the choice of ends and elected to defend the goal on the higher ground, by which he secured a slight advantage in the oblique breeze, which traversed the field of play. At 3-15 the Everton captain put foot to the ball, which was immediately taken possession of by the Port Vale left, when from the briefest of scrimmage Watson forced the sphere between the visitors' upright and scored the first goal for his side. Flushed with this early and unlooked-for success, a further strong attack was initiated, the danger of which was staved off by Preston, when Gibson, Higgins, and McGill became prominent in the centre, and joining issue with whom, Reynolds was of great service to his side, whilst for Everton “Scott” replied with a fine run on the right, which was checked by the opposing backs. Then the Vale right-wing pair, in conjunction with the centre, went away in beautiful combination. Lindsay in goal, however, saved admirably, which elicited an artistic touch from Payne, a goal-kick eventually being conceded. A moment later Hood centred very finely, but the opportunity was not utilsed to advantage, and as a consequence, the Liverpool cupholders gained a footing at the Port Vale corner. The venue of play being promptly removed, Marriott temporarily checked Davis and Hood, although a moment later Lindsay was fisting out the ball with great vigour, and it was entirely due to the young goalkeeper's energy and skill that his charge remained intact. This having been accomplished, Whittle, Preston, and Higgins became prominent in a passing movement, which forced the play well within the home section of the ground, and in addition to those named Horton and “Scott” were playing well for their respective sides. Parry subsequently had a shot at the home citadel, and for a time Rowley the home custodian was closely pressed until the ball was got away. The game now became very fast, but notwithstanding some really fine play on the part of Poulson and Payne –the latter of whom shone conspicuously –the Vale up to half-time gained no further advantage, Higgins was the recipient of impartial applause, as was also J. Horton, who at full back rendered invaluable service to his side. Following the change of ends the play developed a series of disasters for the visitors, whose want of condition and combination told greatly against them, characteristics which, however, were seen to prefection in the eleven so ably captained by Mr. Reynolds. By this time the wind had veered round a few points, and still gave the Vale assistance. When the captain restarted the ball, an attack, was at once made upon the Everton uprights, and notwithstanding some good head-play by Marriott (who about this time was hurt) and Grant, Payne placed a remarkably neat goal within a couple of minutes from the recommencement of the game. A little later, the ball was again taken up, and for the second time Payne administered the coup de grace ; while a moment later a fourth goal was scored from the foot of Davis. It was now self-evident that the Lancastrians were played out, whilst the most conspicuous figure among the “cardinal and blue” division was Payne, who throughout played a surprisingly good game. In a little while Watson scored a fifth goal when for a brief space the Evertonians rallied and bore somewhat heavily on the Vale left, which was held by Davis and Hood. Rarely fifteen minutes from the call of time Reynolds secured possession and registered the sixth goal amidst applauses. Subsequently McGill made a magnificent run, but Gibson was luckless in a grand shot at goal, as the ball struck the post heavily, and rebounding into play was hurried off to the opposite end, where Payne delivered another attack with fatal effect, this being the player's third success during the game. A little later Rowley made a mistake, which nearly gave Everton an ardently wished goal, but on the whole the Vale goalkeeper acquitted himself most satisfactorily. From now to the call of time no further points were scored, and thus victory remained with the home team by seven to nil. Payne was by far the best forward on the field, whilst for the losing side Preston, Marriott, Gibson, and Parry struggled hard to lesson the crushing defeat. The following are the teams; - Everton; - C. Lindsay, goal; T. Marriott and W. Parry, backs; J. Preston, and J. Grant, half-backs; W. Richards, and D. Scott, right wing; J. McGill (captain), and J. Whittle, centre; M. Higgins, And W. Gibson, left-wing. Port Vale; - W. Rowley, goal; R. Dain and J. Horton, backs; W. Poulston, C. Simpson, and E. Horton, half-backs; R. Davis, and E. Hood, left-wing; W. Reynolds (captain), centre; A. Watson, and E. Payne, right wing; Umpires Messrs, F. Brittell and Alcock; referee Mr. Oliver, Stoke-on Trent. At the conclusion of the match the visiting team and friends were most hospitably entertained.

EVERTON V PORT VALE
September 15, 1884. The Liverpool Mercury.
The holders of the Liverpool and District Challenge Cup journeyed to Shaffordshire on Saturday, and met the Port Vale team at Burslem before 2000 spectators, the occasion being the opening of a new ground by the Shaffordshire Club. The home team, who had the best of the game throughout, scored one goal in the first half, but in the second portion of the contest had matters pretty much their own way, and added six more goals to their total. Wanting conditions told severely on the visitors, who had not all their expected team. Sides:- Everton:- C.M. Lindsay, goal; W. Parry, and T. Marriott, backs; J.Preston, and Grant, half-backs; W. Richards, Stott, J. McGill, M. Higgins, Whittle, and W. Gibson, forwards. Port Vale: - Rowley, goal; Dain and Horton, backs; Poulston, Simpson, and E. Horton, half-backs; Davis, Hood, Reynolds, Watson, and Payne, forwards.

Liverpool & District Association
September 17 th 1884. The Liverpool Courier.
At a committee meeting of this association held on Monday night, the draw for the first round of ties in the Challenge Cup competition resulted as follows; - Birkenhead Argyle v Earlestown; St. Peters v Stanley; Everton (the present holders) v Toxteth Wanderers; St. George's v St. Benedict's. Birkenhead v Liverpool Ramblers; Liverpool Liver v St. Mary's; Anfield v Skelmersdale; Earlestown Wanderers v Liverpool Linden; Liverpool Rovers v Bootle Wanderers; Liverpool Cambrian v Haydock Temperance; Tranmere v Burscough; Southport Hyde Park v Southport; Bootle v Haydock St. James; The ties are to be played off on or before November 8 th , the club first-named in each instance having choice of ground.

Association
September 20 th 1884. The Liverpool Courier
The Lancashire cup draw, was made, and needless surprise has been expressed at Everton, the holders of the Liverpool Cup declining to enter a contest wherein amateurs have not the remotes chance of success; but in thus resolving the committee acted more discreetly than many clubs whose only aim to “hook a big fish” in the first round of ties in the hope of obtaining a substantial profit from “the gate” should they also be fortunate enough to secure choice of grounds. Hereabouts grounds are becoming more difficult of access year by year, and from present appearances it is evident the day is not far distant when football, in common with other pastimes, will be confined to the public parks. Even Everton, the Liverpool cupholders, found themselves homeless at the commencement of the season, but were fortunate in securing temporary possession of a building site in Anfield-road, which is being enclosed at considerable cost. The ground is easy of access, being in close proximity to the “Sandon,” the headquarters of the club; and as it admirably suited to the pastimes, it will doubtless be the most popular of our local grounds during the winter months. Through the kindness of Mr. F. Brettell, hon.secretary, we have been favoured with an advance copy of the Everton fixtures. Today the cupholders will commence play in the home district with the newly formed Wallasea club, at Seaview-road, Liscard, the latter being reinforced by members of the Ramblers and Bootle clubs. With the exception of Morris, who retires, the team will be much the same as last season. Morris, however, will be a great loss at back, and the only player at all capable of filling the position is McGill, who showed some excellent qualities while temporarily occupying the position at Burslem a week ago. If Everton can secure a competent centre-forward, the team will be quite as strong as it was a year ago. In Gunn, Everton has got a promising youth, who, although in his novitiate, can kick and tackle well, and if he has the good sense to stick to the game, bids fair to distinguish himself. The season's list is far in advance of any previous compilation, being altogether of a more ambitious character. In addition to a renewal of old fixtures, matches have been made with the Bolton Association, the Blackburn Rovers “A” team, Dumbarton, Darwen Old Wanderers, and one or two other clubs of note. The new ground will be opened on Saturday next, when the cupholders will meet their old opponents Earlestown, with whom, it will be remembered, a most exciting match was last season played for the possession of the handsome silver challenge trophy offered for competition by the Liverpool and District Association.

EVERTON V WALLASEY DISTRICT
September 22, 1884. The Liverpool Mercury.
The above match was played on Saturday at New Brighton, and resulted, after a most enjoyable and pleasant game in a decided win for Everton by five goals to one. Everton won the toss and elected to play with the sun at their backs. Heron started the ball, and Gibson became prominent by a good shot at goal shortly after, but W. Richards by a splendid show drew first blood for Everton. Berry directly after obtained another goal by his head. Everton up to now had kept their opponents pretty well to their own quarters, and from a pretty pass McGill scored the third goal. The game, however, became more open now, and Dempsey and Raynor, of the Liverpool Rambers, were very busy, and very often had hard lines. Upon change of ends Everton at once became busy, especially the right wing. Marriott by a hugh kick sent the ball to Higgins, who passed it, after a smart ran, to McGill and enabled him to shoot a fine goal (No.4). From the kick-off Morris got held and sent the ball into the mouth of goal, and D.H. Williams registered the fifth goal, but this was followed directly after by a goal for Wallasey District by Heron. Teams:- Everton:- C.M. Lindsay, goal; R. W. Morris, and T. Marriott, backs; W. H. Parry (captain), and J.Preston, half-backs; E. Berry, J. McGill, W. Gibson, W. Richards, D.H. Williams, M. Higgins, forwards. Wallasey District:- H. Harding. Goal; R. Eshrigge, and J. R. Marston, backs; W. Bowing, F. Owen, and H.N. Bewley, half-backs; W. Raynor, W. Heron, W. Turner, H. Dempsey, Quilliam.

Everton v Wallasea District
September 22 nd 1884. The Liverpool Courier.
The Liverpool cupholders were pitted against a team representing the new organisation of Wallasea District on Saturday. The ground of the New Brighton Club at Liscard was requisitioned for the contest, but the match excited very little interest, as, despite the splendid weather, only a couple of hundred people were present. As soon as the ball was set in motion the home team were forced to defend their goal. Harding clearing a good shot. Owen and Newton gave temporary relief, which was neutralised by Preston and the Everton right, and Wallasea were pressed for some minutes. After play had proceeded a quarter of an hour Rayner was permitted to join the home ranks vice Newton and he at once made his presence felt by a rush down the left wing followed by three unsuccessful shots at goal, the wary Lindsay being equal to the emergency. The game proceeded on pretty equal terms, Everton meanwhile displaying better combination. Harding was called upon to save shots from Higgins and McGill, and then Richards, Williams, and McGill took the ball along in a nice movement, which resulted in the former-scoring the first goal, which was followed almost immediately by one from Parry. Continuing to pen Wallasea, Everton notched a third point a little later, this time at the hands of McGill. Nothing further resulted until changing over, and after Lindsay had cleared a shot on re-starting, Everton swarmed their opponents quarters, but disaster was ably staved off until McGill found an opening. Rayner, Dempsey Owen, and Quilliam made creditable but futile efforts to improve matters, but the visitors were very active, and a fifth goal ensured, a pass from Higgins enabling Williams to beat Harding. Gallant struggles were made by Wallasea, and at length they were rewarded with a goal through Dempsey and Raynor going off with a rush and the latter screwing across to Hetron who got the ball well out of the reach of Lindsay. This was the last point made, and Everton won by five goals to one. Teams; - Everton; - Lindsay, goal; T. Marriott and R. W. Morris, backs; W. H. Parry, and G. Preston, half-backs; E. Berry W. Richards, D. H. Williams, J. McGill, W. Gibson, and M. Higgins, forwards. Wallasea; - H. Harding, goal; R. B. Eskrigge, and J.B. Marston, backs; H. Bewley, W. Browning, and F. Owen, half-backs; W. Rayner, H. Dempsey, W. A. Herron, -Quilliam, and W. Turner, forwards.

Association game
September 27 th 1884. The Liverpool District
The meeting of Everton and Earlestown today at the new ground of the former. Walton Breck road, is an item of great interest in local football circles, as the clubs were respectively the winners and runners up for the Liverpool and District Challenge Cup last season. Unfortunately however, the silver medallists (Earlestown) will not be fully represented, and will therefore entrust their fortunes to the following team; - J. Appleton, goal; Robert green and J. Green, backs; James Duxbury and Richard Howker, half-backs; H. Holcroft, W. Rich, J. Elliosn, J. Whalley, Harrison, and T. Ferguson. The Everton team will be as follows; - Lindsay goal; Pickering and Parry, backs; Preston and Higgins, half-backs; McGill, Whittle, Gibson, Williams, Barry, and Richards, Referee H. Bailey, Liverpool Ramblers.

EVERTON V EARLESTOWN
September 29, 1884. The Liverpool Mercury
These clubs met on Saturday and played off their first fixture for the season at the new ground of the former, between Breckfield-road North and Anfield-road, and after part of the day proving favouritable there was an attendance of over 1000 spectators. The Everton captain won the toss and taking advantage of a cross breeze, played up the ball during the first portion of the game. Ellison having kicked off on behalf of the visitors the ball was rushed down to the lower ground.. Its stay here, however, was of brief duration, for shortly afterwards Gibson had a shot at the Earlestown upright. Following up the attack Richards crossed over to Higgins, who were fortunate that his colleagues scored the first goal for the home side. The ball had not long been restarted when Gibson gained possession and within ten minutes from the commencement of the game scored the second goal. Succeeding this event there was a long spell of more even play, in which Everton always had the best of the game, and before half-time was reached Whittle was instructmental in scoring a third goal. On changing ends the play at once converged on the Earlestown stronghold and after a brief siege Richards reduced the visitors' stronghold amid applause. The defeat of Earlestown was now inevitable, but still the visitors strove hard to earn a point, but without success. During the last quarter of the hour Everton completely earned the upper hand and were almost constantly in the vincity of their opponents goal which although well defended, was again reduced by Whittle who scored the fifth and last goal and thus the game terminated by five goals to nil, after affairly well played game, considering the state of the ground. Teams:- Everton:- Joliffe, goal; J. McGill and J. Pickering, backs; J. Preston, and W. Parry,(captain), half-backs; Berry, Richard, Whittle, Finley, and Gibson, forwards. Earlestown: - Appleton, goal; R. Green and J. Green, backs; Duxbury, Barker, and Whalley, (captain), half-backs; Holcroft, Ride, Ellison, Harrison, and Ferguson, forwards.

EVERTON V EARLESTOWN (SECOND ELEVENS)
September 29, 1884. The Liverpool Mercury.
This match was played at Earlestown on Saturday, and resulted, after a very stiff game in a win for Everton by five goals to three. The goals for Everton were obtained by Scott (2), Richards (1), Williams (1), and Sinnott (1). Teams:- Everton:- W. Owens, goal; R. H. Richards (captain) and T. Newton, backs; J. Sinnott, J. Douglas, and T. Mowbray, half-backs; T. Scott, Williams, J. Richards, W. Brown, and W.F. Evens, forwards. Earlestown:- J. Clegg, goal (captain), goal; A. Clayton, and J. Plant, backs; T. Fairclough, A. Wootton, half-backs; J. Simms, H. Rich, J. Appleton, J. Pennington, W. Blair, and W. Thompson, forwards.

Everton v Earlestown
September 29 th 1884. The Liverpool Courier.
The holders and runners up for the silver challenge trophy of the Liverpool and District Association met on Saturday to open the new ground of the Everton club, Walton Breck road, which has been enclosed at considerable expense. The weather fortunately turned out favourable, and in anticipation of a good game, there was an excellent muster of spectators, about a thousand being present. The ground having but quite recently acquired, was not in as good condition as it will presumably be made, and as a consequence the play of last season's leading clubs was not as artistic as the meeting of the teams gave reason to expect. Parry having secured the choice of goals, preferred to play uphill during the first period of the game, and this had the advantage of a strongish breeze which obliquently traversed the ground. At 3 50 Ellison started the ball, which was at once hurried away to the lower ground. The visitors were speedily dislodged, and Higgins having put in a “header” at the centre, Rich led a second advance, which was peremptorily checked on a claim for “hands” by Everton being sustained. This brought about an immediate attack on the Earlestown citadel, at which Gibson levelled an unsuccessful shot. A moment later however, Higgins, who was displaying much activity, had the ball passed to him by Richards, and applying the left, scored the first goal, just five minutes from the commencement of the game. Still pressing their opponents closely, corner-kicks fell to Everton, but although the Earlestwon eventually broke away, the Everton captain cleared his lines grandly, and on the sphere being again transferred upfield, Gibson, with a quick shot, lowered the colours of the silver medalists for the second time, this happening barely ten minutes from the start. Following this inspiriting success, Richards became prominent, but although the finesse of this player was very fine, his final shot passed wide of the mark. Again, in close sequence the ball was gyrating violently in the mouth of the Earlestown goal, being finally fisted out by the hardly-pressed custodian. Having starved off the danger, the play for several minutes became of a much even character, but in the main Everton had the best of the situation, the safe play of the home backs relieving Joliffe, the custodian of even the slightest anxiety. Later on the Earlestown men were enabled to make a threatening raid, and must have scored but for Preston's smartness. Although the visitors were now working with greater cohesion and energy, Everton again reached the upper ground, when from a left pass by Higgins to Whittle, the latter scored a third goal for the elated cupholders, this being the concluding point up to half-time. On Whittle restarting the ball, the play at once converged on the Earlestown uprights, but although a shot by Higgins passed outside, Richards, with admirable tact, succeeded in forcing the ball through from the right, a fourth goal thereby accruing. It was now quite evident that Earlestown would be decisively beaten, yet the visitors strove manfully, but without success, to score a point, so as to lesson the sting of defeat. This, owing to the Everton backs taking up a too-forward positions, at one time appeared possible, but the opportunity was lost through indiscreet dalliance with the ball. The Evertonians lost no time in regaining their ascendancy, and obtaining a throw-in near the corner flag, Whittle scored the fifth and last goal for his side. Subsequently, Ferguson made a strenuous effort to retrieve the fortunes of the visitors, but a fast and brilliant run was rendered abortive through want of adequate support. Towards the close of the game the cupholders played up very spiritedly in the hope of increasing their advantage, but although shots were made by Berry and Gibson they passed harmlessly outside, yet a high one by the latter was within an ace of taking effect. The Earlestown men were outplayed from the start, and suffered defeat by five goals to nothing. Whittle, in the Everton, gave promise of becoming a useful accession to the premier club, while McGill at back, when he has overcome a too risky desire to get in advance of his position, will show to great advantage. Teams; - Everton; - C. Joliffe, goal; J. McGill and J. Pickering, backs; J. Preston and WE. H. Parry, half-backs; E. Berry, and W. Richards, right wing; J. Whittle, and W. Finlay, centre, M. Higgins, and W. Gibson, left wing umpire Mr. Gunning. Earlestown; - J. Appleton, goal, R. Green and J. Green, backs; J. Duxbury, R. Bowker and J. Whalley (captain), half-backs; H. Holcroft, and W. Rich, right wing; J. Ellison, centre, J. Harrison, and J. Ferguson, left wing; umpire Mr. P. Hasty, Referee Mr. H. A. Bailey Liverpool Ramblers.

Everton v Earlestown (2d teams)
Played on Saturday at Earlestown, and resulted in a win for Everton by five goals to three. These were obtained by Scott (2), Richards, Williams, and Sinnott. The game was very evenly contested, but the decisions were not altogether of a satisfactory character. Teams; - Everton; - W. Owens, goal, H. R. Richards (captain), T. Newton, J. Douglas, J. Sinnott, T. Mowbray, T. Scott, W. Brown, W. Williams, W. F. Evans, and J. Richards. Earlestown; - J. Grey (captain), A. Clayton, J. Plant, F. Fairclough, A. Wootton, J. Simms, W. Blair, J. Pennington, H. Richs, J. Appleton, and W. Thompson.

Association Game
October 4 th 1884. The Liverpool Courier.
Everton, the holders of the Liverpool cup, opened their new ground at Anfield on Saturday in a match with their old opponents, Earlestown, the runners up for last season's trophy. Neither team was as strong as it might have been, but undoubtedly the greatest suffer of the two was Earlestown although the cup-holders were experimenting in the matter of position. McGill played back –or rather betwixt and between -with Pickering, and Whittle (who is a recent accession) played centre with Finlay. The bulk of the centre forward work devolved upon Whittle, who played sufficiently well to warrant the hope that the young player will have further chances afforded him. Finlay was not nearly so satisfactory as his colleagues, and evidently lacks “go” when opposed by a resolute set of forwards. Conjointly with a good “gate” Everton had all the best of the game, and won by five goals to nothing, the hollowness of the contest furnishings an odd contrast to the fine exhibition given by Earlestown in the final tie of last season's competition. The following players from Everton have been selected to represent Liverpool and District in the opening match of the season with the Walsall Association, at Walsall on Saturday next. C. M. Lindsay, goal; T. Marriott (backs) and Higgins (Forward) (Note none played)
Today's matches
Everton “A” team v Southport Wanderers at Anfield.

October 11 th 1884. The Liverpool Courier.
Everton have an important engagement on the home ground at Walton Breck road, with the Bolton Association, and as the cupholders have lately gone to much expense in enclosing their ground they are naturally anxious to meet their liabilities at the earliest opportunity.
Today's matches
Everton v Bolton Association. at Walton Breck road
Ormskirk v Everton 2d team, at Ormskirk.

EVERTON V BOLTON ASSOCIATION
October 13, 1884. The Liverpool Mercury.
This match was played at the new enclosure of the Everton F.C. at Walton Breck-road, Liverpool on Saturday, before a large number of spectators. The Liverpool cupholders had all the best of the play, and by the time the teams changed ends had 3 goals to their credit. Upon resuming, the fortunes of the game were still in favour of Everton, who never played a better game, and left the field victors by 6 goals to nil three being scored by McGill 2, by Whittle and the remaining 1 by Higgins. Teams:- Everton:- C.M. Lindsay, goal; T. Marriott and R.W. Morris, backs; J. Preston, J. Pickering, and W. Parry, half-backs; J. Whittle, Richards, J. McGill, M. Higgins, and W. Gibson, forwards. Bolton Association; Kelly, goal; Sheppard and Riding, backs; Parkinson, Lee, and Kelly, half-backs; Mortimer, Scrowcroft, Parkinson, Rigby, and Mann, forwards.

Everton v Bolton Association
October 13 th 1884. The Liverpool Courier.
This match was played on Saturday on the new enclosure of the Everton Football Club Walton Breck-road, in the presence of a large number of spectators. Parry winning the toss, elected to play with the sun at his back, but against a strong breeze Scrowcroft kicked off, and the Higgins, with the help of Gibson made a quick run up the left; but being dispossed by Shepherd, Scowcroft (late of Bolton Wanderers) raced off towards the Everton goal, and passing Parry was preparing to shoot when Morris by a hugh kick gave Higgins possession, and passing nicely to McGill got up near the Bolton goal, McGill's attack being feebly met, a scrimmage was formed in the very mouth of the Bolton goal, and after an arduous struggle Higgins found an opening and drew first blood, shortly after the start. By the good play of Parkinson and Sheppard the Everton were now kept at bay, and a terrific “bully” occurred in front of the Everton goal, but fortune favoured the cup-holders, and the lines were cleared by Morris. Preston next become conspicuous by his brilliant play. He and Parry admirably “fed” the forwards who, headed by McGill, made a sudden raid upon the opponents fortress, which in a short time McGill reduced with a clinking shot. The Play now became rather one-sided until, from a centre by Higgins, McGill scored again, the game at half-time standing three goals to nil in favour of Everton. Play having recommenced Scowcroft led off with a beautiful dribble, but was stopped by Morris, and Preston sent the ball flying over to Richards and Whittle who at once went off at full speed, but although a corner was secured, the advantage was not improved. Again the Everton forwards sweeped down upon Kelly, Shepherd and Riding who repulsed the attack, but not for long for the old “Black Watch” were not to be denied, and Whittle scored goal No 4. Shortly afterwards McGill scored the fifth goal, and before time was called Whittle had able also registered another. The game, which was fast and exciting, terminated as above stated in a decided win for Everton by six goals to nil. Teams; - Everton; - C.M. Lindsay, goal; T. Marriott, and R. W. Morris, backs; J. Preston, J. Pickering, and W. Parry (captain), half-backs; Whittle, Richards, McGill, Higgins, and Gibson, forwards. Bolton Association; - Kelly, goal; Shepperd, and Riding backs; Parkinson, Lee, and Kelly, Half-backs; Mortimor, Scowcroft, Rigby, and Man, forwards. Referee Mr. J. Richards.

October 18 th 1884. The Liverpool Courier.
Everton were engaged in the congenial task of lowering the colours of the Bolton Association and this was accomplished so effectively that at the close of the game, the Liverpool cupholders, who showed greatly improved form, and were besides, favoured with the assistance of Morris scored a bloodless victory of six goals.
Today's games.
Everton v Port Vale, at Burslem
Everton 2d team v Liver at Stanley Park.

Everton (“A” team) v Warrington
October 20 th 1884. The Liverpool Courier.
This match was played at Anfield on Saturday, in the presence of a fair muster of onlookers, and resulted after an uninteresting game in a win for Everton by six goals to love. If the forwards of the Everton had played better the score ought to have been doubled. The goals were obtained by Scott, one, W. Williams, two, Finlay, two, and Brown, one. Although Scott only obtained one goal, still he was the best man on the field.

Everton (2d team) v Liver
Played at Stanley on Saturday. The Everton had a very poor team on paper, but at the last moment, through the canceling of the Burslem match, the services of Higgins and Lindsay were obtained. With the help of these two players, and the good play of McGoldrick, Croasdell, and Walters, Everton soon notched four goals, all obtained by McGoldrick. The Liver soon afterwards got a very easy goal and the game terminated as above.

October 25 th 1884. The Liverpool Courier.
Today Everton play off their first round tie with Toxteth Wanderers in their new ground at Anfield, and although the cupholders may not have the services of Whittle who is under a sort of pledge to his old club. Still their should score an easy victory. W. Richards will play to day for the Liverpool District against Cheshire Association on their Bootle Cricket-field, at Hawthorne road today.

EVERTON (A TEAM) V WARRINGTON (FIRST TEAM)
October 20, 1844. The Liverpool Mercury.
This match was played at Anfield on Saturday last, and resulted after an uninteresting game, a win for the “A” team by six goals to love. The goals were obtained by Scott 1, W. Williams 2, Finlay 2, and Brown 1. Although Scott only obtained one goal, still he was the means of other players obtaining points, and was the best man upon the field. Team: - Everton, Jackson, goal; Marritt and Richards, backs; Cartwright, McWbray, Finlay, Strangewats, half-backs; Brown, Scott, D. Williams, W. Williams. Warrington: - Webster, goal; Davies and W. Dillion, backs; Parker, Royston, Walton, half-backs; Matthews, Young, Warren and E. Dillon, forwards.

EVERTON (SECOND TEAM) V LIVERPOOL
October 20, 1884. The Liverpool Mercury
This match was played on Saturday, at Stanley Park and resulted in an easy victory for Everton by four goals to one. The goals for Everton were obtained by McGoldrick, who played a dashing game. The play of Croadsdell also indicates that he will be a good man. Whiting and Smith played best for Liverpool, and Powell kicked the goal. Teams;- Everton:- E. Fitzgerald, goal; F. Brettle and S Walton, backs; T Pickup, W. Croadsdell, G. Rowson, half-backs; M. Higgins, C. Lindsay, John, Douglas (captain), C. McGoldrick, and W. Hampton, forwards. Liverpool:- W. Parratt, goal; T. Smith and F. Dickinson, backs; J. Dewis, W. Dewis, and W. Wilson, half-backs; G. Powell, J. Brown, T. Smith, F. Luke, and H. Whiting, forwards.

Everton v Toxteth Wanderers
October 27 th 1884. The Liverpool Courier.
This first round cup-tie, in the Liverpool and district competition, was played at Anfield on Saturday, in the presence of over 300 spectators. The Wanderers obtained the choice of ends, and played with a strong wind at their backs. McGill kicked off, and after a bit of loose play the old Ranger fastened on to the ball, and passed to the left with success. Higgins sent in a beautiful screw kick, which W. Richards scored the first goal for the cup-holders. After the kick-off, the right wing became prominent, and at length from a combined rush of the Everton forwards, W. Richards, after doing a rare hit of dodging scored goal No 2. This was directly afterwards followed by another from the foot of Pickering. The Wanderers, who were still playing hard, now carried the ball up field, and for a time gave Morris and Marriott plenty of work, and eventually Morris by a tremendous kick, gave the ball to Higgins who with Gibson ran down the left enabling the latter to try a hard shot at goal, which was successful. After half-time the Wanderers slackened down considerably and near the end of the game they seemed quite exhausted. The Everton men now played harder than ever, and from a beautiful screw by Richards, Higgins, headed the fifth goal. Some time elapsed before another goal was scored, and as it was getting dark the interest in the game decreased; but Gibson, who played a much better game than usual, scored twice before time, but making the Everton total to seven goals to nil. Teams; - Everton; - C. M. Lindsay, goal; T. Marriott and R. W. Morris, backs; W. Parry (captain), J. Preston, and J. Pickering, half-backs; W. Richards, W. Williams, J. McGill, M. Higgins, and W. Gibson. Forwards. Toxteth Wanderers; - R. Peterson, goal; D. Deffon and J. Roberts, backs; W. Bennett, C. Polhill, and C. Crooks, half-backs; M. Walker, T. Woosey, J. Hendry, W. Henry, and H. Williams, forwards.

Tranmere v Everton (2d team)
This match resulted in a draw –two goals each.

EVERTON V TOXTETH WANDERERS
October 27, 1884. The Liverpool Mercury
This match, a first tie in the Liverpool and District Association Cup-tie, was played on the ground of the former, Anfield-road, and resulted in a victory for Everton by seven goals to nil. The goals were got by Richards (2), Gibson (3), Higgins (1), and Pickering (1), while Parry, the captain played in grand style.
Everton v Tranmere (second Teams)
Played at Tranmere on Saturday, and resulted in a draw of two goals each.

Bootle v Everton
November 3 rd 1884. The Liverpool Courier.
This match was played on Saturday on the ground of the former Hawthorn road, Bootle, in the presence of 1,500 to 2,000 spectators. Bootle winning the toss decided to commence with the wind in their favour. The play on both sides was pretty even, and at half time neither side had scored, good runs having been made by Eyton-Jones, Woods, Gibson, and Higgins. On resuming, Everton at once assumed the aggressive and pressed their opponents severely. Parry having given McGill possession, the latter raced off towards the Bootle goal, but was intercepted by Sloan, but Scott lying close by, was enabled to score the first goal for Everton. Shortly afterwards the Bootle right wing made tracks for the Everton goal, but Preston prevented mischief beyond a corner kick, which was unproductive. Morris kicked off, and gave Gibson the sphere who, dribbling a short distance, passed to Higgins, which player centred to McGill, who again essayed to shoot, but was baulked by Sloan, but not to be outdone, the Everton got his foot round his opponent, and skillfully shot at goal. This double reverse considerable damped the ardour of the Bootle players, but they gathered themselves together, and by the help of Rogers, Woods, and Eyton-Jones, made a terrific onslaught on the Everton goal, but nothing resulted. Shortly afterwards George tried a shot, but being unsuccessful, Morris and Preston helped the ball down the field, Dixon, by a hugh kick now gave Eyton-Jones possession, who shot the ball in the mouth of goal, Lindsay partially cleared his lines, and unfortunately for Everton, Parry, who had played with great judgement throughout, made a mistake and Greyson running up touched the ball through just as the whistle called for a final whistle. Thus after the best game played in this district for sometime, Everton were declared the winners by two goals to one. Teams; - Everton; - G. M. Lindsay, goal; T. Marriott and R. W. Morris, backs; J. Pickering, W. H. parry (captain), and Preston, half-backs; W. Richards, T. Scott, J. McGill, W. Gibson, and M. Higgins, forwards. Bootle; - W. Jackson, goal; R. M. Sloan, and C. Evans, backs, J. W. C Rogers (captain), C. Allsop, and D. Dixon, half-backs; J. A. Eyton-Jones, F. Woods, J. E. Grayson, W. George, and D. Wilson, forwards. Referee Mr. Manners, Welsh Association.

Bootle v Everton (2d teams)
These teams met at Anfield on Saturday, and exciting interest placed in the district. The Evertonians ran round their opponents, and won easily by six goals to nil. For the winners A. Gunn, W. Brown and W. Finlay played exceedingly well, and the most prominent player for Bootle was Patterson.

EVERTON V BOOTLE
November 3, 1884. The Liverpool Mercury.
The first this season between these clubs was played on Saturday, at Bootle and as they are both engaged in the Liverpool and District Association cup, Everton being the present holders, great interest was taken in the event. The weather being fine, there was a large attendance. At 3-20 Garyson kick-off, but the ball was soon taken into Bootle ground, and Preston made a good attempt at goal, but failed. After some pretty even play, F woods, and George passed the ball up to the goal, but Gibson got possession, and passed to McGill, who shot for goal, but failed. The game now became pretty fast, and he passed to and fro, Everton goal, but Gibson got possession, and passed to McGill, who shot for goal, but failed. The game now became pretty fast, and the ball passed to and fro, Everton having the advantage, when Gibson passed to Higgins, who charged at goal, but without success. The ball was now travlled down the field, and F. Woods passed to Eyton-Jones, but the latter made a bad kick. Eyton-Jones again got possession and passed to George, who made a free kick from the corner, but without any result. After half-an-hours play, Bootle got the first corner, but nothing came of it. Some fine play now took place in the Booth quarters, and Higgins and Gibson passed well, but Rogers with a “header” sent the ball down the field. Half-time was now called, neither side having scored. McGill kick-off, but the ball was soon returned, and George and F. Woods played a good game, after which the ball was again taken to the Bootle ground, and Higgins made an unsuccessful kick at goal. Eyton-Jones now took the leather along and passed to George and F. Woods, and Rogers made a good kick, but too high. The ball now travelled towards the Bootle goal, and after some passing between Scott and McGill the former found an opening and scored the first point, 20 minutes after half-time. Play now became brisk, chiefly in the vincity of the Booth quarters, but Sloane kept the ball off. Scott made a fine shot at goal, but Jackson handled it out. After some even and at times pretty rough play, Scott passed to McGill, who put the leather through. Nothing particularly accrued until just before time, when after a scrimmage in the vicinity of the Everton goal, Williams with a low kick, succeeded in eluding the Everton's goalkeeper, the game ending in favour of Everton by two goals to one. Teams:- Everton:- C.M. Lindsay, goal; T. Marriott and R.W. Morris, backs; J. Pickering, W.H. Parry (captain), and J. Preston, half-backs; W. Richards, T. Scott, right wing; J. McGill, centre; W. Gibson, and M. Higgins, left wing; Bootle:- W. Jackson, goal; R.M. Sloane, and J. Rogers (captain), backs; W. George, and D. Williams, right wing; J. Grayson, centre, A. Eyton-Jones and F. Woods, left wing. Mr. Manners, referee.

EVERTON-BOOTLE (SECOND TEAMS)
November 3, 1884. The Liverpool Mercury
This match, which is looked upon by the second teams as being important as the first team match, was played at Anfield on Saturday last. Bootle at first showed signs of winning, but afterwards fell to pieces and were defeated by six goals to nil. Brown, was a tower of strength for Everton while Finlay, A. Gunn and E. Gunn also played well. Patterson played a good game for Bootle. November 8 th 1884. The Liverpool Courier. How great local interest now is in the Association game was shown on Saturday on the occasion of the meeting of Bootle and Everton. Upwards of a thousand spectators passed the “gate,” and in addition to these there was an outside crowd of like proportions all attracted by the prospect of witnessing a good game. The play, indeed, was of the highest order. There were few mistakes, but unfortunately for the ex-cupholders the preponderance was on their side, and this cost them the loss of the game. They more than held their own against the Everton forwards, which latterly have been subjected to much changes, but the Everton backs were as solid as a rock. It is acknowledged on all hands that they played a splendid game, and to them the popular voice ascribes the victory of two goals to one.

The big gale
The gale of a fortnight ago played havoc with the boarding of the Everton enclosure at Anfield, much of which was levelled to the ground thereby enabling considerable extra expense upon the not over wealthy cupholders. Today, however, the match with Davenport will furnish their numerous admirers with a fitting opportunity for aiding the coffers of the club. That the game will be a good one may be regarded as certain as Everton will out ins strongest team in the field, and with a knowledge of this fact the Cheshire men will not leave a stone unturned to gain a victory.

Everton v Davenham
November 10 th 1884.
The Liverpool Courier. This match was played on Saturday at Anfield, in the presence of a goodly number of spectators. Davenham won the toss and played with the sun at their backs and a strong wind also in their favour. They at once bore down upon the Everton goal, and found Lindsay plenty of work, and although repulsed the visiting forwards again bore down the Everton goal this time with success. McGill kicked off, and Higgins and Gibson made a short run, but were stopped by Dutton who placed the ball to his forwards, who again mastered Lindsay, Cross scoring the second point. Shortly afterwards Dutton, from a scrimmage scored a third point, which brought half time. Everton now having the advantage of the strong breeze, now panned their opponents, and Gibson headed the first goal for Everton. The visitors played up with considerable dash and scored their fourth. McGill scored a second point for Everton, which was followed shortly after by a beautiful goal by W. Richards and another by Gibson. Great cheering was raised when Gibson just on the call of time breasted the final goal, and returned Everton winners by five goals to four. Teams; - Everton; - Lindsay, goal; Marriott and Morris, backs; Owen, Preston and Parry half-backs; W. Richards, McGill, Gibson, Higgins, and Finlay forwards. Davenham; - Shaw, goal; Goulding, and Riley, backs; Dalton, Whitby, Dutton, Cross, Holland, Haddock, Johnstone, and Morris, forwards.

November 15 th 1884. The Liverpool Courier.
Somewhat curious game was played by Everton and Davenham. Neither side could defend their standards against the strong breeze, and at half time the Liverpool cupholders were no fewer than three goals to the bad. Of course the change of ends placed Davenham at a lie disadvantage, although a point was added to their previous score. Towards the close, the Evertonians made one of their famous rushes, and were eventually the victors of a well won game by five goals to four. The drawing for the second round of ties in the Liverpool and District competition resulted as follows; - Earlestown v Ramblers; Cambrian or Haydock Temperance v St Mary's; Earlestown Wanderers v St. Peter's or Stanley; Bootle v Bootle Wanderers; Tranmere v St. Benedict's; Southport v Everton; Golborne v Wallasea; Skelmersdale a bye. The second round is to be played off on or before Dec 20 th and the third round must be completed on or before the 31 st January next.

Association Game
November 22 nd 1884. The Liverpool Courier.
One would imagine that after the brutal butchering of Saturday the Evertonians will have forever shaken the Davenham dust from off their feet. Hitherto this Cheshire Club has been held in respect in Liverpool, but now that events have shown they cannot lose like men, or accept with good grace defeat at the hands of a superior organisation, they will find they have forfeited all claim to further friendly consideration in this district. It was not enough to almost smash poor Preston's jaw with a reckless kick while heading the ball, or even to prostrate Parry with a savage kick in the abdomen, but when these good lads were prostrate and of no further use to their club, young Wal Richards who had to take the forward wing, alone and unaided, received a deliberate kick, which although impairing, his efficiency, did not necessitate him leaving the field. But although Preston was carried off in a fainting condition, and Parry was horse de combat , still Everton valorously played on, and revenged themselves by winning a signal victory over their reckless and inhumane opponents by two goals to one, and thus Davenhamites have been well thrashed in both engagements of the season. The game was an ordinary club fixture, but had such vicious tendencies been displayed in a cup-tie in the Liverpool district the local tribunal would have marked its sense in a manner that would have deterred others from following so baneful an example.
Today's games.
Everton v Bolton Wanderers, at Anfield.
Burscough v Everton 2d team, at Burscough.

Everton v Bolton Wanderers (A Team)
November 24 th 1884. The Liverpool Daily Post
Some disappointment was felt when it was found that the first team of the Wanderers was absent playing Aston Villa. Nevertheless, the large number of spectators who assembled at Prior-road (Walton Breck Road) had little to grumble about, as they witnessed a very fast and evenly contested game, resulting as it did in a draw, each side having scored two goals. A third point was gained by Everton, but not allowed. The visitors played a good combined game their heading being much admired, as was the back play of Dobson and Parkinson. The home backs also played well, but the forwards were occasionally all abroad, and appeared to forget their places. Bolton winning the toss McGill kicked off against the hill, Fallon early leading off with a rush Morris just checkmating in time. A corner following Richards and Brown prevented mischief, and Bolton's end was soon visited, Horroben being called on to hand out. Soon neat exchanges ensued, when from a nice screw from the right, Brown scored the first goal for Everton. From the kick off, Lindsay was soon given a turn, but saving smartly, play was again confined to the centre. Richards now got well up on the right, and passing forward, Brown centred, and Gibson shot the globe through but, the previous player being given off side, the point was disallowed. Corless and Scholes now dribbling up the left, cleverly evaded the backs, and a nice centre enabled Ward o equalise the score, a very short time elapsing before the same player notched the second point. Two corner kicks also fell to the visitors, but half time arrived, Everton being a goal to the bad. After crossing over Hough restarted, and for some time Bolton pressed the home team very hard. Breaking through at last, the Evertonians gained a couple of unproductive corners, Parkinson now sent the ball well up, and ward tested Lindsay severely. The home team now pulled themselves together, and got the leather away Parry having hard lines with a long shot, the ball striking the crossbar and just going over. However, from a smart scrimmage in front of goal, Brown was again successful, and amid loud cheers, made the score again level. The play became very fast now as each side tried to gain the winning point. A mistake by Marriott left the Evertonians at the mercy of Scholes, but failing to take his chance, time arrived with the score as above teams; - Everton; - C. M. Lindsay, goal; R. Morris and T. Marriott, backs; W. H. parry (captain), J. Preston, and J. Pickering, half-backs; W. Richards, W. Brown, J. McGill, M. Higgins and W. Gibson forwards. Bolton Wanderers “A”; - A. Horoben, goal; J. Parkinson (captain) and G. Dobson, backs; Turner, Bowen, Holden, half-backs; Fallon, Ward, Hough, Corbes and Scholes, forwards.

Everton v Davenham
November 26 th 1884. The Liverpool Courier.
Mr. James Sanders, Northwich writes; - “I feel it my duty as one who was present as a spectator at the football match played between Everton and Davenham on November 15, to write with reference to the remarks made upon that match in your football notes of Saturday last. The writer accuses the Davenham players of “butchery” also “deliberately kicking one of their opponents in the abdomen” and also “willfully kicking their legs from under them.” These charges, if true, would have very damaging effect on the Davenham club; but as an old football player, I must say that nothing whatever took place during the match which would in the slightest degree warrant any of these charges. The match was a well-contested and pleasant one throughout and free from disputes, and the accidents which two of the Everton players (Preston and Parry) met with were purely accidental, the injury to the last-named player being so slight that he played again in less than five minutes after it took place. The writer of the notes does not refer to the accident which befell one of the Davenham players (H. Holland) within ten minutes of the commencement of the game, and caused his retirement, and which will prevent him playing for some time to come. I am not a member of the Davenham club, nor in any way connected with it, but in the interest of Association football in this district I think the writer withdraw his remarks as publicly as he made them.”

Association game
November 29 th 1884. The Liverpool Courier.
A keen sense of public duty alone give rise to the severe comments in reference to the recent match between Everton and Davenham, in which the former had three of their players more or less injured. The evidence adduced was of such a concise and corroborative character that in the general interest of the Association game, the strictures were believed to be merited. Further evidence has revealed the fact that Holland, a Davenport player, was really the first sufferer, and it is now stated that probably he will not be able to resume play for some weeks to come. Thus it would appear there were four players who received hurt during the progress of the match showing that if there were faults they were not all on one side. Mr. T. Evans, however, who acted as referee, gives it as his opinion that the casualties were of an accidental character, and this being the case, the charges against the Davenport players are frankly withdrawn. Mr. Evans who, by the way, is an old Evertonians, further states; “I have seen Davenham play many times, and I am sure no club plays more fairly or accepts defeat better than they do, and as Mr. W. H. Parry expresses himself in like terms, it would indeed be difficult to refute such testimony. It should, however, be remembered that the pastime may unwittingly be rendered hazardous to life and limb and it therefore beholves all who participate in it to exercise wholesome restraint, and to deal with the utmost fairness forwards each other. Rarely has Everton played a better game than in the match of Saturday, in which the cupholders were opposed by a team of Bolton Wanderers, which contained several of last season's first team players. The game was very closely contested throughout, the result finally being two goals each.

Liverpool Ramblers v Everton
December 1 st 1884. The Liverpool Courier.
The district cupholders were on Saturday opposed on the cricket ground at Aigburth by a strong team of the Ramblers, which included Dr. J. Smith, whose connection with Queen's Park has rendered his name famous whenever the game is played. The great Scottish centre-forward, however, had not many opportunities for displaying those great powers, which he undoubtedly possesses, the reason of this being the want of cohesive action on the part of his colleagues. McGill having commenced the game the ball was at once taken up the Everton left and passed over in front of the standards, but although a most favorable chance of scoring was lost, Hull and Turner were in turn called upon to face the attack of the cupholders. The danger being staved off, Smith ran swiftly down the centre, and losing possession, Higgins and Gibson on the Everton left, and McGill in the centre, travelled the ball back to the home quarters. A free kick having fallen to the lot of the Ramblers without success, the attack was resumed, and after 15 minutes' play Whittle scored the first goal for the visitors. A retaliatory point appeared imminent, but on the sphere being smartly headed out of the mouth of the Everton goal, a rapid clearance was effected, and McGill gaining possession on the left of the home citadel, sent in a shot which beat the custodian, and thus early matters began to look serious for the Ramblers. Following this double reverse much characteristic activity was displayed by Earle, while Smith contributed some excellent play, as did also Hull, Winter, Preston, and Richards, for their respective sides, although between now and half-time nothing further was scored, a most brilliant but abortive run by Smith leading up to the change of ends. Shortly after play was resumed, an attack by Dr. Smith enabled Higgins and Parry to show their defensive powers, which were of the finest possible description. Then their ensued some beautiful play in midfield, and the Ramblers getting somewhat the best of the tussles S. George and the doctor were enabled to level shots at the Everton goal, but without success, although a moment later Smith made a grand run up the centre, and Lindsay coming out to check the rush, was completely beaten by a swift and low shot. Everton were now pressed for a while, during which period Lindsay stopped a hot shot from Wall, and the pressure being eased, the home eleven were beaten back to their own quarters, where Gibson receiving the ball from the pair on the right, Percy Eccles was for the third time called upon to surrender. From now to the call of “no side” the Evertonians had all the best of the play, and although a well-directed free kick by Preston did not result advantageously, the ball was quickly returned, and from a “header” by Gibson, Eccles assisted the transit of the ball through his own posts. Just before the close of the game Whittle, and Richards again took up the ball on the Everton right, and crossing over at the right moment McGill rushed up and put in the finishing stroke, which left the visitors winners of a well-contested game by five goals to one. Smith played exceedingly well for the losers when afforded a reasonable chance, and the best of the backs was A. B. Hull, who never played a better or more plucky game. For Everton, all played so well that it would be invidious to make a distinction. The following are the teams; - Ramblers; - A. P. Eccles goal; G. W. Turner (captain), and E. S Brown, backs; A. B. Hull and A. R. Milwood, half-backs; S. George, and O. G. Wall, right wing, Dr. J. Smith, and W. E. Earle, centre; Evans, and R. Winter, left wing. Everton; - C. M. Lindsay, goal; T. Marriott and R. Morris, backs; J. Pickering, J. Preston, and W. H. Parry (captain), half-backs; W. Richards, and J. Whittle, right wing; J. McGill, centre; M. Higgins and W. Gibson, left wing.

Association Game
December 6 th 1884. The Liverpool Courier.
With the exception of Rayner, the Ramblers had whipped up a strong a team as they could well get together to oppose Mr. Councilor Houlding boys, who, after their performance of the previous Saturday, seemed rather to like the arrangement. Foremost among the Public School men was Dr. J. Smith of Queen's Park celebrity and right well he played whenever the “wings” gave the famous “head-centre” a chance. Then the Ramblers had the services of “over-the—garden-wall” Smith of Notts and Midwood reappeared in the ranks of his old colleagues. But the cupholders were in the humour for a good game, and although it was thought the issue would be a close one, the Evertonians –who, by the way had Whittle again in front rank –gained the victory by no fewer than five goals to one. Everybody was glad to see “Benedict” in his old position, and the more pleased were they when he scored the first goal for the premier club. The doctor made several fine runs, in one of which he scored a success; but this was chiefly due to the old fault of the Everton backs of creeping up too closely on his heels of the front rank, and in the instance in point Lindsay, the custodian, was practically powerless. The experience, as it happened, was cheaply brought, and the alliteratively named backs –Pickering, Preston, and Parry, with Morris and Marriott –will do well to profit by the lesson. As a rale, however, the Evertonians played well, their last goal especially being obtained by some sterling good play. For the losers A. B. Hull, with S. George in the second half distinguished themselves as half-backs, as did E. S. Brown in their rear; while of the forward division the doctor was undoubtedly far and away ahead of his colleagues. For the match between Liverpool and District and Denbigshire to be played at Bootle Cricket Ground today, the following Evertonians have been selected, T. Marriott, J. Preston J. McGill (captain), and M. Higgins.

December 13 th 1884. The Liverpool Courier.
Today, in an ordinary fixture, the Liverpool cupholders and Stanley will be brought together and as the occasion, for more reasons than one presents features of novelty, the Anfield ground will be the centre of attractiveness in Association circles. Lately the Evertonians –who at length have settled down with a fixed team –have been playing a strong game, and it is quite possible they may show even greater improvement before the season is over. Stanley, in puranance of the same policy, has also made such rapid progress that the winners today will naturally be looked upon as the possible holders of the district trophy for the ensuing twelve months. The teams are as follows; - Everton; - C. M. Lindsay, goal; T. Marriott, and R. W. Morris, backs; J. Pickering, W. H. Parry and J. Preston half-backs; W. Richards, J. Whittle, J. McGill, W. Gibson, and M. Higgins, forwards. Stanley; - W. Wright, goal; G. Dovey, and A. McCallium, backs; J. Arlow, Kerr, and R. McCallum, half-backs; J. Grant, A. Wilson, W. Wilson, Culkin and G. bell, forwards. Referee Mr. Manners, Welsh Association.
Meanwhile on Friday the Everton secretary was apprised that Southport would be unable to put in an appearance against the cupholders.

Everton v Stanley
December 15 th 1884. The Liverpool Daily Post
No less than 800 spectators mustered on the Walton Breck-road ground on Saturday, to witness the contested between these clubs. The ground was heavy and fast and evenly contested game resulted. Stanley fully confirmed the form displayed against the district last week. The only change in their team on this occasion was Joliffe in goal, which post he fill very creditably. The back play of A. McCallium was good while Arlow was a host in himself. Cullin, Wright, and J. Wilson figured well forward. No fault could be found with the back division of the Evertonians, but in many instances some of the forwards dallied too long, and as a consequence lost the ball. Richards and Whittle played a dazzling game, the neat kicking of the latter being very effective. Stanley won the toss, and played uphill with a slight breeze at their backs, and at 3 p.m. McGill kicked off. A. McCallium returned, Parry interposed, and the Stanley end was visited. The shot went wide, and from the goal kick Arlow sent the leather to the right; Grant centred, but Marriott headed away, Wright rushed up, and passed to W. Wilson, but the shot from this player was too elevated to be effective. Stanley now made the pace hot, and the backs, never missing a return, completely panned the cup-holders. Lindsay was soon called on to kick clear, a corner to Stanley following, but a claim of hands in favour of the blue and white gave a temporary relief. Dovey met the kick off, and returning well, Wilson screwed to the left, where Wright, being handy, defeated Lindsay by a neat low shot after fifteen minutes' play. Restarting from the centre, the home team tried hard to make headway, but to no purpose, another corner accruing to the visitors. Parry headed clear, and Richards put in a fine run, and being ably seconded by Whittle, a corner resulted, but Pickering kicked behind. Shortly after Pickering passed to Richards, who sped along the right, screwing across in front of the Stanley uprights. The ball struck the crossbar, and Gibson rushed it through after another fifteen minutes' play. A magnificent bit of play by Whittle about two minutes after enabled Richards to repeat the operation –this time, however, the leather went through. An appeal was made that the ball went over the bar, but the referee allowed the score, to the intense delight of the friends of the Everton club. The cup-holders now appeared to be settling down to their work in a better style. Richards again sent the globe across from close to touch on the goalline, and McGill put the ball through. An appeal in this instance that the leather was in touch when kicked by Richards was sustained. Half-time arrived with the score two to one against Stanley. W. Wilson restarted, and the Everton right wing pair were soon prominent, an unproductive corner resulting. J. Wilson now dribbled along the right in neat style. Pickering putting in a timely check, returned the globe, and Higgins and McGill got it in front but A. McCallum spoiled their game. From a throw in by R. McCallum and a pass by Grant, Cullen shot the leather through the Everton upright, but being offside the point was not allowed. The Everton men now took a turn at pressing, the game being kept well in the Stanley end, where McGill and Parry had each a shy at goal, but with a like result, the leather going over. A foul against Everton enabled Wilson and Grant to make an incursion to the other end, but Lindsay saved smartly. The home team replied by testing Joliffe who cleared well. After a sharp tussle on the right, McGill sent across to Higgins, who defeated Joliffe, but being palpably off-side the point was not allowed. Time now arrived leaving the Evertonians victors by two goals to one. Teams; - Stanley; - Joliffe, goal; G. Dovey, and A. McCallum, backs; J. Arlow, Kerr, and R. McCallum, half-backs; Cullen, G. Wright, W. Wilson, J. Grant, and J. Wilson forwards. Everton; - C. Lindsay, goal; T. Marriott, and R. W. Morris, backs, J. Pickering, W. H. Parry (captain), and J. Preston half-backs; W. Gibson, M. Higgins, J. McGill, W. Richards, and J. Whittle forwards.

December 20 th 1884. The Liverpool Courier.
Everton, in presence of a large concourse of spectators gained as victory over Stanley by two goals to one, which however, cannot be accepted as a true reflex of the character of the play. In the cup-tie with Southport Everton will be represented as follows; C. Lindsay, goal; T. Marriott, and R. W. Morris, backs; J. Pickering, W. H. Parry, and J. Preston, half-backs; W. Richards, M. Higgins, J. Whittle, J. McGill, and W. Gibson forwards. A team of the Blackburn Rovers will play Everton in their own ground at Anfield on Saturday next.

Daily Post
“Fast and furious” Stanley led off last Saturday against Everton, and had they been able to keep it up the cup holders would have been smothered entirely, as they were penned for the first twenty minutes as tightly as ever men were. In the second half Everton well repaid the compliment, but there were several chances lost through want of decision. Pickering and Parry played a capital game, as did Whittle and Richards forward. Arlow (Stanley) is a really good man at half-back and rarely misses his kick, and all through he played a splendid game. There was not so much in it after all –two goals to one in favor of Everton.

Everton v Southport
December 22 nd 1884. The Liverpool Daily Post.
The match between these clubs was brought off on the Sussex-road ground Southport, on Saturday, in the second round of the Liverpool and District cup-tie. There was only a moderate attendance of spectators, but they made up in enthusiasm what they lacked in numbers. The day was fine, but cold, and a strong wind blowing almost from goal to goal interfered very much with the play. The result of two to one in favour of Everton looks a very near thing, but the actual state of the game was much in favour of the cupholders. The excellent goalkeeping of Platt in the first half, and the bad state of the ground in front of the posts at the road-end in the second half, had much to do with it. The home forwards are all possessed or rare speed, but they lack combination, Dalby, Morris, and Briggs being about the pick –Parkes, Bailey, and Burnett doing good service in the back division. The Everton team as a whole played a sterling game, especially in the second half when facing the wind the ball was kept well down, the passing being exceptionally clever, but many shots from Whittle and McGill went wide through losing their foothold in the soft sand in front of the goal. Everton winning the toss turned their backs to the wind, and Dalby kicked off, the home end soon being the scene of some smart scuffles. Morris managed to evade Preston and dribbled to the Everton end, but being met by his namesake the leather was soon on the tuck track. Richards screwing across from the right the ball struck one of the home team, who were all crowding in goal, and going over to the left Higgins met it and shot it through six minutes from the start. An appeal for off-side was not sustained. From the kick off the ball was soon in front of the home citadel, where the pressure was kept up, on two occasions Platt, on receiving the ball in his hands ran out before throwing clear. The Everton men appealed, re the carrying clause, but the decisions were adverse. The home right wing pair now got away, and Morris missing his kick Briggs looked dangerous, Parry however, prevented mischief, and Platt was again called on to save his charge, which he did in capital style, evoking well merited applause. By a grand piece of passing by Richards Whittle, McGill, and Higgins, the latter defeated Platt a second time after thirty-five minutes' play. Everton secured a couple of corners, but half-time arrived without any further score. After crossing over the ball was soon on its way, but for a considerable time it was continually kicked into touch, until about ten minutes elsaped, when Briggs and Mellor got clear, and from a bully in front of the visitors' goal the ball went through off Lindsay. The home club were now jubilant, but was better first and last point. The Everton backs playing grandly fed the forwards Higgins and Gibson on the left, and Whittle and Richards on the right, repeated invaded the home end, whilst the veteran Jack was well on the ball a shot from the latter just missing. Again Higgins screwed across a goal being averted at the expense of a corner. Soon after Whittle had a shy but slipping down the ball went over. Briggs on the left and Morris on the right got well up occasionally, but when the whistle sounded the score remained as above. Teams; - Everton; - C. M. Lindsay, goal; R. Morris and T. Marriott backs; W. H. Parry (captain), J. Pickering and J. Preston, half-backs; M. Higgins, W. Gibson, J. McGill, W. Richards, and J. Whittle, forwards. Southport; - S. Platt, goal; T. R. Burnett and H. Baxter, backs; J. H. Johnson, J. Parkes, and J. Bailey half-backs; J. Briggs, P. Mellor, A. Dalby (captain), J. Mellors, and T. Morris forwards.

EVERTON V BLACKBURN ROVERS (A TEAM)
December 29, 1884. The Liverpool Mercury.
This match was played on Saturday last at Walton Breck-road Anfield and was the means of bringing the largest “gate” the Everton club have yet received. The Rovers' team have been playing at Birmingham this Christmas and was therefore not in the best of trim and the same may be said about the Everton team also. The only difference in the Everton team was the absence of Morris, who is spending his holidays at home, and the substitution of C. Jones in his place of Higgins in the left wing. The ground was in a very slippery condition, owing to the severe frost which took place the night previous; but nevertheless a good game resulted. Upon starting Everton at once pressed their opponents and good run on both the Everton wings were made. McGill bringing himself into notice by a very fine shot, which almost took effect. At length Blenkhorn and Lever relieved the pressure, and the Rovers left scampered away up field, but when near the corner were tackled by Pickering, and after some dodging play, Pickering got the ball and sent it to Richards, and he and McGill again visited the visitors' goal. Everton now in turn, were pressed surely, and Parry and Marriott had to work hard to slave off danger; but playing well they succeed in keeping the goal intact, although good and hot shots were shot in by Barton, Duckworth and Birtwistle. Pickering relieving the pressure gave Whittle possession, and he made a shot, but slipping in the act the shot was but a tame one, and was easily cleared by Standon. Higgins now took a flying shot, which dropping near the goal, was promptly rushed through by McGill, who thus scored the first point for Everton amidst great cheering. Play from now up to half-time was of an even character, the score not being increased. Upon recommencing, the Rovers by the help of Sumner and Barton pressed Pickering and Marriott sorely, and Preston was forced to give a corner, but nothing came of it. W. Richards having come to help his back division, got hold of the sphere and quickly transferred the scene of hostilities and passing to Gibson at the proper time, a goal was registered for Everton and the game stood then at 2 to nil. The double reverse roused the Rovers, and they again pressed the Everton men, and were awarded with a corner kick. This was beautifully placed, and out of the scrimmage a goal was scored for the Rovers. Shortly after this a heavy mist came on, and settled very close down, so that it was impossible to see across the field, and it was then though advisable to cease playing, and so the game ended in a draw in favour of Everton by 2 goals 1. W. Richards played a splendid game for Everton. The Rovers were afterwards entertained to supper by the home team, and a very pleasant evening was spent. Teams:- Everton:- C. Lindsay, goal; T. Marriott and W. H. Parry (captain), backs; J. Pickering, J. Preston, and M. Higgins, half-backs; W. Richards, J.W. Whittle, J. McGill, C. Jones and W. Gibson, forwards. Blackburn Rovers: - W. Standon, goal; Lever and Blenkborn, backs; Gregson, Woodfall, and Barton, half-backs; Duckworth, Crossley, Birtwistle, A. Barton, G. Sumner, forwards. Mr. Manners, referee.

Everton v Blackburn Rovers
December 29 th 1884. The Liverpool Courier.
A match between Everton and a team of Blackburn Rovers was played on the Everton ground at Anfield, on Saturday, about 1,000 spectators. Everton kicked off down-hill, some good passing being shown by the visitors, McGill Gibson, and Preston also showing to advantage. At last Everton broke away towards the visitors' goal where McGill took a shot, which however, did not succeed. The home goal was now in turn assailed and a shot by Sumner nearly taking effect, the ball hitting the crossbar and rebounded into play, when it was taken down the field, and McGill scored the first goal for Everton, amid tremendous cheering and waving of hats. Half-time arrived shortly afterwards, the score standing at one goal for Everton to Blackburn Rovers nil. On re-starting the ball was passed to Richards who dribbled straight up the field, and from a corner kick passed in front of the visitors goal to Gibson, who headed a splendid goal for Everton, the spectators being quite enthusiastic. On the sphere being kicked off Marriott returned and the home forwards rushed up the field, Higgins taking a shot at the visitors' fortress, which caused its defender to use his hands. Then the Rovers initiated a further attack, and Sumner scored their first and only goal. On restarting Higgins, McGill, and Richards took the ball once more to the Rovers goal, where Richards again passed to Gibson, but on that player trying to head the ball through the uprights, it glanced off his shoulder into touch. Shortly afterwards McGill scored a second goal, which was disallowed. The fog then coming on the players could not distinguish each other, and it was decided to stop play five minutes before the ordinary time, the game ending in a draw in favour of Everton by two goals to one goal for the Rovers. Teams; - Rovers; - Standing goal; Hopwood, and Leaver, backs; Gregson, Barton, and Blankborn, half-backs; Sumner, A. Barton, Duckworth, Crossley, and Birksley, forwards. Everton; - C. M. Lindsay goal; T. Marriott and J. Pickering backs; J. Preston, W. Parry (captain) and M. Higgins, half-backs; W. Gibson, C. Jones, J. McGill, W. Richards and J. Whittle, forwards.

Everton v Birkenhead
January 5 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
A hastily-arranged fixture between these clubs was brought to a decision at Anfield on Saturday in the presence of a goodly assemblage of spectators, but although the result was in favour of Everton by two goals to nil, the play generally was not up to the standard usually shown by these clubs. Neither side however, had up their full strength the visitors having to avail themselves of local aid. The beat feature of the game was the goalkeeping of Chalmers, who averted danger on many occasions in capital style. Collins kicked off for Birkenhead and for a length of time the visitors were very much pressed, during which period Everton had several corner kicks, which were not turned to advantage. At length Bowering headed a raid upon the home fortress, which Marriott relieved by a timely kick just outside the standards. Following the kick from the corner Birkenhead again bore down upon the Everton goal, which, however, withstood the attack, and the opposite citadel was in turn beleaguered, narrowly escaping from an assault, in which McGill was the main actor. Shortly afterwards Collins gave Crellin a good opportunity, which passing off harmlessly, half-time was reached without either side having scored a point. When ends were changed Everton, with the hill in their favour, bore down menacingly on the Birkenhead stronghold, which found a doughty defender in Highett who cleared danger in capital style, although directly afterwards Chambers had to fist out an overhead shot delivered by McGill. For a little while Chalmers continued to be thus occupied, and on a couple of occasions the cupholders experienced somewhat hard lines in not scoring, a further shot by McGill just clearing the bar. Then Jones, on the Everton left, dribbled admirably, and by stages the leather was again worked within measurable distance of the Birkenhead uprights, and on Pickering crossing to Gibson, Jones rushed up, and amid applause aided the ball in its transit through goal. Following the kick-out a brief visit was paid to the Everton end, and the attack being repulsed the whole mass of players rushed down the hill and during a hot scrimmage, waged in front of the Birkenhead goal Jones again got his foot to the ball and scored his second success with great adroitness. The subsequent play was of a fairly even character, and no further points being scored victory remained with the Evertonians as above indicated. Jones played a good game for Everton, while for Birkenhead Chalmers kept goal admirably, being well supported by Hignett and Bowering. Collins and Stevenson were the best of the visiting forwards. Teams; - Everton; - Edwards, goal; T. Marriott and W. parry backs; F. Welsh, J. Pickering, and J. Preston, half-backs; M. Higgins, Walter Brown, J. McGill, C. Jones, and W. Gibson forwards. Birkenhead; - G. Chalmers, goal; W. Beynon, and R. Hignett, backs; W. Owen, W. Bowring, and A. D. McLallan, half-backs; W. Cullen, G. Hayhurst, J. Collins, J. Stevenson and W. Finley, forwards. Today at Anfield Everton will be opposed by Dumbarton this being the last fixture of the Scottish team in this district.

EVERTON V DUMBARTON ROVERS
January 6, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury.
A match between the Liverpool combination cupholders and the Dumbarton Rovers was played yesterday at Anfield before a fair attendance of spectators. In the first half, the Scotchmen had the best of the play, and scored three goals within 15 minutes from the start, a fourth point being added before half-time; while the home team –who were minus of four of their best players, and played second team men –were unable to score. In the second half, both sides worked hard and the game was more even; but still Everton could not put the ball through, though they had hard lines several times. Just before call of time the Scotchmen placed another point top their credit, and won by 5 goals to nil. The goals were obtained by Dewar (2), Black (2), and C. Stewart. The game was a fast one throughout, but the fine passing of the visitors completely upset the home team. Higgins, Richards and Whittle played very well, but they were poorly supported. Teams:- Everton:- Lindsay, goal; Marriott and Finlay, backs; Pickering, Preston and Parry (captain), half-backs; W. Richards, W. Brown, Whittle, Higgins, and Mowbray, forwards. Dumbarton:- M. Anderson, goal; W. Veitch and T. Veitch, backs; G. Hulton, and R. Devlin, half-backs; R. Goodwin, C. Stewart, J. Black, J. Dewar, J. Watt and A. Aitken, forwards.

Dumbarton v Everton
January 6 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
The Dumbarton juniors completed their holiday tour in this district yesterday at the Anfield enclosures, where they were opposed by the Liverpool cupholders. Everton, however, was very poorly represented, and as the visitors showed great improvement on their Saturday's form, the home eleven were defeated by five goals to nil. Everton had hard luck on several occasions, but the weak spots in the team led to continual disaster –Mowbray in particular, a second team man, playing wretchedly. Shortly before three o'clock Whittle started the ball on behalf of Everton, and in less than five minutes from the start the Dumbarton after a smart and fast piece of play by the centre and right pairs, scored their first success. Shortly afterwards another attack was initiated, and during a scrimmage the Dumbarton again forced the ball through, whilst before fifteen minutes had elapsed the Everton colours were lowered for the third time. No sooner had the ball been restarted than the attack was resumed as vigorously as ever, and for safety Marriott headed the ball out. The corner-kick proved futile, and for a brief space of time Everton had a look in at the portable of the opposite fortress. The play now became exceedingly animated, and as the local cupholders warmed to their work the outside enthusiasm rose. Anderton, the Scottish custodian, had a hottish time of it, but he saved grandly, and eventually the attack was starved off. Still, a moment later the ball was in front of the Scottish citadel, and Brown essayed an overhead shot, which passed just outside the uprights; whilst twice in close succession Anderton had to use his hands. Then Preston gave a “foul” and the ball was worked back to the centre, when Dewer and Black fastening upon the sphere crossed to the right, and Watt administered the final touch, thus scoring the fourth goal for Dumbarton. Following the kick off Whittle made a fine run up the right, and the home team had very hard lines in not scoring. Shortly afterwards ends were changed, the visitors having had all the best of the play. Even with the hill against them the Scots played up strongly, their short passing and rapid action proving very perplexing to the home players. Watt and Aitken, on the Scottish right were now seen to great advantage, but they were well met by the home backs. Occasionally Everton made a raid upon the lower goal, but the shots threat were most unfortunate, passing either just outside or over the bar. During the succeeding play the Scotchmen made several raids upon the home goal, but the backs held stoutly to their charge, and for a while succeedingly cleared danger. At length a further chance was afford Everton, Richards being conspicuous, but although a “corner” accrued nothing came of it, nor did Dumbarton profit from a similar advantous position. A moment later however, Goodwin and Dewer took up the ball splendidly, and the fifth goal was scored off one of the Everton men. This was the last point scored in the game, and the closing play was not of a nature require comment. The following are the teams; - Dumbarton; - M. Anderton, goal; W. Veitch and T. Veitch, backs; Develin and Hatton, half-backs; J. Watt, and R. Aitken, right wing; W. G. Black, and J. Dewar (captain), centre; A. Stewart, and R. Goodwin, left wing; Everton; - C. M. Lindsay, goal; T. Marriott and Mowbray backs; J. Pickering, J. Preston, and W. F. Parry (captain), half-backs; W. Richards, W. Brown, J. Whittle, W. Finlay, and M. Higgins forwards. Note, W. Richards and Whittle also played for St Benedict's against Tranmere at New Brighton on Saturday.

Association Game
January 10 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
The canceling of fixtures led to an arrangement between Everton and Birkenhead, who met at the Anfield enclosure on Saturday last. Neither however, placed in the field their ordinary team, and thus the game was divited of much of its interest. There was a holiday like staleness in the play of the cup holders, although they ultimately managed to win by a couple of goals to nil, the winning points being made by Jones the new accession to the team. On the losing side Chambers acquitted himself so well in goal as to favour the opinion that he would be worth a trial in one of the district matches. He is of good stature, kicks out well in front of goal, and uses his fists in a manner that would render him a formidable opponent to anyone who dared to “tread upon the tail of the coat.” He also possesses the essential attribute of coolness, and with increased facilities, would no doubt develop into a goal-keeper of the highest order. The result of the two Dumbarton games has put a somewhat different complexion on local form, and the problem will only be solved on the 31 st instant, when Everton and Bootle meet in the third round of the Liverpool and District competition. Ever since the introduction of the Association game into the district there has been a keen rivalry between the clubs, and there are already indications that it will reach the culminating point on the date mentioned. Bootle has a recent defeat to efface, but the winning margin was so narrow, while the ex-holders of the trophy have made such unmistakable progress during the past few weeks, that there is little to choose between the teams. If we were to set the Bootle drawn game with Dumbarton against the five-goal defeat of Everton, the odds would be greatly in favour of Bootle. In their match with Dumbarton, however, the Everton eleven was not only a weak representation as regards the personnel , but more than one of the older and accredited members of the team was considerably “off colour.” But, be the result as it may it will be a hard contest, and whether Everton win or lose Mr. Treasurer Twemlow will have no reason to regret the meeting of the rivals in the third round of the competition. It will be a good game, and the desire of all impartial lovers of the pastime will be that the better team may win.

EVERTON V STANLEY
January 12, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
Turning to local matches the most important was that between Everton and Stanley, the game being played on the ground of the former, and the home team won by 4 to 1. Stanley started with a slight breeze at their backs up hill, and soon took the game into the home team's quarter. After about ten minutes play Everton broke away and scored the first goal. Stanley worked well up the field, and from a shot from the right wing, which Lindsay only partially repelled, Culkin equalised. A little later Joliffe made a mistake in leaving his goal to assist McCallum (who, unfortunately, missed his kick) and it was a very easy matter indeed for McGill to score the second goal, and the total was 2 to 1 in favour of Everton at half-time. Stanley surprised the spectators by their plucky display against the wind and downhill, and the game was evenly contested until Gibson from a melee in front shot the third goal. McCallun then broke down at the knee and changed places with W. Wilson, who to the finish played a grand back game dribbling and dodging the Everton men in grand style. Everton now pressed Stanley rather hotly and put in several warm shots, causing the backs to save occasionally; several shots Joliffe manipulated very well, and somewhat cleverly too, until one easy slow one passed clean through his hands and legs to the intense amusement of players and onlookers. Stanley, on the whole played better than in the previous match, although Arlow would not take part in the game, and W. Wilson and Culkin were the best of the losers' forwards –playing brilliantly all through; whilst Kerr and Owens at half were very good. Owens gained many admirers from his plucky display, and being second team captain, and a young player, the club are expecting something good from him in the future. A.M. McCallun was off colour. For Everton Goulay (St. Mark's Colleage), Powell (Battenea Colleage) and W. Richards were in fine form, especially the college players. Parry and Higgins were the best behind and S. Evans at full back considering his long retirement from the game played well.

January 17, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
Anfield, Darwen Old Wanderers v Everton
Warrington, Everton (Second Team) v. Warrington.

EVERTON V DARWEN OLD WANDERS
January 19, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
This match was played at Anfield on Saturday, in the presence of about 1000 spectators. A very even and well contested game ended in a draw –one goal each. The Everton goal was obtained by Pickering, Whittle did not turn up until sometime after the game had start, and Higgins met with an accident to his leg which caused him to leave the field for about a quarter of an hour. The home team had a light advantage in the play all through.

Everton v Darwin Old Wanderers
January 19 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
A large amount of public interest centred in this match, which came on for decision at the Anfield ground on Saturday afternoon, when there could not have been less than 1,000 persons present to welcome this Darwen team to the district. The game was well contested throughout and so level was the scoring that at the end of the game the score stood one goal each and the match consequently, remained drawn. This result is all the more creditable to the Liverpool cupholders who, unfortunately, owing to an accident, lost the valuable services of Higgins early in the game, and wore thus very heavily handicapped.

Association Game
January 24 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
In response to the invitation of Everton, a large and enthusiastic crowd assembled at Anfield enclosure to witness the play between the cupholders and the Darwen Old Wanderers, who have up to the present been successful in the Lancashire cup ties. The game was highly interesting, and as the local players, although seriously handicapped through losing the services of Higgins scored goal for goal with their opponents, the result is strong presumptive evidence that the Evertonians have fully recovered their form.
Todays matches
Everton v Liverpool Cambrian, at Anfield
Liverpool Gymnasium v Everton “A” team at Sefton park.

January 24, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
Sefton Park, Liverpool Gymnasium v Everton (A Team)
Walton, Abbert v Everton (Second team).
Everton v Cambrian
These local association clubs meet today at Anfield. The teams as follows: - Everton; Lindsay; Marriott, Morris; Pickering, Parry, Preston; Richards, Whittle, McGill, Jones, Gibson. Cambrians; Roberts; Williams, Jones; Corey, Kettley, Harrison; Dykens, Morris, Griffths, Jones, Evans.
• Berry, Astley, Williams played for Wallasey.

Cambrian v Everton
January 26 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
These clubs met for the first time on the ground of the latter, among a goodly number of spectators. There were several alterations in both teams, as J. D. V. Jones appeared in the centre of the Cambrians, while Harrison took Williams's place at full back. Finlay, Gurley, and T. Evans appeared for the Everton in place of McGill, Richards, and Lindsay. Jones kicked off, his side playing down hill. For the first five minutes play was confined to Everton territory until a strong kick by Morris enabled the Evertonians to pay a visit to their opponents' goal. Dykens and T. Morris were the first to come in for notice by a series of fines runs which ended in a kick out by Evans. Griffiths; throwing in well-enabled Dykens by a fine heel-kick to score the first goal. After the kick-off C. Jones and Whittle did some splendid passing, but were unable to trouble Roberts. A scrimmage in front of the Welsh citadel enabled Finlay to score the first goal for his side amid great cheering. The Cambrians now worked well together, their captain doing immense services, but their efforts to score were frustrated by Morris's fine play at back until this player's namesake sent in a fine shot which was converted into a goal by Jones. Half-time arrived and found the Welshmen leading by a goal. After kick-off Parry led on his men in fine style, his heading being admirable. Some give and take play followed until the Evertonians obtained a corner, which Jones turned into a goal. Neil and J. Evans, playing the finest forward game on the field, now gave much trouble to Marriott and T. Evans, and several times were near scoring, but Morris came to the rescue. T. Morris, after a fine run, sent in a stinging shot which was well kept out by Pickering, but Dyken's being at hand again secured another point for his side. However, Parry's men were equal to the occasion, and made matters equal from a foul in front of goal, Everton was beaten by four goals to three. Teams; - Everton; - Pickering, goal; T. Morris and Marriott, backs; Evans, Parry (captain), and Preston, half-backs; Gurley, Gibson, Finlay, Whittle and Jones, forwards. Cambrians; - Roberts gaol; F. R. Jones, and Harrison. Backs; Coney, Kettley (captain), and Griffiths, half-backs; Dykens, Morris, Jones, Neil, and Evans, forwards.

FOOTBALL NOTES.
January 26, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury.
The local match between the Everton and Cambrian club cause some stir in local Association circles, and there was a large attendance of spectators at Anfield to witness the struggle between the cup holders and the disqualified Welshmen. The spectators were somewhat demonstrative and the visitors were literally hooted when leaving the field of play, and the captain, who played a very rough game, came in for special attention. Both sides played with great dash in the second half, though the Cambrians, to the surprise of a good many of the spectators, showed such fine form that most of the play took place in the Everton quarters. At one point C. Jones, in dribbling up the right wing, was checked by F.R. Jones, and slipped down, and on appeal the referee decided a foul, though the opinion of many was that the tackling was fair. In the second half great exception was taken to the unnecessarily rough play of the Welshmen. Tripping and charging was the order of the day, and though the Everton team was not altogether faultless, the example shown by the Cambrain captain was very indiscreet. At one time, just before the close, the game had to be stopped through, it was said, Kettley's violent conduct, and in the end the Cambrians won by 4 goals to 3. Neil Evans, Morris, and F.R. Jones played a fine game for the Cambrians, and if all the members worked in the same fashion as the players the club would stand as one of the best in Liverpool. The Evertonians were short of some of their best men, Lindsay the goalkeeper, was absent, so also were Higgins, McGill, and Richards. So that if these players had been in their places the result might have been different. Gourley and Finlay, who took the places of Higgins and McGill, worked remarkably well, and C. Jones, Gibson and Parry were in fine form. Pickering had to go in goal, and did so fine that without doubt he saved the score being higher for the Weshmen. Everton and Bootle, holders and ex-holders of the district trophy, meet next Saturday in the Cup competition, and judging from Everton's play on Saturday, they will have to be very careful, or the Bootle team will get the better of them.

EVERTON V CAMBRIAN
January 26, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
This match was played on Saturday, on the Everton ground, Anfield, before a large number of spectators. Everton were short of four of their first team, including their goalkeeper, while the Cambrians put a strong eleven into the field. The visitors kick-off, and the ball was immediately taken into the Everton quarters, two corners falling to the lot of the Welshmen, but nothing came of them. The home team were still being pressed when Parry gave a splendid kick from midfield, causing Roberts to save. Again the Welsh forwards got possession, and from a throw in Dykens scored the first point for the Cambrians ten minutes from the start. On re-starting Everton were once more obliged to act on the defensive, when Gourlay ran the ball along the left wing, then passed to C. Jones, who in turn transferred it to Finlay, when the latter player made the score even. Play was now confined to the Welsh territory, until Neil made a grand run the whole length of the field, when Pickering saved. Some even play now took place. Dykens eventually took possession, centred, and out of a scrimmage the visitors scored a second time. This put both teams on the mettle, and the ball travelled from goal to goal, but nothing more was scored when half-time was called. On re-starting after some give and take play, Neil and Evans worked the ball into Everton's quarters, and a claim of hands a few yards from goal gave the Welshmen an excellent opportunity, but nothing came of it. A second foul still closer also being unproductive, hostilities were now transferred to the visitors half, and Roberts, in trying to save, ran out with the ball, a free kick being given to the home team in consequence. The Welshmen succeeded in clearing the goal, but a few minutes later C. Jones put the leather through, making the game even. Both sides now worked with great determination, and play became very rough. Morris gave a free kick from midfield but with such precision, that Pickering was obliged to fist the ball out; but the ball was immediately returned by Dykens, and though Pickering knocked it was a second time, the referee decided that he was far in goal at the time, and a third point was placed to the credit of the Welshmen. Shortly afterwards Everton again scored, and just before time was called Corey added a fourth point for the Cambrians, who won a stubbornly contested game by four goals to three. All the Cambrian forwards played well. Neil and G. Evans in particularly showing some very neat passing, while F.R. Jones, was of great service at back. Gourley, C. Jones, Finlay, and Gibson were the pick of the Everton team. Everton was beaten by four goals to three. Teams; - Everton; - Pickering, goal; T. Morris and Marriott, backs; Evans, Parry (captain), and Preston, half-backs; Gurley, Gibson, Finlay, Whittle and Jones, forwards. Cambrians; - Roberts gaol; F. R. Jones, and Harrison. Backs; Coney, Kettley (captain), and Griffiths, half-backs; Dykens, Morris, Jones, Neil, and Evans, forwards.

EVERTON V CAMBRIANS
January 27, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
“W. Robertson,” in a strongly-worded letter, portions of which we cannot publish, says –“ As an impartial onlooker of the above match on the Everton ground on Saturday last, I wish to add a little information of your notes thereon, printed in Monday's Mercury, as to the leading characteristics of the play. Such a disgraceful exhibition of sport, I have not at any time witnessed, and many others present were of the same opinion, and the wonder is that some of the Everton players did not receive serious injury. More ungentlemanly play and conduct on the part of one or two of the Cambrians players it would be impossible to conceive more especially on the part of the player Chettley, alluded to in your columns and the fact of the feeling manifest towards him by many spectators may be gathered when he had to be guarded off the ground. One of the Everton players, immediately after the resumption of the second half of the game, had to be carried off the ground. Severely hurt by a kick from an opposing player. This act was witnessed by several, including the writer, and I understand the injury party is now under a Doctor's care. Another Cambrian player repeatedly tried to knock the legs from under certain opposing players, and in one instance succeeded his efforts, hence the foul alluded to in your paper. The attempts were observed by many and severely remarked upon. As to the captain of the Cambrian team, the greatest cause of the strong feeling against him was when he struck an opposing player. This conduct stopped the play for a time, and such a feeling was created that spectators rushed upon the field. I think it but right, in the interest of all concerned, in the game of football, that such conduct should be strengthly dealt with by the Association or exposed through the press, thus taking steps towards preventing serious injury.”

Everton (A Team) v Gymnasium
January 27 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
The first meeting of the above teams took place on Saturday at Sefton-Park, and after a well contested and pleasant game resulted in a win for the Everton men by four goals to two. The Gymnasium scored three goals, one being disallowed, the ball having previously been out of play. The Gymnasium goals were obtained by Conning, who played well throughout, being ably assisted by Ufferman, Alaxander, and Groom, forwards, and Cox, and Sneden, backs, of whom a splendid game. For Everton, Scott, was their best man, centering and passing in good style. Everton's weak spot was their goalkeeper, who, however, must be excused, as he played under disadvantage.

EVERTON V CAMBRIAN
January 28, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
To The Editor of the Liverpool Mercury
Gentleman –as another impartial onlooker at the football match, played at Anfield on Saturday, may I be allowed to say that I have witnessed every match played on this ground since the opening of the season, though I am not personally acquainted with a single member? I simply know the names of the players by repute. I love the sport, and could stand all day watching it. My opinion, and that of the crowd who stood where I did, and as far as we were able to judge, is that Everton played quite as rough as the Cambrian. There was little to choose; both sides were determined to win; but the Cambrians displayed the better skill by far, and honestly and deservedly won a well-merited game. It is a great pity the Everton and those who are so prejudiced in their favour did not accept their “licking” with good grace, and swallow the Leeks peacefully. With respect to the Cambrians captain (A gentleman with one aim) striking an Everton player, it should in justice be stated that the ball was out of bounds and belonged to the Cambrians. One of who was stooping to pick it up, when an Everton player ran with great force and kicked it, narrowly escaping seriously wounding the Welshmen; hence the misunderstanding. About half-time and when it was removed outside the ground that the Everton were overmatched, a large number of boys –anxious to hect the Cambrians –were admitted (two of my sons was among the number), and right merrily did they reward the Evertonians for the kindness, I hope for the future of the Everton club will display better feeling towards the Stanley Park players, and, if they should ever again meet, they will part good friends. An impartial observer, Jan, 27, 1885.

Everton v Cambrians.
January 29 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
“Lookers on “ writes –on Saturday I among many others visited the ground in Anfield-road in expectation of watching a good humoured and well-contested game. Imagine my surprise at beholding the disgraceful conduct of the visiting team and the unseemly brawling that took place. Was it the intention of the Cambrian team? Had it been planned that as many of the Everton men as possible should be placed hor de combat? If so, they admirably succeeded, especially among those who are to take part in the Cup tie with Bootle on Saturday next. Saturday last was not the first occasion on which this team has showed its aptitude for horseplay. A few weeks ago the St. Mary's met the Cambrians in the second round of the cup-ties, the latter club winning the disapproval of the lookers-on by their unfair and rough tactics. George, the captain of the St. Mary's, having his leg ripped from ankle to knee. Knowing this, no wonder the spectators on the Anfield ground on Saturday mobbled the club so notoriously for its very ungentlemanly conduct; and it would probably have gone hard with some of them had not the home team marched them of the ground under the escort of their own players. Such conduct as this, and on the eve of a great cup fight, should be brought under the notice of the Liverpool Association, who will fail in their duty if they do not erase the name of “Cambrian” from their books.

Association Game
January 31 st 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
Everton and the new Welsh club, the Cambrians, met for the first time on Saturday, and from what has since transpired it will probably be a long time before the latter renew their acquaintance with the Anfield enclosure. Everton were only moderately represented, and having the misfortune to loss the services of one of their best man of the team during the progress of the game, the cupholders had to submit to a defeat of four goals to three. The game was altogether an unpleasant one, and at its close such was the poplar indignation against Kettley, the Cambrian captain, that he was compelled to leave the field under an escort of the Everton players. Kettley is an old and experienced exponent of the Association code, but in this particular match his style of play seems to have given offence to a very large number of the spectators, and hence the tumultuous proceeding which marked the close of the game. Charges of rough play have been freely made, and we have had opportunity of persusing much of the evidence, but as it is of a conflicting character it would be unwise to attempt to pass judgement upon it. The game was an improvised one, and ought to have been a friendly character. That it should have been otherwise is much to be regretted, and perhaps, under all the circumstances the greater sufferers will be the Cambrians.

FOOTBALL NOTES
February 2, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury.
In the local cup competition on Saturday, great enthusiasm was manifested in the tie between Everton and Bootle, and so evenly was the game all through to the stipulated time that no goals were scored, and an extra half-hour was agreed upon. This latter period exceptionally a display of brilliant football, being carried through in a most sportsman like manner, and excitement ran high, when a goal was recorded very quickly to each side; but when the Blue and White quarters made the score two to one in their favour, the supporters of the club cheered most vigorously, and indulged themselves in a wonderful amount of enthusiastic fanatics, and so the finish of a grand contest resulted in the cup-holders' favours. The winners thoroughly deserve the victory, as they and all worked with in exceptionable ardour. The same likewise can be stated in reference to the losers, but their combined forward play lacked the close and neat style displayed by the Everton dribblers. One beauty of the affairs remains that neither team indulged in any unduly rough tactics. For Bootle Woods created favourable impressions by his display at half-back, Evans, Sloane, Rogers, McMurray, and Eyton-Jones (Played captally in their respective positions. Parry, Finlay, Whittle, and Richards for Everton, played a brilliant game; the former distinguishing himself, whilst the rest were all in grand form.

Liverpool Cup
Everton v Bootle
February 2 nd 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
By far the greatest interest shown in Assoication football in this district was manifested in the meeting of these teams at the Anfield enclosure on Saturday in the third round of the local competition. There could not have been less than 3,000 spectators present, and it is worthy of mention that the great crowd was of the most orderly description, while the game, although extremely fast, was splendidly contested from beginning to end. The backs on both sides played grandly, and so admirable was the defence that after two “forty-fives” had been played the record was a blank. It was at once decided to play the extra-half hour, and the game had not proceeded much further when Betts scored for Bootle amidst much cheering; but when a minute later Whittle equalised the score the enthusiasm on the part of the home partisans knew no bounds. Thus, when the final change of ends was made, the record was still even, and then commenced the great struggle for supremacy. At length Parry, the Everton captain, put in a shot which beat the Bootle custodian, and the cupholders left the field amid a scene of indescribable excitement the victors by two goals to one, the bulk of the team being borne off triumphantly on the shoulders of their enthusiastic supporters. Then Bootle captain having named successfully in the toss for choice of ends, at five minutes past three McGill started the ball. Directly afterwards a foul gave Everton a free kick, but still the visitors, deriving advantage from the slope, bore down on the lower goal. The Evertonians, however, speedily returned the ball with interest, and during a counter attack Finlay was enabled to shoot, although abortively, at the Bootle stronghold. Eyton-Jones, Davey Williams, and Whittle were now conspicuous in runs of much merit for their respective sides, and for a moment the Bootle goal was in further jeopardy, but Jackson, aided by the backs, defended grandly. The kick out gave Williams an opportunity for displaying his dribbling powers; still Everton again secured footing in front of the visitor's goal, a shot at which just passed over the bar, as did also a “header” by Parry. Then Whittle took up the ball, and succumbing to Wood's charge, the effort was lost, as was also another's a few minutes later. After a further run by Williams, Gibson, Whittle, Grayson, and Parry contributed some excellent features of play, but none were rewarded with success. At length a run by the Bootle right gave the visitors a chance, which being thrown away, a further attack was made upon the opposing stronghold, but Jackson defended bravely, and being assisted by Sloan's fine heading, the danger was staved off, and half-time was reached with the score nil. Rogers had no sooner restarted the ball than Everton were awarded a free kick, which Evans returned with interest. Wood also put in a good flying kick, while Rogers kicked and headed superbly, and for a little pressure was put upon the Everton backs, who were, however, equal to the emergency. A free kick proved of no services to Bootle, and cheers were raised when the cupholders obtained a “corner” which being badly placed gave Bootle a kick in front of the standards. Then Gibson rushed up and made a wild shot at goal. A moment later Lindsay was hotly pressed, without however, conceding any advantage. There now ensued some splendid play, in which Gibson, Parry, Williams, and Johnson were the principal executants, while later, Evans put in an excellent saving clause. In close following Grayson missed a most favourable opportunity of scoring. The play now became of the must spirited character, both attack and defence being of the most admirable description, and try as the belligerents would they could not force the refractory ball through goal. Again Everton initiated an attack, and there was tremendous excitement as the sphere skimmed harmlessly over the bar, and thus the second half elapsed with the record still nil. It was at once decided to play the usual extra half hour, and the cupholders now having the wind in their favour commenced a series of attacks upon the visitors' citadel. At length the seize was raised, and after a well concerted run by Johnson and Williams the former lowered the Everton colours amidst tremendous cheering; but no sooner had the ball been restarted than Whittle, with a high shot equalised the score, the excitement at this moment baffling all description. During the last 15 minutes the play was of the most exciting character, but at length Parry from half-back kicked a splendid goal, thus giving Everton a leading point, which was hailed with renewed cheering. Inspired by the success, the Evertonians pressed on with additional vigour, but, notwithstanding the impetuosity of the attack, the Bootle players lost none of their vitality or presence of mind, but played up courageously to the end, and although a couple of corner kicks fell to the cupholders, they were unable to improve their advantage, and finally entered the fourth round of the competition by two goals to one, as above stated. Rogers was the best man on the field, and next to him Parry, the Everton captain, whilst the rest of the men on both sides played so excellently that it would be invidious to place one above his fellows. Teams; - Bootle; - J. Jackson, goal; R. M. Sloan and C. Evans, backs; J. McMurray, J. Rogers (captain), and F. Woods, half-backs; J. Johnston, R. E. Betts, J. E. Grayson, J. A. Eyton-Jones, and D. Williams, forwards. Everton; - C. M. Lindsay, goal; T. Marriott and R. Morris, backs; J. Pickering, M. Higgins, and W. H. Parry (captain), half-backs; W. Richards, J. McGill, Whittle, W. Finlay, and W. Gibson, forwards. Referee, Mr. A. B. Hull, Liverpool Ramblers.

BOLTON WANDERERS V EVERTON
February 5, 1885. The Manchester Courier
A match between these clubs was played on the Wanderers ground at Bolton yesterday. Everton had the assistance pof Goodall (Great lever) and the Wanderers that of Dewhurst (Preston North End), and Keenan and Scrachan (Burnley). Scoring three times in the first half and four in the second, the Wanderers won by seven goals to nothing. The goals were obtained by Hewistson (2), Dewhurst (2), Stranchan (2), and Struthers. Teams; Bolton Wanderers; Hay, goal; Parkinson and McKernan, backs; Dobson, and Keenan, half-backs; Strachan, Davenport, Struthers, Hewitson, Dewhurst and Vaughan, forwards. Everton; Joliffe, goal; Pickering and Morris, backs; Welsh, Finlay and Parry, half-backs; Goodall, Whittle, McGill, C. Jones, and Higgins, forwards. Referee; Mr. R. Roberts.

Association Game
February 7 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
The beginning of a new era in Association football in this district will date from last Saturday's match at the headquarters of the Liverpool cupholders. The event was a cup tie between Everton and Bootle, between whom there has for years existed a strong but not unfriendly rivalry, and as it was conjectured that the game would foreshadow the final issue of the competition, there was an unusually large outcome of people present; but great as was the crowd of partisans, it was remarkably orderly the most striking feature of all being its strict impartiality. So equally were the teams matched that two “forty-fives” passed over without a notch being scored. Such skill and valour was worthy of a drawn battle, but the combatants decided otherwise, preferring to play the extra half-hour. It was an eventful thirty minutes of play, and as exciting as was probably ever witnessed. Shortly after the first “fifteen” had been entered upon the Fates smiled kindly upon Bootle, and the Everton colours were lowered. A great shout went up, and the immediate supporters of Everton were speechless; but their champions never slackened in their energy, and a moment later the Bootle flag was laid in the dust amidst the wildest exultation. Again the teams changed over for the final “tug of war.” The pace, which had been fast from the commencement of the game, was still maintained, showing how highly trained were the teams. Five minutes had elapsed when the cupholders inaugurated an attack, which proved fatal to the prospects of Bootle. Jackson vainly essayed to fist out the Everton captain's final shot, but although the cupholders had the best of the subsequent play, no further encroachments upon goal were permitted, and thus Everton won a gallant and good humoured fight by two goals to one.
Todays matches
Everton v Earlestown Wanderers, at Anfield.
Wigan v Everton “A” team, at Wigan.

Wigan v Everton (“A” team)
February 10 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
Played at Wigan on Saturday, Wigan being the victors by six goals to nil. The goals were obtained by Baldwin (4), and Gee (2). Gunn in goal defended well for Everton.

Association Game
February 14 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
Everton, deputed an “A” team to oppose Wigan, but without success, as the latter team were the victors by six goals to nil. Master Baldwin scored four of the winning goals, the remainder being put through by Gee. On the whole, Everton had a most disastrous day, and the cupholders will have to show more consistent form if the trophy is to remain at the “Sandon.” A match has been arranged between Everton and Birkenhead, to be played on the ground of the latter today, the Everton team being as follows; C. M. Lindsay, goal; T. Marriott and R. W. Morris, backs; J. Pickering, W. Finlay and W. Parry half-backs; W. Richards, C. Jones, J. W. Little, J. McGill, and W. Gibson, forwards. Birkenhead; - Chambers, goal; Highet and Beynon, backs; Loukes, Owen and Martin half-backs; Turner, Hayhurst, Crellin, Stevenson, and Hartley, forwards.
Todays matches.
Birkenhead v Everton at Birkenhead
Everton 2d team v Ormskirk, at Anfield.

BIRKENHEAD V EVERTON
February 16, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
During the match between Everton and Birkenhead at Chester Street ground, Parry, the captain of the first named club, received serious injuries inwardly from a charge by one of the home team forwards. The game, consequently, was discontinued and Parry had to be carried home, but it is hoped he was very soon show favourable signs towards recovery. The spectators of the cub have received the news with intense regret, both for the player and the loss to their cup team.

St. BENDICT'S V EVERTON (Second team)
February 16, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury.
This match was played at Stanley Park on Saturday, and resulted in a victory for the Saints by two goals to nil. The forwards of Everton were not in their usual form, while their opponents displayed very neat and above passing all through, which gained them the points. For St. Benedict's the whole team played well, Parry and Raby in particularly. Of the Everton Brown, Briscoe, Richards and Oliver played best.

Birkenhead v Everton
February 16 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
Played at Chester-street on Saturday, but owing to an unfortunate accident to the Everton captain, the game was put to a stop early in the second half, the score standing at the time two to one in favour of the home team. Birkenhead won the toss, and defended the lower goal. Crellin scored early in the game, and for a long time the cupholders were unable to break the defence of the home team, the score at half-time being one each. On crossing over the visitors gave the home team some trouble, several corners falling to them, but all passing off harmlessly. The home forwards next obtained possession, and taking the ball nicely down Turner scored the second goal, the game being stopped a few minutes later for reason given above. Teams; - Everton; - Lindsay, goal; Morris and Marriott, backs; Parry Pickering, and Cartwright, half-backs; Richards, Whittle, Finlay, C. Jones, and Gibson forwards. Birkenhead; - Chambers goal; Benyon and Hignet backs; Loukes, Owen, and Harrison, half-backs; Stevenson Turner, Crellin, Hartley, and C. Martin, forwards.

Association game
February 21 st 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
Everton took on Birkenhead, who after the previous week's experience pull themselves together, and but for the unfortunate accident to Parry would have made a good bid for victory, the score standing 2 to 1 in their favour at the time of the accident. Although the play of the cupholders was not up to the standard required to retain the trophy the Cheshire men have every reason to be satisfied with the result of scoring. Birkenhead and Everton met again at the Chester-road on Tuesday neither side being fully represented a pleasant game ending in favour of the visitors by three goals to nil. G. Chambers in goal, played well for Everton. Everton and Golborne play off the remaining semi-final tie in the Liverpool competition at the Hawthorne road ground today, the selected teams being as follows; - Golborne; W. Jenkinson, goal; J. Bate (captain), and J. Waddington, backs; T. Kay, P. Redyard, and J. Clarke, half-backs; A. C. Allen, S. Morris, C. Witnall, R. Hembrough, and J. Clare, forwards. Everton; - C. M. Lindsay, goal. T. Marriott, and R. Morris, backs; M. Higgins, W. Finlay, and J. Pickering, half-backs; W. Richards, J. Whittle, John McGill, C. Jones, and W. Gibson forwards.
Todays matches
Everton v Golborne at Bootle ground

Liverpool Ramblers v Everton 2d teams, at Aigburth.
February 21, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
• Aigburth, Liverpool Ramblers v Everton (2 nd team)
• Bootle, Everton v. Golborne (Cup-tie)
The semi-final tie for the Liverpool and District cup will be played at Hawthorne-road, Bootle today. The Everton team being; C.M. Lindsay; goal; T. Marriott, and R. Morris, backs; M. Higgins, W. Finlay, and J. Pickering, half-backs; W. Richards, J. Whittle, J. McGill, C. Jones, and W, Gibson, forward.

EVFOOTBALL NOTES
February 23, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
Everton and Golborne met at Hawthorpe road, Bootle, in the semi-final tie for the local cup, but it was a one-sided match throughout, Everton winning by nine goals to nil. How the Golborne club got so far into the competition we are at aloss to understand, as their play on Saturday was wretched. W. Richards and Gibson forward, McGill centre, ad Finley and Higgins at half-back, played a splendid game for the winners.

LIVERPOOL AND DISTRICT CUP SEMI-FINAL
February 23, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
Everton v. Golborne
These clubs met on the Bootle ground, Hawthorne-road, on Saturday, before a large and enthusiastic crowd. Most of the play was in the Golborne quarters, and their goalkeeper had plenty of work. For a while after the start both sides played pretty even, but eventually W. Richards scored for Everton, after which goals were obtained in quick succession by McGill, Gibson, and Finlay, and when time was called the Evertonians retired victors by nine goals to nil. Play of the Golborne team, with the exception of the goalkeeper, was very par, while the whole of the Everton men were in excellent form. The goals were obtained by McGill (5), W. Richards (2), Finlay (1), and Gibson scored a second point, but it was disallowed. The clubs left in for the final tie are Everton and Earlestown, the former club being the winners and the latter club the runners-up last year. Teams:- Everton:- M. Lindsay, goal; T. Marriott and R. Morris, backs; M. Higgins, W. Finlay, and J. Pickering, half-backs; W. Richards, J. Whittle, right wing; J. McGill, centre; C. Jones, and W. Gibson, left wing; Golborne; W. Jenkinson, goal; J. Batey and Waddington, backs; T. Kay, P. Ridyard and J. Clarke, half-backs; Allen, and S. Morris, right wing; C. Withnall, centre; R. Hemborough and J. Clare, left wing.

Liverpool Cup
February 23 rd 1885. The Liverpool Courier
Everton v Golborne
These teams played off their semi-final tie on Saturday to decide which should enter the final, and there were about 1,500 spectators in the Bootle cricket field. Golborne won the toss, and choose to defend the Hawthorn road goal. McGill kicked off at 3-15, and some give-and-take play took place for about thirty minutes, when after a fine run by Richards on the right the movement ended with the downfall of the Golborne stronghold. McGill shortly afterwards added a scored bracket, and succeeding a splendid piece of passing and dodging by the right wing pair, Whittle centred gradually and McGill beat Jenkinson, the game standing at half-time Everton three goals to Golborne's nil. During the second half there was a continal bombardment of the Golborne goal, and six more goals were scored by Gibson, Finlay, McGill (2), and Whittle, one rebounding through the posts off Clare the Golborne back. Everton eventually winning by 9 goals to Golborne nil. Richards Whittle, McGill, Finlay and Marriott played best. Jenkinson, the Golborne goalkeeper, kept out some warm shots, and did really well considering the amount of work that fell to his share. Teams; - Everton; - C.M. Lindsay, goal; T. Marriott and R. Morris, backs; M. Higgins, W. Finlay, and J. Pickering, half-backs; W. Richards, J. Whittle, John McGill, C. Jones, and W. Gibson forwards. Golborne; - W. Jenkinson, goal; J. Bate (captain), and J. Waddington, backs; T. Kay, P. Redyard, and J. Clarke, half-backs; R. Hembrough, J. Clare, C. Withnall, A. C. Allen, and S. Morris, forwards. Referee; Mr. Douglas Lamont.

TOFFEE MARKERS AT LAW.
February 24, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury.
The case of Bannister against Woodward, just heard in the Chancery division, was interesting as penetrating the genesis and history of Everton Toffee. The plaintiff stated that she was the representive of the original inventor, being the grand-daughter of Margaret Cooper, who lived at Everton, near Liverpool, and first made and sold the sweetmeat in the original toffee shop there in 1774. The lady by her will left the goodwill of the business to go to plaintiff's aunt, Mary Cooper, on the condition that she could bring up the plaintiff and his sisters to the business. Mary Cooper on her death left, them the business and it was carried on the old house until 1884, when the house was demolished and rebuilt. A new label was there upon used, and consisted of a picture of the old house, and this was registered as a trade mark, and the plaintiff, who had purchased her sisters interest, complained that the defendant, who were confectioners in Liverpool, had sold Everton toffee with labels resembling these used by the plaintitt, and applied for an injunction. Mr. Justice Chitty said the case was a clear and obvious one for granting an injection. The defendants would be restrained from using the label containing the picture of the old Everton toffee shop.

Association Game
February 28 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier
There was a large gathering at the Hawthorn road ground to witness the concluding semi-final tie in the Liverpool competition in which Everton, holders of the district trophy and Golborne were engaged. Whilst Everton has been continually beset by misfortune in the shape of casualties to their cup team, Golborne has been playing up so well that it was generally conjectured the cupholders would have all their work cut out to pass successfully through the penultimate ordeal; but notwithstanding the absence of Parry, their captain, and of Preston good men were found to fill the gap, and to the astonishment of everyone, Everton gained an unexpectedly easy victory. For thirty minutes the play was of a fairly level character, but the moment the Golborne defence was broken through there became manifest a lack of heart and discipline, and by the time ends were changed they had lost three goals. Thereafter the country club was subjected to a persistent onslaught, and finally Everton were the victors by no fewer than nine goals to nothing and this to some extent history repeats itself, as the two combatants of last season now find themselves arrayed against each other in the final struggle for the possession of the coverted trophy, of which Mr. Councillor Houlding is at present the accredited custodian.
Today's matches
Everton v Earlestown, at Hawthorne road (final tie Liverpool Competition).
Everton v Toxteth Wanderers 2d teams at Anfield.

Liverpool Cup
March 2 nd 1885. The Liverpool Courier
Everton v Earlestown
Defeat of Everton.
A concourse of close upon 5,000 spectators assembled at the Hawthorn-road ground of the Bootle F.C. on Saturday, to witness the final contest in the Liverpool and district competition, which as last season lay between Everton and Earlestown. Unfortunately for the cupholders they were without Parry, their captain, but while Finlay occupied the half-back position with much credit to himself there can be no doubt the absence of the Everton skipper was much felt, as his counsels are always of much value in directing the play. The Earlestown had whipped up their full cup team, and it was quite evident the team had undergone a careful training. The scene altogether was one long to be remembered, and must silence the objectors to competitive football, for as regards numbers, the match was the greatest success of any ever held in Liverpool or the district, while the conduct of the vast crowd of artisans was in the main of a most exemplary character. The weather was quite spring like, but the ground notwithstanding, was somewhat soft and inclined to be holding. The Evertonians commenced the fray, and no sooner had the ball been released from the centre than it was fastened upon by the vigilant medallists, who ran it down to the Everton corner. The position, however, conferred no advantage, as Whittle and his partner, profiting by the process of “centering” ran sheer away to the Earlestown citadel, which was menaced for a length of time, Appleton in goal, and the Earlestown backs were fully equal to the emergency, and although Everton had what is termed “hard lines” in not scoring the danger vanished. Now the Earlestown men broke away, and for a time the home custodian had a lively time of it; but the danger was not of long duration, as Lindsay cleared well, and his forwards kicking placed the ball upon Earlestown citadel, which successfully withstood the shock, a goal kick eventually driving the ball to neutral quarters. At this time Pickering was rendering yeoman's service to his side, while Finlay did as much or more than was expected of him, and worthily filled the captain's position. Again the Evertonians returned to the charge, but although a contrecups befel Appleton his charge did not suffer in the slightest, as he bravely got the ball away. Half-time had nearly effuxed when Earlestown were ranged round the citadel of the cupholders, but although Lindsay was under the necessity of conceding a “corner” it passed off harmlessly and ends were changed with no goal scored by either sides. When the teams crossed over the utmost excitement prevailed especially when closely following recommencement the cupholders began to press their opponents. For about ten minutes was the pressure maintained but Earlestown recovering by the excellency of their play, a more favourable position was gained. Gradually but surely the “silver medallists” gained the upperhand, and some twenty minutes had elapsed from the resumption of play when a determined attack was inaugured against the home standards, which during a hot scrimmage was reduced, one of the Everton backs, being partially instrumental in the ball being forced through. But there was no help for it, and the momentous event as heralded with deafening cheers from the admires of Earlestown. Everton strove hard to get on level terms of equality with their determined opponents, and within almost a minute from “time” Gibson shot the ball through the Earlestown uprights, and there was a renewed of popular manifestations, but the point was protested against, and the players being adjudged off-side, the point was disallowed, and thus, after a famously contested game Earlestown became the holders of the handsome solver trophy by one goal to nothing, although it was stated that Everton have lodged a protest against the ruling of the officials. The following are the teams; - Everton; - C. M. Lindsay goal; T. Marriott and R. Morris, backs; J. Pickering, W. Finlay, and J. Preston, half-backs; W. Richards, J. Whittle, J. McGill, M. Higgins, and W. Gibson, forwards. Earlestown; - J. Appleton, goal; J. Green and R. Green, backs; J. Whalley, R. Bowker, and J. Duxbury, half-backs; W. Rich, J. Ellison, A. W. Dagnall, James Sims, and John Ogden, forwards.

Everton v Earlestown
March 3 rd 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
To the editor of the Liverpool Courier.
Sir –Being an old Football player and an ardent lover of the game, I should like to say a few words respecting the match of Saturday last between Earlestown and Everton. According to the judgement of the referee Earlestown won, but with every respect to Mr. Hull, I an inclined to think he was rather hasty in his decision. I feel quite confident of his meritorious qualifications of acting as judge, but had it not been for the prevailing excitement, in my opinion the plea of “off-side” would not have been allowed, as I never saw a fairer or more clear goal got than that kicked by young Gibson. I make these remarks entirely void of favour, not being a member of either club, and having no interest in the game whatever except love; and as I see a protest has been lodged, I hope that when the Association Committee meet they will see the necessity of causing the game to be playing over again, as I feel sure Earlestown will not be disparaged, and such a course of action will, I think, give general satisfaction –yours etc., Fairplay.

Everton v Earlestown
March 4 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
“Ramber” writes –I notice that “Fairplay” suggests through the medium of your paper that the game between the above clubs for the District Challenge Club should be played over again, owing to the dissatisfaction caused by the judgement given to the question raised of “off-side” in reference to a goal scored by Everton. As an old player and consequently an ardent admirer of the game of football, and with a desire to smooth down all jealously and ill-feeling between the rival clubs I think that the course advised by your correspondent is the only one by which a fair decision can possibly be arrived at for, should the committee decide that Earlestown are the winners, their supporters can not but feel that it was entirely owing to a “fluke” that they hold the cup for the ensuing twelve months, and Everton on the other hand will consider that an injustice (inadvertently, I am sure) has been done to them by a wrong and hasty decision on the part of the umpire. By adopting the course advocated by “Fairplay” the above mentioned undesirable result will be avoided, and the committee will have the satisfaction of knowing that they have acted in a manner which will surely bring about a just decision. On the same subject “Sheffielder” writes; - I am an old Association player, and was a disinterested spectator at the above match. I was also in a good position to see the goal claimed by Everton; but in my opinion I never saw a more palpable case of “off-side.” “Fairplay” suggests that the referee gave his decision too hurriedly. Such decisions should be given at once. In my opinion his so giving the decision showed that he had no doubt on the matter. I suppose the referee in this match was elected by the committee, before whom any protest would also come. Should the Everton club lodge a protest I would not be surprised should the committee even refuse to consider it, as I do not think they have the slightest ground to complain of the referee's decision; and this I may say, is not only my opinion, but that of several gentlemen conversant with the rules, and also uninterested spectators of the match.
To the editor of the Liverpool Courier.
Sir –With reference to the above subject set forth in a letter signed “Fairplay” may I trespass on your space to add my testimony? As a spectator, I was in a good position, being just behind the goal post, and I am not at a loss to conceive how the gentleman acting as referee could possibly give an equitable decision based on his own observation, seeing that he was not nearer at the time than midfield.
The position of the players was as follows; - The two Earlestown backs were close to the goal when the ball was passed by Richards (of Everton) from the right wing, and at the time of such passing Gibson was undoubtedly on-side, inasmuch as the back and goalkeeper were them between him and goal (see rule V1). One of the backs, possibly with the intention of trying to get the ball away as it passed him, stepped out, so that when Gibson ran in and kicked the ball between the posts only two players remained between him and goal, hence the error in the direction. I feel satisfied that a careful perusal of the above role and the facts quoted ought to convinced the most sceptical that a great injustice has been done, which I trust the committee will see their way to put right –Yours etc, Justice.

Everton v Earlestown
March 5 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
With reference to this dispute “Druid” writes in reply to “Sheffielder.” -He says that he never saw a more palpable case of “off-side” and he also says that the referee's decision should be given at once. I quite agree with him with regard to the referee, but at the same time I think that the plea for “off-side” should be given at once, and not after the goal is scored. In this case the plea was not given until after the goal was scored, and the two Green's (Earlestown backs) as well as Appleton, the goalkeeper (who said that it was a clear goal), played on the ball; and as the plea for “off-side” was not given before the goal was scored it is a fair goal. A player may foul the ball in the middle of the field and, no whistle being blown, score a goal; the referee would be bound to give it a goal. I think the above facts are very good grounds for the Everton protest, which will be heard today (Thursday) when I am sure the committee will order the match to be played over again. I was speaking to a member of Earlestown and he informs me that all Earlestown are of an opinion that it was a goal. They say they only claimed “off-side” for spite. “C.T.” writes; - Your correspondent “Justice” rightly describes the play immediately proceeding the scoring of the Everton goal but with this omission; Richards on the right wing passed the ball over towards the left, and it was taken possession of by Morris, who had come forward from his position at full back Finlay taking his place to the rear. Morris by a sidekick transferred the globe to Gibson, and the goal was scored in the manner as stated by “Justice.” Had Gibson been off-side an appeal would undoubtedly have been made at once by the Earlestown players, as they were exceedingly prompt in the matter of “claiming” but in this case no appeal was made until the goal was kicked and the ball was returning on its journey to the middle of the field. Again supposing that the referee's decision was correct, a free kick should have been awarded to Earlestown at the point Gibson received the ball. They, however, kicked out from goal. This Mr. Hull no doubt overlooked in the excitement of the moment, and I only mention the incident in order to show the tension of mind of both players and officials. Mr. Hull is chairman of the Liverpool and District F.A., and the members of the committee, out of respect they hear towards him, may feel reluctant to reverse the decision he gave. This is a very sore point I admit, but have not the slightest doubt that Mr. Hull's gentlemanly instinct will prompt him to release them from this dilemine and ask them to treat the affair as if another gentleman had been officiating in his place. I need hardly point out to your readers that in several of the Cup contests the referees' decisions have been reversed, and the ties ordered to be played over again notably in the case of Stanley and Earlestown Wanderers and Golborne and Earlestown Wanderers. After the success financially last Saturday I do not think it would be out of the way, if I suggested the establishment of a clarity cup competition by our local association. A series of matches between our four leading clubs, -Earlestown, Everton, Bootle and Ramblers –would not only be interesting, bet be the means of handing over a substantial sum to the charities of this city.

LIVERPOOL AND DISTRICT CHALLENGE CUP
March 6, 1885 The Liverpool Mercury
At a meeting of the Liverpool Football Association Committee last evening, the objection to the referee's decision against Everton in the final tie on Saturday last was considered, when it was decided, by a majority of five to four, to confirm the decision given on the field. Earlestown thus become the holders of the trophy during the ensuing year.

Everton v Earlestown
March 6 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier
At a special convened meeting of the committee of the Liverpool and District Football Association held at the Neptune Hotel, Clayton square last evening to consider the protest lodged by Everton against a decision of the referee in the match with Earlestown on Saturday last, the decision of the referee was upheld, and Earlestown thus become the holders of the Association trophy for the ensuing twelve months.

Association Game
March 7 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
At a special meeting of the committee of the Liverpool and District Association, held last night, to consider the protest judged by Everton, claiming the match as a drawn game on the ground that the goal kicked by Gibson was not “off-side” it was decided by five votes to three (the Ramblers' representatives not voting) that the referee's decision be upheld. In lodging the protest, Everton were unanimously of opinion that the goal was a good one, and in support of the numerous spectators connected with other sides whose only motive could be that of equity and fairness, and who were standing close to the players when the goal was kicked, had generously preferred to attend the meeting, and give evidence before the committee hence the protesting club considered they had an exceptionally strong case. The committee however, decided that it would be unwise to establish such a precedent, and on the evidence adduced Earlestown were declared the winners of the local trophy for the season 1884-85. In justice to Mr. Hull it may be added that whilst the lodging of the protest to persons unacquainted with the circumstances –may seem to imply a want of confidence in that gentleman's ability and fairness as a referee nothing could be more fallacious, and in proof of this Mr. Hull has not only been asked, but has very generously consented to act in the same capacity at Everton tomorrow in that club's return match v Bootle, where two very strong eleven's will be opposed to each other. The public are already familiar with the details of the match and, in common with all other well-wishes we heartily congratulate Earlestown on their success this being their second venture in the competition while last season the winning club most honorably won the silver medallists of the association, which this season, by Saturday's result, have been won by Everton.
Today's matches.
Bootle v Everton, 2d teams, at Bootle
Everton v Bootle at Anfield.

Everton v Earlestown
March 7 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
“J.C.D.” Writes; - The decision recorded in your paper of the Liverpool and District Football Association in the dispute between the Everton and Earlestown Clubs is not likely to allay the excitement and irration caused in local football circles by the unfortunate misunderstanding resulting from the match played on Saturday last. Judging from the conversation which transpired among the Earlestown players prior to their leaving the field, it was perfectly clear that they never dreamt for a moment of being able to sustain the objection of “off-side” which was obviously made because Earlestown had everything to gain and nothing to loss. A large number of the Earlestown partisans, who appeared to be supported by some of their own players, alleged that the goal was bad because it was kicked after time; but I can most emphatically asserts that the whistle was not blown for several minutes afterwards, and feel confident that every impartial spectators will bear me out in this respect. I mention this matter to show that the Earlestown men were not agreed among themselves as to why the goal obtained by Everton should be disallowed. In regard to the proceedings at the Neptune Hotel on Thursday evening, I strongly call into question their fairness. The committee of the association appointed to examine the merits of the dispute should have been composed of gentlemen whose impartiality would be above suspicious and doubt. Could such be the case when Mr. Sloan, a\ prominent Bootle player and the Earlestown umpire in the late match acted as a member of that committee? There has always existed a strong feeling of jealously and rivalry between Bootle and Everton, which would be aggravated by the fact that Everton defeated Bootle in the cup tie. It appears to me, therefore that the Bootle representative would be biased and prejudiced in the biggest degree. Smarting under the defeat inflicted by Everton on his club, he would be prejudiced; and naturally he would be interested in sustaining by his vote his own conduct and decision as umpire. As there is a strong element of doubt in the case the match ought to be played over again; and not until that course has been adopted, and Everton indisputably conquered will the Earlestown be looked upon as the champions of the association and the lawful possessors of the challenge cup.

FOOTBALL CHAIRTY MATCH
March 9, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
To the Editors of the Liverpool Mercury
Gentleman, in answer to the letter written under Non de plume of “full-back” which appeared in your column last week, I beg to make the following statement, which will, no doubt be of interest to football players and the public generally. The committee of the Everton club, at a meeting held in January, decided to play a charity match sometime in April, in aid of the funds of the Stanley Hospital, with either the Blackburn Rovers or Bolton Wanderers; and as this hospital is sadly in want of funds –being £3,000 behind and having lately increased its accommodation to the extent of 100 beds –it is earnestly hoped that the North-East clubs and the public will generously come-forward and help us to dispatch of the tickets, etc, and make this match a great financial success.

Everton v Bootle
March 9 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
These organisations met for the third time this season on the Anfield ground before an assemblage of over 2,000 spectators, and again Everton proved themselves the better team as they beat their opponents by three goals to one. Marriott won the toss, and played uphill with a breeze and run in his favour. Quickly Pollock and Whittle scored for Everton, and Jones and George for Bootle at times pressed Marriott but half-time brought no alteration to the score. The game got rather slow now, but the Bootle spectators were roused a little when Veitch, by one of his high kicks, scored a goal from midfield, and the game terminated as above. Teams; - Everton; - G. Chambers, goal; Marriott and Parkinson, backs; J. Pickering, M. Higgins, and J. Arlow, half-backs; J. Whittle, W. Richards, J. Scowcroft, J. Pollock, and J. McGill, forwards. Bootle; - J. Jackson, goal; Veitch, and C. Evans, backs; Hutton, J. Rogers, and F. Woods, half-backs; J. Stevenson, J. Dykens, S. George, J. Grayson, and A. Eyton-Jones, forwards. Referee A. B. Hull, referee.

Everton (A Team) v Bootle (2d team)
March 10 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
Played at Bootle on Saturday and resulted in a win for Bootle by three goals to two.

Everton v Bootle
March 11 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
In reference to the match Mr. H. Oliver writes; - “The team that represented Everton at Bootle on Saturday was not an “A” team as stated in your columns yesterday, but only an ordinary second time.

March 12 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
In reference to this match, J. C. Woods, captain of the B.F.C. 2d team writes; - Referece to the letter of Mr. H. Oliver in today's issue, I should like to ask him if he considers Messrs, Lindsay, Finlay, and W. George second team men, the first two having competed in the final of the Liverpool Cup competition, and the latter a district player.”

BLACKBURN ROVERS V EVERTON
March 14, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
The teams to play in this match on the Everton ground, Walton Breck-road, today, are as follows:- Blackburn Rovers; A. Woolfall, goal; G. Turner and F. Suter, backs; H. McIntyre, and J. Heys, half-backs; N. Walton and R. Fecitt, left-wing; J. Sourburthhs and A. Birthwistle, centre, J. Duckworth and J. Dougles, right-wing; Everton; G. Chambers; goal; T. Marriott, (captain), and Stewart, Brown, backs; J. Pickering, S. Arlow, half-back; J. McGill, and W. Gibson, left wing; M. Higgins, J. Whittle, centre, C. Jones, and W. Richards, right wing. Referee. Mr. Earle, Liverpool Ramblers.

Association Game
March 14 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
Ever since the introduction of the Association game into the district there has been existed the keenest rivalry between Everton and Bootle. This, no doubt had its origin in the early acquired and steadily maintained leading position of the clubs, whose periodic struggles for supremacy have always been looked forward to with marked interest. Never at any time, however, could other boast of a very decided superiority, and it is this distinctive feature which perhaps more than any other led to the surprising development which rendered practicable the confederation of the clubs of the district. Thrice during the present season have the clubs met, and, oddly each time the victory inclined to Everton, but still the margin has been a small one. Their last trial of strength occurred last Saturday, and on that occasion neither of the clubs were loth to avail themselves of a little friendly aid. This becoming known, the Anfield enclosure was filled with an excited throng which was not slow in demonstrating how large the following of the ex-cupholders still is. A hard game was played, and Everton, having the best of it, were returned the victors by three goals to one, a more substantial victory than fell to their lot in either of the previous matches of the season. Today at Anfield Everton will be opposed by a strong first team of Blackburn Rovers, as the home interest will be well represented the game is sure to be arouse an extraordinary amount of interest. The teams are as follows; - Everton; - C. Chambers, goal; T. Marriott (captain) and Stewart Brown, backs; J. Pickering, and J. Arlow, half-backs; J. McGill, W. Gibson, M. Higgins, J. Whittle, C. Jones, and W. Richards, forwards. Blackburn Rovers; - A. Woolfall, goal; G. Turner, and F. Suter, backs; H. McIntyre, and J. Heys, half-backs; N. Walton, H. Fecitt, J. Sourbutts, A. Birtwistle, J. Duckworth, and J. Douglas, forwards.

Several writes have recently been pleading on behalf of the cause of charity, and it is satisfactory to learn that the Everton club have already taken the initiative in that direction. Recent events have contributed to make the Anfield enclosure a popular arena, and should the Evertonians succeed, as is contemplated in enlisting the sympathies of one of the leading Lancashire clubs, great success will unquestionably attend the effort.
Today's matches
Everton v Blackburn Rovers at Anfield
Anfield v Everton 2d team, at Stanley Park.

First advertisement located in Courier
Grand Football Match : Blackburn Rovers 1 st v Everton 1 st –at Anfield. This day (Saturday). Admission 6d.

EVERTON V BLACKBURN ROVERS
March 16, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
This match was played on the ground of the Everton club, on Saturday. Arlow and Brown, who ought to have played in the inter-city match at Manchester, stayed at home and assisted Everton, whilst the Rovers only had a moderate team, four of their men being engaged in the international match at Blackburn Rovers, and Suter disappointed them at the last moment, so they played ten men. The East Lancashire team had a far harder task than they anticipated, and won an interesting match by two goals to one.

Blackburn Rovers v Everton
March 16 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
This match was played at Anfield on Saturday, and was the means of bringing together a very large crowd, numbering about 2,500. Much disappointment was caused by the non-appearance of Suter, McIntyre, and Walton with the Rovers team. McIntyre, however, was unwell, and therefore not able to play, but Suter was in Liverpool early on Saturday morning, and the reason of his and Walton's absence was not even known to the rest of the Rovers, who had to play with 10 men only. Marriott won the toss, and played with the sun at his back. Douglas kicked off, and Sowerbutts and Fecitt made tracks for the Everton goal, but were intercepted by Pickering. Whittle and Richards returned the attack, and Egan, Fecitt, and Sowerbutts raced down the left, and after about twenty minutes' play Sowerbutts scored the first point for the Rovers. No further score was made up to half-time. When ends had been changed Fecitt, from a corner kick scored a beautiful goal, and directly afterwards Everton scored a goal, and the whistle sounding soon after the game terminated as above. Arlow and Whittle played well for Everton, whilst Fecitt and Sowerbutts were the best of the Rovers. Teams; - Everton; - Chambers goal; Marriott and Stewart-Brown, backs; Pickering, Darham, and Arlow, half-backs; Whittle, Gibson, Richards, McGill, and Higgins, forwards. Rovers; - Woolfall, goal; Turner and Blenkhorn, backs; Barton, and Heys, half-backs; Douglas, Duckworth, Birkwistle, Fecitt, and Sowerbutts, forwards. Mr. Earle Liverpool Ramblers, referee.

Association Game
March 21 st 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
Another hugh and enthusiastic crowd thronged the Anfield enclosure on Saturday in honour of the visit of the Blackburn Rovers, who, however, turned up one short of their numbers, while Everton had the services of Stewart-Brown in lieu of Morris. Of course nobody expected that Everton would win, the question being as to whether the local men would give the visitors a good game. In this respect the supporters of Everton were abundantly satisfied. For when the time arrived for changing ends only Fecitt had placed a goal to the credit of the Rovers. Afterwards Sowerbutts added a second point, but so well did Everton play up that this was their last. Time was fast wearing on, when Higgins perceived an opening and sent in a shot, which even Wolfall could not stop. This success, it is needness to say, was applauded to the echo, and although no further point was recorded, it was generally admitted that the Evertonians had come well out of the ordeal.
Today's matches.
Everton v Liverpool Ramblers, at Anfield
Everton 2d team v St. George's at Stanley Park

LIVERPOOL RAMBLERS V EVERTON
MARCH 23, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
Played on Ramblers had a strong team, while, on the other hand, Everton were rather poorly represented, and the visitors won by 4 goals to 1.
Everton (Second) v. Gymnasium
This match was played at Sefton Park on Saturday. Everton won by 3 goals t 1.

Liverpool Ramblers v Everton
March 23 rd 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
This match was played at the Everton ground, Anfield, on Saturday, before about 600 or 700 spectators. With one or two exceptions the teams appeared on the ground as advertised. Everton were unfortunate in having Whittle on the sick list and Chambers also was not well, thus placing them at a decided disadvantage. Besides this the team was so disarranged that the players lost all combination, and made only a very poor show. Smith scored three goals for and Evans one for Ramblers, and McGill scored the only goal obtained by Everton. Teams; - Ramblers; - H. bailey goal; E. Stewart-Brown, and G. W. Turner, half-backs; Stott, W. Grimsdale, and A. B. Hall, half-backs; A. Evans R. Winters, D. Earles G. Smith, and A. Withers, forwards. Everton; - G. Chalmers, goal; T. Marriott, and R. W. Morris, backs; W. Finlay, J. Pickering, and W. Gibson, half-backs; E. Berry, C. Jones, W. Richards, McGill, and M. Higgins, forwards.
Liverpool Gymnasium v Everton (2d team)
This match was played on Saturday at Sefton park, and after a rather one sided game resulted in favour of Everton by three goals to one. For Everton Gunn in goal, Pickup and Richards backs, and Brown and Dillon forwards, played best; whilst Welsh, Milroy Hood, and Evans, were the best of the Gymnasium. Teams; - Gymnasium; Hood, goal Dolby and Milroy, backs; Welsh, Bennett, and Sugden, half-backs; Hedley, Uffleman, Evans, Conning and Marriott forwards. Everton; - Gunn, goal; Oliver, and Preston, backs; Pickup, Richards, and Mowbray, half-backs; Scott, Williams, Brown, Brettell, and Lindsay, forwards.

Association Game
March 28 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
The Ramblers have waited long and patiently for the turn in the tide of their fortune, and so it happens that, just within hail of the close of the season, they effected a rare coup in defeating Everton, on their own ground, too, at Anfield. True it is that the ex-cupholders had not quite their best representation, while Chambers in goal was in indifferent health; but still the Ramblers are entitled to every credit for beating them by four goals to one which is a satisfactory set-off for the defeat they sustained at Aigburth a couple of months ago.
Today's matches.
Darwen Old Wanderers v Everton, at Darwen
Everton 2d team v Liver, at Walton.
Everton 3d team v Christ Church at Bootle.

EVERTON V DARWEN OLD WANDERERS
March 30, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
These teams met at Darwen on Saturday. The visitors sent a very poor combination and were defeated by 7 goals to nil.

Blackburn Rovers v Everton
April 4 th 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
A large concourse of spectators assembled to witness the match between these powerful organisations, at Anfield yesterday, some 3000 being present. In the first half of the game the play was of a very even character, and neither side scored; but in the second half, Everton, after a clever exhibition dribbling and passing by Higgins (who with McGill, were conspicuous for good play throughout the game) scored the only goal obtained and won the match.

Association game
April 4 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
This Eastertide the football loving public of Liverpool will have their appetite fully satisfied by the menu provided for them by the Everton club. Today at the Anfield enclosure Everton will receive a first visit from Witton, a club hailing from the Blackburn district; while on Monday next the famous Blackburn Olympic will bring over to Liverpool their full cup team which includes three international players and four country players to do battle against a strong combination of Everton. This, of course, is the most attractive match of the series, and the fact having been made known the “light blues” are assured of a hearty welcome on the occasion of their holiday visit to the second city of the empire.
Todays matches.
Everton v Witton, at Anfield
Everton 2d team v Eagley, 2d teams at Eagley
Monday
Everton v Blackburn Olympic at Anfield

Everton v Witton
April 6 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier. A large and enthusiastic crowd, numbering about 2,000 persons, assembled at the Anfield enclosure on Saturday to witness the play by these teams. The game was closely contested from start to finish, the result being a win for the visitors by one goal to nil. This was mainly due to the splendid goalkeepering of Sharples, the visitor's custodian, who saved his goal repeatedly in gallant style. During the first half of the game, thew visitors had the best of the play, and Yates scored a goal for them. Afterwards the Evertonians played up better, but could not get on level terms of equality with their clever opponents. Everton having kicked off, Witton rushed up to their adversary's goal, and Lindsay had to fist out. Everton than removed the play down-field and gained a “corner” which passing off harmlessly the visitors again took the sphere to the Everton quarters, and notched a goal Yates scoring another shortly afterwards, which was disallowed for “off-side play.” Witton then had a lively time of it in front of their uprights. Everton being within an ace of scoring, but the goalkeeper and backs finally checked the attack, nothing resulting beyond a corner, which was got away safely. The Witton men now played a splendid passing game, their kicking being also exceedingly fine, but nothing further was scored before half-time. On restarting Witton kicked off, play for a time remaining in midfield, where a series of kicking exchanges ensued. Everton then took the globe up the field, but Higgins shot outside a “corner” following which, however, proved fruitless. On restarting Everton got a “foul” for “hands” right in front of the visitor's goal, but the goalkeeper cleared the danger. Witton next had a turn, but Pickering relieved with a timely kick. The play now became of a remarkably energetic character, but citadels being besieged in turn, but without effect. Witton then had a “corner” when Higgins, getting possession sped up the visitors' left, finally transferring the leather to Pickering whose shot unfortunately went wide of its mark. Gibson and McGill here put in some fine play for the home team, who had very hard lines on several occasions in not scoring, and eventually Witton won a hard game by one goal to nothing. The following are the teams; - Witton; - Sharples goal; Smith and Pickering, backs; Monk, Ashley, and Turner half-backs; Haresnape, Bretmard, Arnold, Yates, and Goodwin, forwards. Everton; - Lindsay, goal; J. McGill, and Preston, backs; Pickering, Higgins, and Finlay, half-backs; Powell, Gibson Jefferson, Whittle, and Richards, forwards.

EVERTON V WITTON
April 6, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
Representative teams of these clubs met at the enclosure of the former on Saturday last, in magnificent weather, and about 2,000 spectators witnessed a game of which Witton had all the best in the first half, and they scored one goal. Everton played better in the second half, but were unable to equalise matters, and were thus defeated by a goal to nothing. Teams:- Everton; Lindsay, goal; G. “Arnott” and McGill, backs; Pickering, Preston, and Higgins, half-backs; Powell, Gurley, Richards, Whittle, and Gibson, forwards. Witton; Sharples, goal; Smith and Pickering, backs; Monk, Hartley, and Turner, half-backs; Haresnape, Brennand, Goodwin, Yates and Arnull, forwards.
Everton played a team of the Blackburn Rovers on Friday, at Anfield and succeeded in beating then by one goal to nil, while on Saturday they were pitted against Witton, but this time suffered by 1 goal to nothing. Today the first team of the Blackburn Olympic play at Everton at Anfield, and from the appended list of players it will be seen that the home team will be well represented. Teams; Everton; Chambers, goal; Smith (Witton) and Parkinson, backs; Pickering, McGill, and Dobson, half-backs; Jefferson, Powell, Higgins, Richards, and Whittle, forwards. Blackburn Olympic; Southworth, goal; Beverley, Ward, backs; Hunter (captain), Gibson and Astbury, half-backs; Yates, Costley, Dewhurst, Parker, and Whitehead, forwards.

EVERTON V BLACKBURN OLYMPIC
April 7, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
The great local event of yesterday was the visit of the “famous light blues” to the Anfield enclosure, which was played with the interested crowd numbering close upon 3,000 persons. Contrary to expectation, Costley turned up, and this the Olympic were enabled to keep faith with the public, placing in the field their full cup, while Everton had the services of Dobson, of the Bolton Wanderers, whose back play throughout was irrepractable. The start was set down for three o'clock, but it was half-an-hour beyond that time when Higgins gave motion to the ball. The Olympic quarters were at once invaded, when the value if Southworth's goalkeeper was amply demonstrated. Yates and Costly at once became active, and danger having been cleared by the efforts of McGill and Chambers, Richards effected a capital run along the Everton right, which, however, received a timely check, and shortly afterwards Dewhurst headed the ball through the Everton upright and scored the first goal for the Olympic, some 17 minutes having elapsed from the commencement of the game. From now to half-time the game was equally contested; but had the shooting of the home players been more accurate. Everton might have obtained a record: but when ends were changed the Olympic, after 45 minutes' hard play, had only a goal to their credit. On changing over, Everton had to face the hill and, as at the re-commencement of play, there was a little disorganisation in their ranks. Dewhurst speedily augmented the visitors, but this would never have occurred only for a piece of bad play on the part of McGill. No sooner had the sphere been re-started then Yates added a third goal, and matters began to assume an ominous aspect for the home players. The Evertonians, however, pulled themselves together, and from now to the end of the game some really fine play was witnessed in which Dobson and Higgins in behalf of Everton and Costley and Dewhust for the Olympic greatly distinguished themselves. Once Whittle, during the subsequent play, but the ball through the Olympians goals, but on appeal the point was not allowed in consequence of an act of off-side play. This, of course, was an unfortunate accident for Everton, and only served to stimulate their opponents to greater exertions; but try as they would, attack after attack was repulsed, whilst the local men figured pretty conspicuously at times, but when chances came in their way their shooting was faulty, and thus, after va capital game, victory rested with the Blackburnians by three goals to nothing. Team;- Everton; Chambers, goal; McGill and Dobson, backs; Pickering, Welsh, and Sutton, half-backs; Richards, Whittle, Higgins, Powell, and Gurley, forwards. Blackburn Olympic; Southworth, goal; Beverley and Ward, backs; Gibson, Hunter, (captain), and Astley, half-backs; Dewhurst, Whitehead, Parker, Yates, and Costley, forwards. Umpires, Messrs Gunning, and Woodruffe; referee, Mr. T. Evans.

Everton v Blackburn Olympic
Everton (A team) v twenty two veterans
April 8 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier
Before 400 spectators this match was played on Good Friday morning (April 3). The veterans won the toss and played down hill, Everton kicking off at 10-50. The Veterans at once bore down on the Everton goal, but the backs defended well. The eleven then by some good passing on the right got the ball into the Veterans end a good shot being well saved by Bargery, who played a good game between the posts, saving many a well aimed shot. The eleven did all the pressing, F. Wills at back putting in some good work, but after 35 minutes' play the eleven scored from the foot of Williams. After this the Veterans tried hard to score Joliffe having to save shots from W. Marriott, Walsh, and Mylie. The eleven again took up the running and scored again which brought half-time the score being Everton 2 Veterans 0. The Veterans now began to tire, and Everton did all the pressing W. Dry at back working hard to stave off the attacks of the eleven, but all to no purpose. They added five more goals this half and the Veterans by a combined run, between Jackson, A. Willis Walsh, and Wilmott ended in the latter scoring their only goal, Everton thus winning by 7 to 1.

Association Game
April 11 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
The three matches played by Everton during the holidays both as regards the character of the play and attendance were a complete success, for 7,000 or 8,000 persons having witnessed the games with the Blackburn Rovers Witton, and Blackburn Olympic. An extra fixture has been arranged with Crewe Alexandra, and this will be played at Anfield enclosure today, the team selected to represent Everton being as follows; - C. Lindsay, goal; T. Marriott and J. McGill, backs; J. Pickering, W. Finlay, and J. Preston half-backs; W. Richards, Jefferson, W. Gibson, Farmer, and Higgins, forwards.

EVERTON V CREW ALEXANDRA
April 11, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
These clubs meet in the Everton ground today, when the following will represent Everton –Lindsay, goal; Marriott and McGill, backs; Pickering, Finley, and Preston, half-backs; Richards, Jefferson, right wing; Gibson, Farmer, left-wing, centre. Higgins.

Everton v Crewe Alexandra
April 13 th 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
These clubs met on Saturday at Anfield, before a fair number of spectators Higgins kicked off, and soon hostilities was transferred to the visitors' quarters where most of the play took place but it was not until after half an hour's play that Pickering with a long quick shot, succeeded in scoring the first goal. Just before half-time Gibson added to second point. On changing ends Everton still pressed the visitors, and Farmer put the leather through, but Crewe claimed “off-side.” The referee appeared to give the point in favour of Everton, whereupon several of the Crewe players left the ground, but they were induced to return, the point not being pressed by Everton. Higgins put on another goal in the second half and eventually Everton won by three goals to nil. The majority of the home team played well, and Crewe were completely outworked. the only two who worked well being Pearson on the wing, and Henshall in goal. Teams; - Everton; - Lindsay, goal; Marriott, and McGill, backs; Pickering, Finlay and Dobson half-backs; Jefferson, and Richards, right wing; Farmer and Gibson left wing; Higgins, centre forward. Crewe Alexandra; - Henshall, goal; Conde, and Downes, backs; Bell (captain), Wycherley, and Heeler, half-backs; Price, and Pearson, right wing; Taylor, and Snelson, left wing; Edwards, centre forwards.

More information
Everton and Crewe Alexandra were pitted together on Saturday at Anfield, but the home team had the best of the play throughout, and won by 3 goals to nil. The new acquistions –Dobson, Farmer, Jefferson, and Finlay –made most of the play for the Evertonians though Pickering, Gibson, and Higgins did very well. Pickering obtained the first point from a splendid long shot, and the second one, by Gibson, was well put through but Higgins had not much difficulty in scoring the third. The Crewe forwards were far too clumsy with the exception perhaps, of Pearson, who played an excellent unselfish game throughout, and a word of praise is also due to Henshall whose splendid goalkeeping saved the visitors from a much worse defeat, as he kept shot after shot out in meritorious styles. It is only fair to state that Crewe were minus several of their best players. Everton have not yet concluded their season, but in the 32 matches played so far they have won 18, lost 10, and drawn 4. They have scored 80 goals against 63 by their opponents. The club were unfortunate in losing the services of their then captain Mr. Parry, just at a time when their needed his help most and the holders of the

Everton v Haydock Temperance
April 21 st 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
This match was played on Saturday at Haydock for the benefit of the Haydock Cottage Hospital and as there were about 1500 spectators present a goodly sun was reaslied. Everton had the advantage of the wind during the first half, and scored six goals to Haydock none. In the second half the home team played up well, and aided by the wind scored twice. The visitors added two more goals, and won by eight goals to two. Everton were without Marriott, Dobson, and Pickering, and Whittle, who were hurt early in the second half of the game, kept goal, Lindsay taking his place forward. The goals were got by Farmer (three) Jefferson (two), Gibson (two), and McGill.

SERIOUS ACCIDENT TO A FOOTBALL SECRETARY
April 25, 1885. The Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser
During a game at the Anfield Ground on Saturday, between an “A” of Everton and a team representing the Association clubs playing in Stanley Park. Mr. F. Brettle., hon, secretary of the Everton club, fell, and had his leg so badly broken at the ankle as to necessitate his removal to the Royal Infirmary. The game had only been in progress for a few minutes, and the mishap was of a purely accidental character. Play was at once abandoned, the greatest sympathy being evinced for the injured player, who is well known to Lancashire and Cheshire Association clubs.

April 28 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
Preston Zincari v Everton
In this match at Anfield ground today, Everton will be represented as follows; - Lindsay, goal, Marriott and McGill backs; Pickering, Finlay, and Preston, half-backs; Whittle, Jefferson, Gibson, Farmer, and Higgins, forwards.

ACCIDENT TO A LIVERPOOL FOOTBALL PLAYER
April 29, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
While the 2 nd eleven of the Everton were playing a match with another local club on Saturday afternoon, at Anfield, Mr. F.E. Brettle, the well known secretary of the Everton Football club, received an accidental kick from one of the players which broke his leg. He was removed to the Royal Infirmary, where he was attended by Dr. Bostoch, one of the house surgeons, and is now progressing. That match was abandoned.

Everton v Preston Zingari
May 2 nd 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
These clubs met on Saturday at Anfield. Everton with the wind in their favour scored 5 goals in the first half, and putting on another point in the second half eventually won by 6 goals to nil.

NOVEL FOOTBALL COTEST I LIVERPOOL
May 4, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
On Saturday evening, an interesting contest under Association rules, took place at the Liverpool Gymnasium, before a large company of spectators. The “field of play” was 28 yards in length by about 10 yards, and seven teams of four players each entered the lists, as follows; Everton, Everton B, Bootle, Bootle B, Southport, Stanley and Liverpool Gymnasium. The Liverpool Ramblers, but did not compete. Mr. ER. E. Lythgoe, honorary secretary of the Liverpool and District Association was referee, and the awards were as follows- Gymnasium, beat Everton B, 1 goal to nil; Southport beat Bootle 1 goal t nil; Everton beat Bootle B; Stanley beat Gymnasiums 1 goal to nil. The semi-final and final tiers will be played off at the Gymnasium this evening when the Worship the Major of Liverpool will present the district cup and medals to Earlestown ad Everton winners and runners up during the past season.

EVERTON FC
Athletic News -Tuesday 05 May 1885
It is stated on most reliable authority that Mr. Councillor Houlding, who is president of the Everton A.F.C, has purchased at a cost of £6,000 the conveniently-situation Anfield ground, recently enclosed by this club, and that Everton will be granted a lease at a rental of £100 per annum. this is strong evidence of the enterprising spirit of Association players in the Liverpool district, where there are now three capital enclosed grounds in the hands of strong clubs.

 HOULDING PURCHASING ANFIELD
The Athletic News, May 5, 1885
It is stated on most reliable authority that Mr. Councilor Houlding, who is president of the Everton A.F.C, has purchased at a cost of $6,000 the conveniently situated Anfield Ground, recently enclosed by the club, and that Everton will be granted a lease at a rental of $100 per annum.  This is strong evidence of the enterprising spirit of Association players in the Liverpool district, where there are now three capital enclosed grounds in the hands of strong clubs. 

Everton v Blackburn Rovers
May 11 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
These teams met at Blackburn on Saturday, and after a very pleasant game Everton were declared the victors by two goals to one. Gibson and Farmer scored for Everton, and Walton for the Rovers. Teams; - Everton; - Chambers goal; Marriott and Dobson, backs; Pickering, Finlay and Welsh, half-backs; Whittle, M. Higgins, Farmer, Fairhurst, and Gibson, forwards. Blackburn Rovers; - Wilson goal; Shorrock and Bleakborn, backs; J. Forrest, Hays, and Greyson, half-backs; Walton, Sourbutts, Fecitt, Birtwistle, and Roberts, forwards.

BLACKBURN ROVERS V EVERTON
May 11, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
These teams met at Blackburn on Saturday, but the Rovers were not seen at their best and were defeated after a pleasant game by 2 goals to 1. The first half, in which Farmer and Welsh international player, distinguished himself very much, passed over without any goals being scored. Ends having been changed, Gibson after some nice passing scored for Everton. Soon afterwards Farmer added a second goal. Eventually Watson sent in a shot which Chambers failed to stop, and the game terminated as above stated. Teams; - Everton; - Chambers goal; Marriott and Dobson, backs; Pickering, Finlay and Welsh, half-backs; Whittle, M. Higgins, Farmer, Fairhurst, and Gibson, forwards. Blackburn Rovers; - Wilson goal; Shorrock and Bleakhorn, backs; J. Forrest, Hays, and Greyson, half-backs; Walton, Sourbutts, Fecitt, Birtwistle, and Roberts, forwards.

Earlestown v Everton
May 18 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
The above teams met at Anfield on Saturday. After a very quite game Everton were victors by three goals to none. Everton won the toss, and elected to play with the sun and a strong wind behind them. The ball was soon carried into Earlestown's quarters, and Champion was kept busy. A neat pass from Scott to McGill, however, proved to much for him, the ball being put through by the latter four minutes from the commencement of the game. After restarting the game became more evenly contested, but before the call of half time Farmer, who played with his usual dash, managed to score goal number two. In the second half although the wind had gone down considerably, Everton had matters pretty much their own way, the ball seldom getting past midfield. The forwards, however, seemed to be completely at sea, the attempts at goal being wretched. Shortly before the call of time Gibson managed to score the third point for Everton. Teams; - Earlestown; - Champion goal; Lord and Selby backs; R. Johnson, J. Lowe, and W. Allison, half-backs; F. Knowles, J. Thompson, W. Dales, W. Shaw, and J. Shaw, forwards. Everton; - Jolliffe, goal; Marriott and W. Brown, backs, Finlay, Higgins, and Pickering half-backs; Scott, W. Richards, Gibson, Farmer, and McGill, forwards.

EVERTON V EARLESTOWN WANDERERS
May 18, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
The above teams met on Saturday last, on the Anfield ground. Everton lost the toss, and had to kick against the wind; but McGill and Farmer managed to put two goals on when half-time was called. In the second half Everton again pressed the visitors, but could only get the leather through once, Finlay, Farmer, and McGill were in grand form. Everton won by three to nothing. Next Saturday Everton play a match against a picked Liverpool team at Anfield in aid of the Stanley Hospital . the teams are; Everton; Lindsay; Marriott, and Dobson; backs; Pickering, Higgins and Finlay, half-backs; Farmer, Fecitt, Jefferson, Whittle, and Sourbutts, forwards. Liverpool; Jackson, goal; Veitch, and McCallum, backs; Gailbrait, Wilson, and Woods, half-backs; Hutton, Morris, Eyton Jones, Smith, and McGregor, forwards.

THE ANNUAL MEETING
May 21, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury.
The annual general meeting of the Everton Football Club was held at the Sandon Hotel, Anfield on Monday evening about 100 members being present. Mr. J. Houlding, C.C. presided and was supported by Messrs, Berry and Jackson, vice-presidents. The secretary's annual report was readed by Mr. T. Higgins, who has acted in the absence of Mr. Brettel, and afterwards the treasurer submitted his financial statement-Mr. Houlding said he had purchased the ground now enclosed. He hoped full justice would be done by the public to the grand match to be played on Saturday between Everton and a picked team of the Liverpool clubs. The following officers were elected for the ensuing season; President (Mr. John Houlding), seven vice-presidents, three auditors, and the usual committee; captain first team, F.W. parry; vice captain, Mr. Higgins; Captain second team J. Douglas; vice captain W. Brown; secretary F. Brettel; assistant secretary T. Higgins; Treasurer, W. Gunning. Saturday's teams in the match Everton v. Liverpool are as follows; Everton; Lindsay, goal; Dobson, and Marriott, backs; Finlay, Higgins, and Pickering; half-backs; Farmer and Fecitt, left- wing; Jefferson and Whittle, right wing; Sourbutts, centre forward. Liverpool; Jackson goal; Veitch and McAllum, backs; Galbraith, Wilson, and Woods, half-backs; Smith, McGregor, Hutton, Morris, and Eyton Jones, forwards.

Association Game
May 23 rd 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
We are now approaching the end of May, and still football holds on the even tenour of its way. Today a match of exceptional interest will be played at Anfield, the headquarters of Everton, the opposing team being picked from the Liverpool clubs, while Everton will be assisted by several of the Blackburn Rovers. The match has been arranged for the purpose of replenishing the coffers of Stanley Hospital which sorely needs such aid, and might have received it ere now if other members of the football community had been as charitably disposed as are the Association of Liverpool. But with some people it is always “too late.” Mr. Councillor Holding as president of the Everton club will kick off in the presence of the Mayor and several members of the Corporation who have kindly promised to attend; while with such an array of combating talent the occasion will be altogether an interesting one. The selected teams are as follows; - Everton; - Lindsay, goal; Marriott, and Dobson backs; Pickering, Higgins, and Finlay, half-backs; Farmer, Fecitt, Jefferson, Whittle, and Sourbutt, forwards. Liverpool; Bailey (Ramblers), goal; Veitch (Bootle), and McCallum (Stanley), backs; Gailbrath (Bootle), Wilson (Stanley) and Woods (Bootle), half-backs; Hutton (Bootle), Morris (Cambrian) Eyton-Jones (Bootle), Smith (Ramblers), and McGregor (Stanley), forwards. Prior to the match Mr. Councillor Houlding will entertain his Worship the Mayor and a select company to lunch at his residence Stanley House, Stanley-park. Next Saturday a match will be played at the Anfield ground between Liverpool District v East Lancashire District.

FOOTBALL MATCH IN AID OF THE STANLEY HOSPITAL
May 25 1885. The Liverpool Mercury
Everton 5, Liverpool District 3
A football match in aid of the funds of the Stanley Hospital, one of the most deserving and necessitous charities of the city, took place at Anfield on Saturday afternoon. It has already been clearly shown that the demands upon the resources of the institution are not met by the provision which is now in existence, and the gentlemen most deeply interested in its welfare are making effort to place “Stanley” in a position which will largely meet the requirements of the rapidly-extending district in which it is situated. The hospital has at present accommodation for 104 beds, but the finances at the command of the committee are in such a position that only half the wants of applicants can be met. A debt of £3,000 rests on the institutation and until this is paid off it will be impossible to increase the number of beds. Charitable efforts are all the more necessary from the fact that the grand gala and bazaar which the committee intended holding in Stanley Park next year in Whit-week will have to be put off for another year in consequence of the Navigation Exhibition which is now being arranged for, and the committee accordingly appeal to the public for more liberal support than has hitherto been accorded to the hospital; and their appeal it is hoped will not be in vain. Mr. John Houlding who has shown a deep interest in the hospital has given a practical illustration of how a game measures the funds of the charity can be easily assisted by the public. As president of the Everton Football Club, he arranged for a series of football matches to come off on the ground of that club, the gate money taken at these matches to be handed over to the treasurer of the hospital. The first of these came off on Saturday afternoon between teams from the Everton and Liverpool clubs, and was watched with much interest by a large number of people. The company included his worship the Mayor (Alderman David Radcliffe), who with a number of other gentlemen interested in the hospital, was, prior to the match entertained to luncheon by Mr. Houlding, at his resident, Stanley House, Stanley Park. Mr. Holding's guest besides the Mayor, were Councillors G.C. Dobell, G. Peet. PH. Rathbone, E. Parull, and J. Woodcock; the Rev Canon Lester (chairman of the hospital); Mr. L.E. Bennett (hon treasurer), Messrs C. Wynne, J. Parrington, Dr. Costline, Sheldon and Barr &c. The match was opened shortly after half past three o'clock, when Mr. Houlding, as president kicked off amid loud applause. During the usual interval Mr. Houlding in a few appropriate remarks, introduced the Mayor to the players, observing that the Mayor had given evidenced of the deep interest he took, not only in the hospital, but in the game, by coming there at considerable personal inconvenience to witness the match. His Worship, who was cordially cheered both by the players and the public expressed the pleasure be felt at securing once more the Old English game of football being followed by the young, the healthy, and the strong. It was also extremely gratifying to the friends of the Stanley Hospital to see the strong thus coming forward to help the weak and those suffering from ill-health and accident and he was sure the funds of the institution would be much increased by their efforts that day. The hospital was not situated in the city itself, in the midst of the wealthy and the rich but amongst the working classes –those whom it was intended to benefit; and therefore it behoved not only the wealthy, but the working classes also, to put their shoulder to the wheel and help the institution in whatever way they could. It was very pleasing to see votaries of football give their service so freely in aid of the hospital, and he hoped by this and other means to see the Stanley Hospital are long placed out of debt. (Applause). Play was then resumed. The next match in aid of the hospital takes place tomorrow, when the Bolton Wanderers will be the opposing team. The contestants in the Charitable Match were the Everton Club and a combined team selected from the Liverpool football clubs. The weather was not over-inviting but still there was a large gathering of spectators, upwards of 2,000 persons being present. Both sides were well represented, especially that of Everton, which had the assistance of several leading members of the Blackburn Rovers first team. Shortly after the advertised time Mr. Councillor Houlding as president of the Everton club, put the ball in motion, after which Gibson on behalf of the home eleven, kicked off, when the sphere at once found its way to the Liverpool end of the field. Eyton-Jones at once became prominent; but although nothing immediately came of it, Hutton, after a brief interval, was enabled to level an abortive shot at goal. Pressure at the Everton end was maintained, and although Marriott relieved, Morris promptly returned to the attack, and succeeded in placing the first goal for Liverpool. Favoured by the wind, the visitors were still enabled to keep up a very considerable degree of pressure; although Everton chiefly through the instrumentality of Fecitt, Higgins, Farmer and Dobson, were enabled occasionally to break away, but their shooting at goal was lacking in precision. Eventually Hutton became conspicuous and a little later Morris sent in a shot which Lindsay unfortunately for his side passed through his own goal thus adding a second point for Liverpool, shortly after which the whistle signalled half-time. Immediately upon restarting Bailey was called upon to defend his charge but although for a time this was successfully accomplished. Farmer sent in a shot which completely upset the Liverpool custodian. Shortly afterwards the same player enabled Douglas to register a second goal, while hardly a minute had elapsed when Pickering added a third, this last feat being signall for a general outburst of appreciative cheering. The Evertonians were now being materially aided by the wind, and although a rainstorm swept over the ground the game was continued with unabated vigour. Fecitt was now seen in some exceedingly fine play, while Higgins was also playing exceptionally well. The Evertonians had gained the upperhand by this time, and after Higgins had driven the ball against the crossbar, Pickering rushed up and scored the fourth goal for Everton. The Liverpool men now made a determined effort to retrieve their position, and were so far successful that after a few minutes further play, Wilson, as the result of a judicious crossover by Morris, scored a magnificent goal from half-back. The play now became most exciting, but again the Evertonians loyally answered the call of their captain, and finally Douglas who was well aided by Whittle, inaugurated a further attack upon the unfortunate Liverpool fortress, which for the fifth time was reduced, Farmer being credited with the concluding point scored in the game. Afterwards Dick, Suter, Hutton, and Douglas exhibited fine play for their respective sides, and when the whistle blew for the cessation of play a well-earned victory remained with Everton by five goals to three. The following were the teams;- Everton:- M. Lindsay, goal; T. Marriott, (Captain) and F. Suter (Blackburn Rovers), backs; J. Pickering, M. Higgins, and Dobson, half-backs; Douglas, and Whittle, right wing; Fecitt,, centre, Farmer, and W. Gibson, left wing. Liverpool; H.A. Bailey (Ramblers) (captain), goal; T. Veitch (Bootle) and A. McCallum (Stanley), backs; G. Galbraith (Bootle), W. Wilson and Dick (Stanley), half-backs; W. George (St. Mary's) and T. Morris (Cambrian), right wing; McGregor, (Stanley), centre; J. Eyton-Jones and G. Hutton (Bootle), left-wing. It is probable that the anticipations of the promoters of the match will be fully realised, and that at least £100 will be handled over to the treasurer of Stanley Hospital.

Grand charity match at Anfield in aid of Stanley Hospital
May 25 th 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
Everton v United clubs of Liverpool.
Hitherto it has been a rare occurrence for our leading clubs to meet in friendly rivalry for the benefit of local charitable institutions. It would almost seen that they have been too ready to display their prowess for the somewhat empty honours of victory without taking advantage of their own popularity and the attractiveness of our national winter game to help forward philanthropic movements. This, it is well known, has not been due to any want of sympathy on the part of football players individually. It can only be attributed to one cause –a cause which too often hinders the fruition of many a scheme fraught with the greatest good to the community –the need of energetic self-sacrificing leader. There are many of our best players who possess all those good qualities, which would command success, but unfortunately their difference has held them back. That football is an excellent means of obtaining monetary help was apparent on Saturday afternoon when an immense crowd packed the grounds of the Everton Football club, Walton Breck road Anfield to witness the match between the Everton and combined Liverpool clubs. The match is but one instance of what athletics may accomplish if they chose to set to work properly and energetically. That excellent institution, the Stanley Hospital, is crippled in the carrying out of its benefit purpose; owing to the want of funds, with the growing requirements of locality and the daily increasing demand on the limited resources of the hospital, there is urgent need of more funds. There is accoundation, which might be utilised if money were forecoming. The time of charity in this direction, has however, not kept pace with the increased need, and just at a time when it was thought a substantial addition might be made by adopting the expedient which had been tried with very successful results on two previous occasions the committee experienced a series disappointment. It was felt that in view of the Exhibition of Navigation, Travelling, and Commerce which is to be held in Liverpool next year, it would be unwise to proceed with the Stanley Hospital gala, which it had been decided to held every fourth year. No less a sum than £4,000 had been raised on each of the proceeding occasions, and the committee are now most anxious to raise that amount by some other means. Various suggestions have been made with this object. The one which should be productive of the most successful results is the proposal that a certain number of philanthropic gentleman interested in the welfare of this, and like institutions, should each contribute £100. Mr. John Holding C.C., has already generally offered that sum, and the Everton Football Club (of which Mr. Houlding is president) nobly came forward with the Liverpool clubs and played the match on Saturday to raise if possible £100 on behalf of the hospital. Whether the committee of the institution will fully realise their wishes is at present conjectural, but one thing is quite certain the football players have acted most generously, and great credit is due to them. They have not only the happy though that their exertions gave pleasure to a large number of person, but they can justly feel proud at having aided forward one of the most valuable charities for the alleviation of the suffering of their unfortunate fellow-citizens. It is to be hoped that their example will be generally followed, and that steps may be taken as speedily as possible to arrange for a “Charity Challenge Cup” to be competed for next season. Prior to the match Mr. John Houlding entertained to luncheon his Worship the Mayor (Alderman David Radcliffe), Councillors G.C. Dobell, J. Woodcock, G. Peet, E. Paull, P.H. Rathbone, and E. H. Cookson; the Rev Canon Major Lester, Dr Barr, Dr. Costine, Dr. Sheldon, and Mr. L. E. Bennett (treasurer of the Stanley Hospital). The mayor the members of the Comporation Mr. Houlding and the remainder of his guests, left Stanley house about half-past three o'clock and crossed the road into the grounds of the Everton Club, where they watched the play from the stand. On being recoginised by the people within the enclosure, his worship was warmly cheered.

The weather, unfortunately, was not over inviting, but still there was a large gathering of spectators upwards of 2500 persons being present. Both sides were well represented especially that of Everton, which had the assistance of several leading members of the Blackburn Rovers' first team including Fecitt, Douglas, and Suter. Shortly after the advertised time Mr. Councillor Houlding, as president of the Everton Club, formally put the ball in motion, after which Gibson on behalf of the home eleven kicked off, when the sphere founds it way to the Liverpool end of the field. Eyton-Jones at once became prominent, but although nothing immediately transpired Hutton, after a brief interval was enabled to level an abortive shot at goal. Pressure at the Everton end was maintained, and although Marriott relieved, Morris promptly returned to the attack, and succeeded in placing the first goal for Liverpool after about ten minutes' play. Favoured by the wind, the visitors still kept up a very considerable degree of pressure although Everton, through the instrumentality of Fecitt, Higgins, Farmer, and Dobson were enabled occasionally to break away, but their shooting at goal was lacking in precision. Eventually Hutton became conspicuous, and a little later Morris sent in a shot which Lindsay, unfortunately for his side, passed through his own goal thus adding a second point for Liverpool, shortly after which the whistle signalled half-time. During the interval the Mayor courteously addressed a few appreciative remarks to the players, after which the game proceeded. Immediately upon resuming Bailey was called upon to defend his charge, but although for a time this was successfully accomplished Farmer sent in a shot which completely beat the Liverpool custodian. Shortly afterwards the same player enabled Douglas to register a second goal while barely a minute had elapsed when Pickering added a third, this last feat being the signal for a general outburst of appreciative cheering. The Evertonians were now being materially aided by the wind, and although a rainstorm swept over the ground, the game was continued with unabated vigour. Fecitt was seen in some exceedingly fine dribbling, while Higgins was also playing exceptionally well. The Evertonians had gained the upperhand by this time, and after Higgins had driven the ball against the crossbar, Pickering rushed up and scored the fourth goal for Everton. The Liverpool men now made a determined effort to retrieve their position, and were so far successful that after a few minutes further play. Wilson, as the result of a judicious cross-over by Morris scored a magnificent goal from half back. The play now became most exciting, but again the Evertonians loyally answered the call of their captain, and finally Douglas who was well aided by Whittle inaugurated a further attack upon the unfortunate Liverpool fortress, which for the fifth time was reduced, Farmer, of Welsh international fame, being credited with the concluding point scored in the game. Afterwards Dick (late of the Kilnarnock Athletic), Suter, Hutton, Galbriath Veitch, and Douglas, exhibited fine play for their respective sides, and when the whistle blew for the cessation of play a well-earned victory remained with Everton by five goals to three. The following were the teams; - Everton; - C.M. Lindsay goal; T. Marriott (captain) and F. Suter, backs; J. Pickering, M. Higgins, and Dobson half-backs; Douglas and Whittle right wing; Fecitt centre; Farmer and W. Gibson left wing. Liverpool; H.A. Bailey (Ramblers), (captain), goal; T. Veitch (Bootle) and A. McCallum (Stanley), backs; G. Galbriath (Bootle), W. Wilson and Dick (Stanley), half-backs; W. George (St Mary's), and T. Morris (Cambrian) right wing; McGregor (Stanley) centre; J. Eyton-Jones and G. Hutton (Bootle), left wing.

It is probable that the anticipations of the promoters of the match will be fully realised, and that at least £100 will be handed over to the treasurer of Stanley hospital. At the conclusion of the match Mr. Houlding entertained the players at the Sandon Hotel, a most enjoyable evening being spent.

Everton V Bolton wanderers.
A grand supplementary match in aid of Stanley Hospital has been arranged to be played at the Anfield ground tomorrow evening, when it is expected the Wanderers will place their full team in the field. The selected players are as follows; - Everton; - Lindsay goal; T. Marriott and Dobson backs; Pickering, Higgins, and Finlay, half-backs; Whittle, and Douglas, (Blackburn Rovers), right wing; Scrowcroft centre; Farmer and Gibson, left wing. Bolton Wanderers; - Hay, goal; Powell, and Lucas, backs; Weir Steel, and Roberts, half-backs; Steel, Hewitson, right wing; Struther, centre; Davenport and Brogan left wing.

June 1 st 1885. The Liverpool Courier.
Liverpool and District v East Lancashire at Anfield road
2,000 spectators being present, Whittle, Higgins and Farmer, playing for the Liverpool and District the Liverpool district losing by three goals to nil Whittle had to leave the field, during the second half which left the home team weakened.

STANLEY HOSPITAL NEW BUILDING FUND.
June 6, 1885. The Liverpool Mercury.
The major has received the following sums towards defraying the debt of £3,000 on the above hospital. The Everton Football Club £25; Sir Andrews B. Walker £100; John Duncan, Son and Co., £2. 20's; Mr. Alderman Rigsby, £10; Mr. Williams Cliff, £50, The mayor will be glad to received further subs in aid of this fund, Town Hall –Liverpool.